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Discussion Starter #181 (Edited)
Another Gen 3 Coyote Install Update

Plugging away on details for the Gen 3 Coyote installation. Have basically determined how I’m going to deal with two major items: PCM mounting/cable routing and cold air intake.

PCM mounting: Some of this I’ve talked about before. The large harness and connector coming off the engine terminates near the front corner of the RH head. Without modifying the cable, really no choice but to put the PCM in that vicinity. I know some guys unwrap the cable and then mount the PCM in the firewall or PS footbox area. Thought briefly about that. But the harness is complex (wires exit along its path for each injector, coil pack, multiple sensors, and now the new DI hardware) and I just don’t want to dive into it. Plus it’s already congested in the firewall area and beyond with the A/C and heat, accessories I’ve added, etc. Plus I'd have a whole bunch of excess cable between the PCM and PDB to deal with. So I’m staying with mounting it near the RH front of the engine. Note this is nearly identical to the location used on #8674 and how FFR shows in their instructions for the Roadster. I know some are concerned about the headers in that area. But it hasn’t proven to be an issue. These modules are made for the harsh underhood environment. Within reason of course. Note also this is the same general area that Ford mounts them in the Mustang. What’s interesting though is in the Mustang it’s packed in with a lot of other stuff and doesn’t appear that it would have much airflow around it. As opposed to ours that are more free-standing. So seems to me it’s completely safe there.

So for the actual mounting, the new Bosch PCM with the Gen 3 only has two mounting ears near the connectors, versus the four the previous version has. Plus they’re not too friendly to attach to IMO. I decided to make a bracket that sandwiches the PCM and holds it suspended under the frame rail in the area mentioned. After some patterns, prototypes, and one fail, have finalized on a piece of 1-1/2 inch right angle aluminum riveted to the frame rail, and a wraparound bracket made from mild steel. I have nutserts in the aluminum bracket and will use 1/8 inch cushioning material where the PCM is contacted. Looks like this:



My first approach was to mount the PCM facing down, e.g. wire connections on the bottom. I thought it looked a little neater. Like this:


But after thinking about it a couple days and sitting and staring at it for awhile (that again…) decided that wasn’t such a good plan. The wiring was way too congested with everything else, no clear path for the large harness that needs to go back to the PDB, plus the connectors and wires would be the closest thing to the header area. So flipped it over and this is what I’m going with:


This will get cleaned up a bunch for the final installation. The large center connector is from the engine, obviously. The front connector goes to the PDB. That harness needs to be re-configured quite a bit. I’ll unwrap it and bring the starter and fan wires back to the PDB area. Probably also the engine connections (alternator, MAF, etc.). That will make the cable a little skinnier where it's visible FWIW. I’ll run the cable along the outside of the top frame rail, along the bottom of the firewall, and to the PDB near the center of the firewall. I was hoping to hide the cable a little more than that, but just not in the cards. There will be heater and A/C hoses all over the place in the same area. So I’m thinking it’s no big deal. The rear connector, BTW, is only for the O2 sensors. Ford changed how they’re wired again. So all three Gen Coyotes have been different. In this case, the wires go directly from here to the sensors. It too, though, will need to be reconfigured to be optimal. That’s as far as I’m going to go for now. When the engine mockup comes out, I’ll get everything mounted and wired for good.

Cold air intake: Some of this I mentioned before too. The throttle body on the Gen 3 Coyote points up 8-9 degrees more than before. Plus the cowl is relatively close on the underside. I looked at several of the Mustang aftermarket cold air intake kits, but didn't see one that would fit. The Spectre setup FFR has in their instructions and I have in #8674 won’t fit either. They do mention a MAF tube from Treadstone Performance. In looking at that piece plus other items on their website, came up with a combination that I hoped would fit. Received the parts today, and all is good. I’m impressed with the quality of the parts too. I’m especially pleased the MAF tube has rolled ends. So properly clamped they shouldn’t come apart. (Reference “Ride of Shame” thread for #8674…) The right angle coupler is very robust. I’ll need to add a connector for the PCV hose, but that’s easy enough. The parts I received are:


  • S35090BLK 90 Degree Silicone Hose Coupler 3.50" - 3.50" (103411-128578) Black
  • MAPHL35 MAF Mass Air Flow Adapter Pipe, 3.50" Low (103748-129055) Polished aluminum
  • AF10044BLK Air Filter Medium 3.5" Neck (104214-129638) Black
Factory Five also sells this same Treadstone MAF tube. Their part number 16403. They also sell a 90deg Silicone Hose – FFR#16404, and Coyote Air Filter – FFR#16608. But I don't know if those two are the same has what I bought directly from Treadstone. I had to cut 1-inch off the right angle coupler where it plugs onto the throttle body. It was too long as I suspected from their pictures. With that, it fits up exactly like I hoped. Based on pictures and measurements taken previously, it will fit under the front cowl.



The cold air intake leaves just enough room for the Moroso cooling system expansion tank. It’s tight, but not quite as tight as the angle on this picture indicates.


On a related note, on the Treadstone Performance website they promoted the use of a honeycomb airflow straightener in the MAF tube. Installed at the neck of the tube on the air filter side to clean up the air going through the sensor. Did a little Google searching, and maybe has some merit. Supposedly improves MAF readings at lower RPM's. So added one to my order. Thinking I'll just keep it aside for the moment. But something I'll take a look at down the road. Next up is to make brackets for the Moroso expansion tank and finalize the Odyssey battery mount. Then the engine will come back out.
 

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Discussion Starter #183
About how far below the frame rails does the stock pan hang?

Thanks
Little over 2 inches at the front of the stock pan, and about 2-1/2 inches at the back. That plus it's plastic. Or "composite" as Ford calls it. Not a good combination. No question has to be changed to a low profile version, like the Moroso I'll be using.
 

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Discussion Starter #184 (Edited)
Engine Mockup, Battery, Moroso Tank

Today I finished everything I wanted to do planning wire and hose routing, accessory mounting, etc. So lifted the engine back out of the engine bay and onto the stand for now. Easy enough to do without a bell housing and transmission in the way. Put the chassis back on the lift. Good to have it back there. Man I am definitely spoiled. First thing I did once I had it out was install the M-7600-C pilot bearing and check the fit of the M-7560-T46 flywheel. Everything fits fine so that little issue is completely closed as far as I’m concerned. I had the pilot bearing in the freezer and it drove right in using a 1-inch socket around the perimeter. Also had the clutch dowels in the freezer so drove those into the flywheel. Tomorrow I’m going to put the accessories on the engine (alternator, A/C pump, KRC power steering) and then start working on the modification to the Moroso oil pan pickup.



Here is a picture of the Odyssey PC925T battery I’m using. Relatively small and easily fits in this location. Listed as 28 lbs, but I haven’t weighed it. Since it’s AGM, I can use the same CTEK 3300 charger I’ve been using for the Optima in #8674. After looking at a number of choices, including the kit provided battery tray, decided to go with this Artec Industries OY9251 battery mount. Had to drill new holes in the base because the ones they had didn’t line up with the frame. But that was easy. Held in place with four heavy duty 1/4-inch nutserts. I’ll have it powder coated before final installation.


Also finished the mounting bracket for the Moroso radiator expansion tank. After thinking through several approaches, this is what I went with. The mounting location isn’t real handy, so took some unusual shapes and angles to get it done. The main mount is .090 aluminum, and the braces are .052 aluminum with a 1/2-thick aluminum piece between. My little H-F brake won’t touch these thicknesses, so bent all the pieces in my bench vise using angle iron and a wood block and hammer. Kind of dings the aluminum up a bit. But will be completely hidden plus powder coated. There are two 5/16-inch nutserts for the flange mount on the tank, and then the bottom piece fits into the receptacle on the bottom of the tank along with a piece of cut heater hose for a cushion. Now that I have the engine out, I can reach the mounting location and will install with three heavy duty 5/16-inch nutserts. Same kind as shown on the mount itself. Just with the clamps, it’s rock sold so I’m confident it will be OK.




So last night as I was wrapping up this mount, I realized how much lower it is than the same tank in #8674. Not sure how or why I didn't see this before. Further checking shows the top of the tank is basically even with the “T” connection on the LH side of the engine where the hose out the bottom of the tank is connected. Visible in the last picture above with the black cap. Since this is the intended fill path for coolant through the cap on the expansion tank, and fluid isn't going to go uphill any further than the level in the tank (at least when gravity is the only motivation) decided I might have a problem. My first inclination was to go back to the drawing board. Ugh. But with the time and money invested in this setup so far, not giving up so easily. With the available space, the frame design including the large angle braces across the opening, and everything else that needs to fit into this same real estate, there’s no easy option that I can see that would raise this tank any higher.

Did a whole bunch of searching, both in the forums and otherwise, and thought it about it a bunch. Here’s my conclusion: The only real problem will be the initial coolant fill and subsequent flush/re-fills down the road. The heater hose connection just above the “T” where the hose from the tank attaches (also visible in the last picture above), can be removed and coolant filled there with a funnel or whatever. Although not ideal, since it happens pretty rarely, not a big deal. Once the system is full and sealed and under pressure, the expansion tank will still do what it’s intended to do. It will still burp the cooling system from the connection on top of the engine and top of the radiator. It will still accept excess coolant as it heats and expands, and will be drawn back into the system as it cools. In that regard, no different than a standard overflow tank that is often mounted quite low in the engine compartment. I thought about installing the kit provided T-filler in the upper radiator hose and use that for filling. But that adds two more joints in the hose plus the cap. I can live with using the heater hose connection.

I contacted the Ford Performance help desk to see what their take was and if they thought my thinking made sense. Not much help to be honest. Response was “mount the tank as high as you can,” “mount it the same height as the engine,” (asked what part of the engine, but no answer), and “mount it higher than the tanks on the radiator.” It is. That’s not an issue. Because of the forward location and angle of the radiator, the side tanks are well below the expansion tank. That was all I got. No stoppers. But no firm endorsement of my plan either.

Bottom line, even though the expansion tank is lower than ideal and will take a little special handing for the initial fill, I don’t see it working any differently than the FFR supplied T-filler and overflow tank. Actually it’s better because it has the provision for burping via the engine and radiator connections. Anyone have any thoughts about this and reasons why I shouldn’t go ahead with mounting the Moroso tank where pictured?
 

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Discussion Starter #185 (Edited)
More Gen 3 Coyote Progress

Wasn’t planning to do an update today. But made some good progress today that I thought might be interesting. Got the engine off the shop crane and onto the engine stand. With that done, started on the front accessories. Installed the KRC power steering, A/C compressor, and standard Coyote alternator. Good news, everything fits. No surprises with the Gen 3 Coyote. Couple of notes for each.

he KRC kit is their 66302125 Ford Boss 302 Coyote Hydraulic Power Steering Kit. Comes with the pump and pulley, reservoir, mounting bracket, new water pump pulley, and serpentine belt. Note I'm nearly positive this is the same kit that Factory Five supplies with their Coyote power steering kit. I just didn't happen to go that way because I wanted to source my own rack and lines. I have this same kit setup on #8674. But KRC made some significant changes. (Plus raised the price. :eek:) They now only supply their aluminum Elite pump vs. the steel pump on #8674. They’ve also added an integral reservoir, which is super nice. One less thing to mount in the engine compartment and one less hose to deal with. One of the really nice things about the KRC setup is their changeable flow valves. Allows you to fine tune the amount of boost from the system. Unfortunately, the kit comes with their standard 2.22 GPM flow valve. That’s way too much boost for our cars. I changed it to the 1.18 GPM (ID Mark 4) 253040000 flow valve. Same as I have in #8674, which I really like, and what others using the KRC setup have reported works well. For the installation, I had to cut about 1/4-inch off the end of the three mounting screws. They were bottoming in the mounting holes in the head. Don’t recall doing this before. But no big deal. For the water pump pulley, I cut off the Ford screws that were removed from the head and used those for the pulley mount. I like the hex head screws way better than the Allen head screws KRC provided, and they just happened to be the right size with integral washers. Nice. They're the same style as the mounting screws on the OE pulley but are too short for the thicker KRC pulley. I painted the heads of the five KRC supplied cap screws with my trusty Eastwood chassis black. The black oxide rusts quite quickly. A close look at #8674 will prove that. Finally, the pulley on the pump is listed as “press on” but there are threads in the pump shaft and #8674 has a flange head screw installed there. Don’t remember if it came with the kit or not, but this kit didn’t supply one. Quick trip to Ace and that was dealt with.

Nothing much to say about mounting the A/C pump or the alternator. In both cases, just followed the directions and all went together OK. One thing I find somewhat interesting. The serpentine belt driving the water pump and alternator from the crankshaft uses a very typical serpentine tensioning idler pulley. The serpentine belt on the power steering pump, driven from the water pump pulley, is tensioned by adjusting the angle of the pump. The serpentine belt on the A/C pump, driven from the crankshaft, uses a stretching type belt that doesn’t require adjustment or a tensioner. First time I’ve used one of those. Interesting to put on though. Factory Five shows a step-by-step method using a tie-wrap and then turning the crank pulley to roll it on. Worked OK. The final front accessory setup looks pretty crazy. I have no idea why builders get intimidated with the Coyote. :p


With that done, flipped the engine over and started working on the Moroso oil pan installation and pickup modification. First thing was to check the fit of the oil pan gasket/windage tray and the Moroso pan. The OE pan for the Gen 3 Coyote is the plastic (composite…) pan I pictured previously with the integral oil pickup and gasket/windage tray. I picked up a Gen 2 gasket/windage tray (part number BR3Z-6710-A) and confirmed it fit fine along with the Moroso pan. All the sealing surfaces are exactly the same and the bolt holes all line up perfectly. Started preliminary work on the pickup mod. First was to confirm the 8491A761 bushing, 1" ID, 1-1/4" OD, 1-1/2" long, that I got from McMaster fit the oil pump inlet. It does. Perfectly. Nice slip fit into the rubber gasket. The ID fits the OD of the Moroso oil pickup tube. So we’re off and running. Tomorrow I plan to get this completely figured out and fixtured for welding. This is the new gasket and you can see the bushing pushed into the oil pump in the lower LH corner of the pic.

 

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Discussion Starter #188
Are these torx bit bolts on the flywheel? If so what size? Thanks.
I was able to remove them with a T55 Torx bit. Fit OK and got the job done. But to be honest, wasn't the right bit. Where the standard Torx bit has kind of pointed ends on the star, these Gen 3 clutch bolts had more of a flat on the ends of the star. Quick Google search shows these are likely a variant called TORX PLUS. Hadn't run into that before, but doesn't matter for me. The M-6379-C 5.0L Coyote flywheel bolt kit I'll be using to put the standard flywheel back on is good old generic 6-sided hex bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #189 (Edited)
More Wiring Plus

It’s been a while since I’ve posted an update. Have been doing other life stuff, but still quite a bit of time on the build. Just hasn’t been much to post about. Here’s an accumulation of things.

First an update on a previous subject. I spent some hours trying to modify the Moroso oil pan pickup tube to work with the Gen 3 Coyote oil pump. In the end only one word. Fail. I won’t go into tons of detail except to say the Moroso pickup is now in multiple pieces. As it turns out, the angle coming out of the pump doesn’t work with the curve on the Moroso pieces, and in the end I'm not satisfied with how it would mate up with the oil pump receptacle. Needless to say, not a place to have any issues. After looking a lot more closely and thinking about it some more, decided to order this Modular Motorsports GT350/2018 Coyote pickup tube. Thanks to another forum member for pointing out to me. Pickup tube for GT350 / 2018 + Oil Pump [403360] - $149.99 : Modular Motorsports, Home of the Worlds Fastest Modular Engines. I’m nearly certain it will still require a little modification because it’s intended for a deeper pan than the Moroso pan we use. But everything else about it looks like it will work. And most especially since it’s specifically made for this style oil pump. As I mentioned before, I already purchased the older style oil pan gasket/windage tray, which they picture as going with this pickup. One other small detail is the Gen 3 Coyote doesn’t have the stud and spacer on one of the bearing caps used to anchor the pickup end of the tube. So ordered those pieces. The pickup tube took a while to ship, but now it’s in transit and will be here Tuesday. I’m anxious, to say the least, to see if it’s going to work. Haven’t ordered from this company before. They have a lot of interesting products (and apparently the only game in town for this particular part) but I own it. Their return policy: “ABSOLUTELY NO RETURNS OR CANCELLATIONS ON ANY ITEMS REGARDLESS IF THE ITEM HAS SHIPPED OR NOT – DO NOT EVEN ASK – IF YOU ORDERED IT, YOU OWN IT!” Yep, in all caps. There’s another sentence or two, but that’s the gist of it. Interesting. I really hope this part works since I can't return it. But mostly I hope it works because I'm out of ideas.

Most of my time since the last update has been diving deep into the wiring. I’ve reconfigured a couple of the harnesses, and will probably end up doing the same for most of them. I’m really focused on conserving as much space as possible behind the dash because of space needed for other stuff including mostly HVAC ducting. That combined with my OCD tendencies trying to keep things neat and orderly especially with the totally exposed front, and there you go.

First up was the main Coyote harness. The one that includes the Power Distribution Box (PDB) and connections to power, ground, cooling fan, starter, behind the dash, etc. It’s the biggest and most complicated harness. I removed the supercharger leg and a couple other unneeded wires and moved the cooling fan and starter wires back to the PDB area. Then rearranged and shortened the wires that go through the firewall into the dash area. I separated the MIL from the ODB2 and will be routing the MIL to the dash where it should be. I mentioned before that Ford now only has three wires on the pigtail lead. Fuel pump, ignition sense, start sense. I’m probably going to connect those directly to the required RF wires and not even use the connector. More space savings. By taking the wires listed out of the main harness between the PCM connection and the PDB, I was able to replace the convolute with a smaller size which will make it slightly less obvious. Once everything was done, re-wrapped everything with harness tape the way Ford had it. This isn’t much of a picture, but shows what’s left that has to go behind the firewall. Those that have done Coyote’s will maybe appreciate. Greatly simplified.


Next up was the front harness. Again I decided to take the harness apart and change the configuration so it would route better. Plus I added a wire for the fog lights. One thing I noticed on this newer version of the RF harness is they have really upgraded the ground wires. That was always a weak point in the previous versions, and many of us added grounds at the four corners. I’ll probably still add a ground at the front and back, just because everything still ends up going through that one ground wire in the footbox area. But in general it’s much improved. Here’s how my front harness now routes. I don’t have the padded clamps installed yet, but you can get the idea. I used a smaller grommet at the footbox which uses a much smaller hole. It’s pretty easy to take the pins out of the connectors, pass just the wires through, and then re-pin. I also added harness wrap like Ford uses on their harnesses. Added protection, looks better, and easier to keep clean. Out of the footbox and along the lower part of the chassis tube. Then split the left and right and took the right hand wires behind the radiator tunnel piece.


Left hand side with wires broken out for the cooling fan and the horns.


Right hand side same as left.


This is where I’m at on the firewall. Have the PDB mounted and wires through the firewall. Also made up the short SS flex lines for the fuel lines to the regulator.


Finally, starting to lay out the main power wires. I don’t have my battery tray back from powder coat yet, so just getting started here. Will do a very similar power connection as the last two Roadster builds. #2 cables to a master disconnect with the handle in the cockpit, then wires from there. Lots more to work on here.


When the engine compartment is done, will tackle this mess. Lots of dieting will be going on here too. It will be interesting (hopefully) to compare this “before” picture to the “after” one when completed.

 

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Discussion Starter #190 (Edited)
More Wiring Plus (continued)

Another detail with the Coyote installation is the bottom clutch switch. Factory Five provides bracketry for the switch with their Coyote installation kit. But intended for their cable clutch setup. Doesn’t work exactly for a hydraulic clutch like I’m doing. After looking at several options, ended up using the supplied FF bracket for the switch itself. It snaps in nicely and is adjustable. The challenge then is to push the switch when the clutch is pushed down. Thought about modifying the other piece they provided like some have done. But instead made a piece from 3/4-inch wide by 1/8-inch thick steel that bolts between the clevis and nut on the MC, and then wraps around to push the clutch switch. Seems to work just fine.


Finally, spent a couple hours today wrapping up the clean-up and prep of the main body section. Need to get this done while it’s still a little warm out. (Frost warning tonight…) Everything is now straight, square, even, smooth, etc. I have a couple repairs that need to be made in the corners of the scoops behind the doors. Visible in the pic if you look closely. But no big deal. I’m also planning to spray some Lizard Skin ceramic insulation on the inside of the roof area. Hoping that will help control the temp inside a little. In general, I’m happy with the body so far. We’ll see how it fits. Most seem to be working out OK. I’ll be doing the same on the nose piece in the next couple days hopefully.


On a completely separate note, a good buddy in our local club took delivery this year on a brand new Superformance Roadster with a Gen 2 Coyote installed. It had the stock tune and he noticed some of the same issues I had with mine on the stock tune. So he asked me to work with Lund Racing like I did for a custom tune. Brought it to my house, parked it in my garage, and said to call when it was done. Cool!


The Superformance has no hood scoop, stripes, roll bars, or side pipes. Has undercar exhaust with cats. No surprise, it’s very quiet. Lund Racing did their usual great work and the new tune is installed with multiple log and update cycles, and the car returned to its owner. Running absolutely great. A pretty major transformation. It was interesting looking this car over and driving it. Hadn’t been up this close to a Superformance before.

Now finally, all good build projects involve new tools, right? I’ve been pretty disappointed that the Coupe build hasn’t yielded many new tools. I guess the ones from previous builds were still OK to use. But having said that, I use calipers all the time. Have several of the H-F variety digital ones and one average quality analog one. But one thing I get frustrated about was how frequently I need to change batteries. Which aren’t cheap and they go dead of course at the worst time. Plus not really sold on how accurate those cheapo ones are. So did some Amazon browsing looking for a better quality one, and found this Mitutoyo 500-474 digital caliper that’s solar-powered. Works in any reasonably lit workspace. Who knew? I have it and have used it for several days. Not cheap, but hopefully will last a long time. I like it a lot. Way more accurate than I need, but that’s OK. And no more batteries.


That’s it for now. Or should I say that’s more than enough? Back to wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter #191
Gen 3 Coyote Oil Pump Pickup Update

Today I received the Modular Motorsports Racing 403360 oil pan pickup tube mentioned in my last update. It appears to be a very well made piece and needless to say I was anxious to see how it fit in my new Coyote. Good news and not surprising news. First the good news. Fits the GT350 style oil pump connector perfectly, the oil pan gasket/windage tray perfectly, and hits the opening in the Moroso pan just fine.


I wasn’t sure how they would address keeping the pump end of the tube in the oil pump since there are no mounting or retaining screws on that end. The fitting on the end of the pickup tube extends about 5/8-inch down into a rubber gasket in the oil pump. So it's pretty substantial. But still. Recall the OE oil pan has the pickup tube integral with the pan. So with the pan bolted on there’s no way for it to come out. The answer appears to be a small step on the side of the pickup tube that’s engaged by the windage tray. Slightly visible in the picture above, but better seen here.



It’s different, but seems that it would be adequate. With the other end bolted down, I’m not sure it could fall out anyway. It’s negative pressure here vs. positive. So the tube is being naturally drawn in. The windage tray has a web piece directly under where it’s holding, so it’s pretty substantial. I guess I’m OK with it.

Now for the no surprise news. The pickup end is much too long. Exactly 1-9/16 inches too long by my measurements to the inside of the Moroso pan. Not including the .250” to .500” clearance recommended by Moroso. So I have two choices for rework. (1) Shorten the MMR piece by cutting off and re-welding to the shorter length. But this also means I would have to modify the retaining bracket to the bearing cap. Plus taking that much off the length would get into where the pipe bends. (2) Use the good end from each pickup tube I've purchased so far – the oil pump end from the MMR pickup, and the oil pan end from the Moroso pickup. This looks really promising. I already have the Moroso piece cut into pieces, so no loss there. Checking as carefully as I can at this point, the angles, location, and height all look like they would work. This is the idea.


I’m still waiting for the cap bolt stud and spacer from Tasca Parts. So won’t make a final decision until they’re received and I can check everything out a little more precisely. But this looks promising. If anyone has any better ideas, let me know! (That doesn't include changing the oil pump as Ford suggested.) In the meantime, hopefully for those in the future with the Gen 3 Coyote (and aren't so impatient) there will be a plug and play pickup tube available and won’t have to go through this.

Last for today, I picked up the pieces from powder coat that I fabbed previously. Mounting for the PCM, expansion tank, and battery. More of the puzzle pieces needed to finalize wiring and get the chassis ready for the engine installation.


This coming weekend we’re off for family visits in Idaho and Oregon. So about a 3-week break on the build. Sadly, driving season could very well be over by the time we get back. More time to build I guess.
 

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Very nice work Edwardb!
In my opinion, aligning and rewelding the oil pickup tube is more complicated than swapping in a Gen 2 oil pump. Having the engine out of the car makes the job so much easier. As a plus, that would be the time to upgrade the oil pump gears. The only weak part of the Coyote. As you know Ford uses forged oil pump gears in their “high-end” motors. So far that is the direction I’m heading.

Option 2: I called MMR and they said send them the Moroso oil pan and they could adapt their pickup tube to fit. They have a Gen 3 in the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #193
Very nice work Edwardb!
In my opinion, aligning and rewelding the oil pickup tube is more complicated than swapping in a Gen 2 oil pump. Having the engine out of the car makes the job so much easier. As a plus, that would be the time to upgrade the oil pump gears. The only weak part of the Coyote. As you know Ford uses forged oil pump gears in their “high-end” motors. So far that is the direction I’m heading.

Option 2: I called MMR and they said send them the Moroso oil pan and they could adapt their pickup tube to fit. They have a Gen 3 in the shop.
We'll have to agree to disagree that it would easier to tear the engine down and replace the oil pump versus working with the one that's there including making the parts I have work. Agree changing to upgraded billet aftermarket oil pump gears might be a good idea if it's already apart (at another $300 - 400 cost) but by all accounts the stock gears are good for up to 650 HP or so. I won't ever be close to that. Interesting that MMR would be willing to make a modded pickup. Basically just shorter to accommodate the lower profile oil pan. Moroso is also promising an updated version as I mentioned. I'm into this too far to go back, have a couple time constraints, and I'm pretty confident about the mod I'm planning. You (and others) have the benefit of hindsight watching my efforts here, and not repeating my mistakes. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #194
More Gen 3 Coyote Installation

This will be my last update for a few weeks as we’re off for family visits out west. Couple small bits of progress to report. Yet another bit of a setback on the Gen 3 Coyote oil pickup tube saga. I mentioned before that since the Gen 3 Coyote has the integrated pickup in the oil pan, it doesn’t have the stud on one of the main bearing cap bolts that’s used to anchor the pickup end of the tube. It’s cap bearing bolt #15 in Ford manuals BTW. Seems simple enough. Order the cap bolt with stud from a previous Coyote version and swap out the plain bolt installed in the Gen 3. There’s a threaded spacer that goes on the stud, and a bolt to hold the pickup. Like this:


After looking at multiple exploded drawings and parts listing, couldn’t exactly the determine the part number for the cap bolt with stud. It was one of two. I had an order to Tasca Parts for my radiator hoses and miscellaneous so added both part numbers to the order. The order was delayed for one piece that was on back order. Called them and found one of my two bolts with the stud was backordered, not in stock anywhere, and no ETA from Ford. So took a chance and had them delete the part and ship the order hoping the one they did have was the one I needed. Received the parts yesterday, and you guessed it, the part I received is the wrong one. The inner bolts (the one needed with the stud) are a larger diameter than the outer bolts on the caps. The one I received (pictured above) is the smaller diameter used for the outer bolt. Can’t use it there because the oil pickup tube doesn't align there plus that’s not where the hole is in the windage tray. So I visited my local Ford dealer and spoke with the parts manager. He agreed the part I didn’t receive was the one I needed. Of course they didn’t have one either. Looked through all their distribution channels and told me the same thing. None in stock anywhere and no ETA. Good grief! I’m going to let this simmer for the next few weeks. Right now I’m thinking it would be pretty straightforward to have the threaded spacer welded to the top of the existing plain bolt out of the engine. Done properly, that should be fine. Any other ideas? This is another issue that anyone using a Gen 3 Coyote will have to figure out. Hopefully the right parts will be available at some point.

On a more successful note, since I’m working on wiring and routing of everything, decided I wanted to get the DBW pedal assembly mounted so that wire could be routed as needed. I mentioned before that the Gen 3 Coupe has a nice mounting plate with holes already drilled for the Coyote DBW assembly. But unfortunately, too high and aligns the plug receptacle directly underneath the steering column. That just isn’t going to work. On the Roadster, the DBW assembly ends up further to the right and clears the column pretty easily. But the Coupe steering column is apparently in a different location, plus the footbox sidewall is much closer up there (more room for the engine, that’s good) so the DBW has to be either really low or moved to the left. Not wanting the pedal too low or the pedal arm cut too short, I chose to orient it so the plug was accessible on the LH side of the steering column. I used the DBW mounting plate included with the Coyote installation kit and modified it to sandwich on top of the installed mounting plate and orient the pedal where it needed to be. I put some 1/4-inch nutserts in the mounting plate so I didn’t have to fish washers and nuts behind there to take the DBW in and out. (Love working down deep in footboxes…) Also made a little bracket assembly, which I won’t try to explain, to anchor the other side of the DBW module to make it a little more solid. On the Roadster, the RH side of the module ends up tight against a frame rail. Not so on the Coupe. I used some ideas posted by another forum member (thanks shark92651!) for the pedal modification and used the stock pedal rather than grafting the pedal from the FF assembly like in the instructions and what I did on #8674. Happy with how it turned out. These pics show the final pedal arrangement. Not exactly the best angle on the pic. The pedal is almost exactly centered between the brake pedal and the side wall. Looks closer to the brake pedal in this pic than it really is. Also a better view of where the harness plug ended up.



That’s it for now. When we get back, first priority will be to get the engine bay wiring done (I’m about 50% complete), hopefully the issues with the oil pan pickup resolved, and finally get the engine assembly completed and installed into the chassis.
 

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Discussion Starter #195 (Edited)
Main Power, Gen 3 Coyote Progress

It’s been a while, but I’m finally back. We were in Oregon and Idaho visiting family for three weeks. Great seeing everyone and had an awesome time. But good to be back home, like always. We ran into snow in Minneapolis on the flights home, and it caught up with Michigan the next day. The ground has been white since. I guess that means driving season is officially over. Always a little sad. But back to the build after catching up with home duties for several days.

Main focus of the last several days has been to finish the main power wiring. Obviously it needs to get done, but also to wrap up the engine compartment so the Coyote can go in for good. I used the same main power scheme as on #8674 and similar to #7750, just without the Coyote. I used the Breeze front battery mounts in the Roadsters. For the Coupe, the front mount location is standard. I get a lot of questions about this, so here is the scheme I use:

  • +12V main power #2 gauge cable from battery positive to post on Ron Francis MS-1 master disconnect accessible from inside the cockpit.
  • On the same post (+12V, unswitched), #4 gauge cable to the Coyote 250 amp fuse (provided in controls pack) and then to the front post on the Coyote PDB.
  • On the other side of the master disconnect (+12V, switched), #4 gauge cable back to the large post on the starter solenoid.
  • Also on the switched side is a cable to a Blue Sea Systems #2307 150A bus bar in the cockpit. The Ron Francis harness power connections will be made there.
  • Main ground #2 gauge cable from battery negative to spot on the frame. Powder coat removed under the lug and attached with 3/8-16 flange head screw into tapped hole.
  • Also stacked at this frame ground location are the (1) main ground from the Coyote PDB, and (2) #4 gauge ground wire to engine. I’ll add a second engine ground from one of the starter bolts to another location on the frame, probably near the motor mount. I’ve always done two engine grounds, and will on this build as well.
This wiring approach gives full time power to the Coyote PDB, as outlined in the Ford Performance instructions, and switches the Ron Francis harness. With the switch off, the Coyote won't start since there would be no ignition sense voltage to the Coyote pigtail and also no battery voltage to the starter. Additionally (although I haven't tried it) the Coyote should stop if the switch were turned off since again the ignition sense voltage would be cut off. I know many install a master disconnect. But also many don't. I can see it either way. But this arrangement works for me to have a switch plus a gathering point for the various main power connections.

I used #2 cable from West Marine. It’s sold by the foot. Not cheap, but high quality marine grade. The conductors are small diameter, so it’s pretty flexible similar to welding cable. The kit comes with #4 battery cable, which is probably adequate. But many have upgraded to #2 (or larger...) and it's not a bad idea. I've never had a starting issue, hot or cold. I used Fusion battery terminals, which have pre-measured solder and flux and I like how they work. The rest of the #2 and #4 lugs are heavy duty crimp style. The terminals, HDvlugs, and shrink sleeving are all from DelCity.net. The smaller gauge terminals are from West Marine. They have a nice selection. I used regular convolute and then spiral wrapped with non-adhesive vinyl harness tape. Same treatment Ford uses on the Coyote harness. Looks a little better than the plain convolute, is easier to keep clean, and perhaps provides a little more protection.

I mentioned this is my last build, but will here again. Several years ago another forum member recommended a hydraulic crimper for this heavy duty cable work. Part number YQK70. It’s a common tool available from a number of sources. I got mine off eBay, but they're available elsewhere. Typically less than $40, which seems a little crazy. I wouldn’t call it Snap-On quality. But does the job very well. I found their recommendations for die sizes and specific AWG cable to be off. But then maybe that was because I was using mostly heavy duty lugs. But a little experimentation finds the right size to use. Comes with plenty of dies and they’re easy to change. Looks like this:


Pictures of the installation. Battery connections to power harness through engine compartment.


Down the frame rail. I measured the starter connection locations and lengths during the mockup, duplicated here. The smaller wire is the blue start wire from the Coyote controls pack. I took enough measurements and pictures during mockup to know everything here easily clears.


Firewall with Coyote PDB and related. Main power wires go to master disconnect behind this center panel.


Master disconnect behind the center panel viewed from inside cockpit with top transmission tunnel piece removed. Note I will have both this upper and lower tunnel piece removable. Also visible here is the connection to the bus bar for power connection to the RF harness.


Another view of the master disconnect inside the cockpit on the passenger side. Looked at a lot of potential locations for the switch and ended up here. Just too much congestion on the driver’s side, plus the cables routed the best here. It will end up just slightly tucked under the dash.


That’s it for wiring in the engine compartment. I’m going to get the hydraulic line for the clutch installed, and then then everything will be ready to drop the engine in.
 

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Discussion Starter #196 (Edited)
Main Power, Gen 3 Coyote Progress (continued)

Also this week I worked on the famous oil pan pickup tube for the Gen 3 Coyote. First up was to get the proper main bearing cap bolt with stud, not installed on the Gen 3 as discussed previously. Was able to get what I needed. The part numbers are: BR3Z-6345-A stud, N806180-S2 spacer, and N605904-S bolt. These are the parts next to the main bearing cap bolt they replace:


Then very carefully torqued the new bolt into position. Per Ford specs, 50 ft-lbs, then 90 degrees. Used my shiny new digital angle gauge, pictured previously. But would have been pretty simple without in this case. Used some blue Loctite on the spacer. Now it looks like a Gen 2 Coyote in that location. :p


So finally it was time to try to marry the Moroso pickup with the Modular Motorsports oil pump connector. Discussed at length earlier, so won’t go into detail again. Had plenty of time to think about this while I was gone. Last night I fabricated a connector from a piece of 4130 steel round tube, McMaster part number 89955K969. Then I tapped four 1/4-20 locations on each end for set screws. After a lot of studying, measuring, (and soul searching…) took the hacksaw to the Moroso and Modular Motorsports parts and joined them with the connector. Success! It lines up perfectly and seats properly into the oil pump. Clears the pan and windage tray just fine. Checked the pickup depth in the pan with some plumber’s putty, and all good. I have the set screws pretty tight, so nothing should move when I take it to my buddy for welding. Once welded, will take out the set screws and have him weld those shut too. I think this little saga is about over. I hope so. Once this is done, the engine will come off the stand and I’ll get the whole thing assembled. Flywheel, clutch, bell, HRB and trans. Then into the chassis.


One last item to share. On a beautiful fall day in early October (already seems like a long time ago) took #8674 out for some pictures, including on the street in our neighborhood just down from our place. Got some nice shots, so submitted one of them for the Picture of the Month (POM). Was pleased and surprised to win the October POM contest. Cool! And the $250 Factory Five gift certificate wasn’t bad either. Wasn’t planning to, but took the opportunity to splurge on the billet door handles they offer, replacing the nearly identical plastic ones provided in the kit. Also updated some of my Factory Five swag. Sweatshirt, hat, etc. These are going to look nice in the Coupe. The handles that is.

 

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Discussion Starter #197 (Edited)
Gen 3 Coyote Final Assembly

Very productive last couple of days getting the Gen 3 Coyote assembled and ready to put into the chassis. Just a couple more details to wrap up on both. Then with a little help hope to get installed. A few little challenges along the way, but I think it’s good to go.

First up was the oil pan pickup tube. That chapter is now officially closed. Had the grafted together pickup tube welded. Still lined up perfectly. I cleaned up the rubber gasket and all mating surfaces and installed using some Permatex Ultra Black at the oil pump inlet. Probably not necessary but made me feel better. That plus how the windage tray engages one side, as shown previously, I’m confident it's sealed and won’t come out. Picture of the now completed pickup tube installed, and the other picture I’ve been waiting for. The Moroso pan bolted down for the final time.



Next up I decided to tackle the Speedhut water temp and oil pressure sending units. Couple of bumps, but now complete. First the easy one. The water temp sender goes into a 3/4-inch NPT fitting in the block by the oil filter. Same as before. The FF Coyote installation kit includes an adapter. The instructions say to thread the 1/2-inch NPT adapter that comes with the gauges into this adapter. Unfortunately, the adapter included with the gauges is 3/8-inch NPT. Had this exact issue with #8674. So ordered up the same Edelmann 210926 3/4-inch NPT to 3/8-inch NPT adapter used on #8674, and installed the sender. For the oil pressure sender, the Gen 3 Coyote has some differences from previous Coyotes. I pointed this out earlier. There are two wired devices by the oil filter, not just the single oil pressure sender. Similar as it turns out to what’s on the F-150 version of the Coyote. Seen here:


Through my contact at Ford, I was able to find out that “A” is a traditional oil pressure sender. “B” is an oil control valve that decreases oil pressure at low rpm to promote fuel economy. Interesting because some of the reviews I’ve read about the Gen 3 Coyote people who’ve had previous Coyotes have commented that the oil pressure reads lower than before. Clearly Ford is looking for every possible way to increase economy. But the rest of the story is my Ford contact confirmed that neither are used by the crate motor control pack PCM program. Also upon further review I found the inlet on the oil pressure sender is a metric O-ring fitting and I was unable to find any kind of adapter to fit it. So took the bull by the horns and removed the oil filter/sender assembly from the engine (4 bolts and has an O-ring gasket, so easy) and tapped the hole to 1/4-inch NPT. No way I was going to drill and tap the hole with the piece still on the engine. Would have been nearly impossible to keep chips and such out of there. With the hole tapped, used the gauge package provided 1/4-inch NPT adapter, installed the Speedhut oil pressure sender, and it’s done. I’m leaving the oil control valve in place, even though it doesn’t do anything. Doesn’t hurt a thing and saves finding something to plug the hole. Tied the other unused lead out of the way.


With that done, time to wrap up the final driveline pieces to the engine. I had previously installed the M-7600-C pilot bearing. Set the QuickTime block plate in place, and bolted on the M-6375-M50 billet steel flywheel using a M-6379-C bolt kit. The bolts are torqued to 177 in-lbs then turned another 60 degrees in a star pattern. Sounds light, but at 60 degrees very tight. Note the addition of the pilot bearing and flywheel are necessary because the Gen 3 Coyote has the unusable (for me anyway) dual mass flywheel and no pilot bearing in the end of the crank, as discussed several times already. Previous Coyotes had a nodular flywheel, which seems to work fine. This billet steel version is 9 pounds lighter and is SFI certified. Used the same one on #8674. Nice piece.


No pictures, but next up I installed the Quicktime RM-8080 bell housing and dial indicated the opening. Because of the way the two indexing dowels on a Coyote bell housing have mounting bolts through the center, the traditional methods of adjusting with offset dowels is challenging. But still good practice to take this step and confirm where you’re at. Tremec apparently specifically says their warranty doesn’t apply unless the bell housing is indexed and in spec. Interesting. Anyway, initial measurements weren’t great. Borderline to spec and certainly not my experience with previous QuickTime bell housings. Took it back apart trying to talk myself into it being close enough. Upon disassembly, I noticed how a foil/plastic heat shield around the crank sensor was being trapped between the block plate/bell and the block. There are several of these on the Gen 3 Coyote, including the two oil sensor pieces discussed previously. Also different than before. Looking further at the available clearance and the thickness of the shield, looked like this could be a problem. Removed the heat shield, bolted everything back together, and dial indicated the opening again. Surprise! Within .002 to .003 all around. Well within spec and similar to what I’ve seen before. This picture shows the shield removed next to where it was. Obviously, there’s a reason Ford added those. But haven’t used them before so leaving them off.

 

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Discussion Starter #198 (Edited)
Gen 3 Coyote Final Assembly (continued)

Next up was the clutch. Using the same M-7560-T46 clutch as #8674. It’s actually a dual friction Centerforce part, sold by Ford Performance. It chattered a bit in the first couple hundred miles in #8674 (not unusual) but once broken in I’ve been real happy with it. Nice quality piece. Installed with a M-6397-B46 bolt and dowel kit. The bolts are torqued to 46 ft-lbs then turned another 60 degrees in a star pattern. Sounds a little heavy, compared to the flywheel, but they turned the full 60 degrees without feeling like I was forcing anything. Here’s the clutch installed, also showing a stop piece I made instead of trying to hold the front crankshaft bolt like I’ve done before. Also used it when torqueing the flywheel using one of the pressure plate bolt holes.


Then on with the bell housing. Used some blue Loctite and torqued to 50 ft/lbs.


As mentioned before, using a Tilton 60-6104 Hydraulic Release Bearing (HRB) instead of the traditional clutch arm and Ford throw-out bearing. First time for me on this, so we’ll see how it works and holds up. The installation is pretty simple. Just followed the directions. The inside sleeve is threaded and you set to end up 1/8-inch away from the clutch pressure plate fingers when fully retracted. In use, it will move out against the fingers and according to the instructions is self-adjusting. Similar to a disk brake caliper. The HRB includes an anti-rotation pin that goes into a threaded hole already in the T-56. I also removed the installed clutch arm pivot. But I'll save it. I’m using the HRB along with a Wilwood 260-10373 13/16 inch MC in the pedal box. That’s the size recommended by Tilton for this installation. The instructions are also very insistent that it have a pedal stop. So I’ll deal with that when it’s installed, bled, and checked out.



Then on the with T-56, which once lined up slid right into place. Can’t tell too much yet, but with the trans in gear the output yoke turns without any unusual drag or noises. I guess that’s good.



That's a chunk right there. My body feels it from dragging everything around for a day or two. Next step, into the chassis. But first some turkey and football, and some time spent being thankful which I truly am. For so many things. Happy Thanksgiving everyone!
 

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Discussion Starter #199
Gen 3 Coyote Installed

Big day today. With some help from a neighbor and fellow builder (Challenge Car) the Gen 3 Coyote + T-56 and related are installed into the Coupe chassis. In general, went pretty well. Took just over an hour and that was with a couple surprises. First some pictures of the installation, and then some observations and suggestions.

Used my H-F 2-ton shop crane, H-F leveler, and TD Motion Coyote lift brackets. I tried several different chain configurations, and wasn’t able to get the engine assembly to tilt down in the back as much as I would have liked and still be level side-to-side. Nothing wrong with anything, just a function of where the lift brackets attach to the engine. I used the same method as I have on previous installations though, and worked OK. I put a lift strap on the back of the trans, down under the chassis, and attached to the shop crane. Cranking this in pulls the tailshaft down and really helps make things easier to install. The other thing I did was rather than trying to move the engine stand around during the installation (not easy to move, causes the engine to start swinging) I put vehicle dollies on the four corners and move the chassis instead. Moves and controls easily. I know some guys lift the back wheels up, and that works too. But this process works for me. So, ready for the installation. Just standing there looking at it, doesn't seem like there's any way it will fit.


I added some furniture blankets all around the opening before moving the engine in. Little over an hour later, looked like this. I’ve posted similar pics during mockup. But this one’s different. This is the complete engine and trans and it’s not coming out again. :rolleyes:


One of the things discovered during mockup was that the QuickTime bell housing extended 1-1/2 inches or so below the bottom of the frame. When it was back out after mockup, trimmed the overhang and painted the cut off edge. Affected a couple of the bolts around the circle. But didn’t open it up or expose anything. Still have more beef and bolts than the non-SFI QuickTime in #8674. For my purposes, it’s more than robust enough.


Now for some observations and suggestions. First for the installation itself.

- Leave the alternator off during the installation. I had unhooked the steering column and had it (I thought) out of the way, like can be done on then Roadster. It wasn’t. We had to lift the engine back up a little and completely remove the steering column. Because of the frame configuration, one or the other can’t be installed when the engine is dropped in. When completed, the steering shaft is over the alternator. Related to this, the driver's side header can’t be installed with the alternator in place. Again because of frame members all around the area. So, leave the alternator off when dropping in the engine. Then install the header. Then the alternator.

- Remove the shifter from the transmission. Way easier to install without that in the way. Because it’s bigger, even more the case with the T-56 compared to the TKO.

- Much was written earlier in this build thread about clearance for the Direct Injection (DI) pump on the passenger side head of the Gen 3 Coyote. In summary, it fits fine once the engine is in. But it’s definitely in the way when dropping the engine down. I removed it. Not hard. Two nuts, an electrical connection, and two hoses. Also remove the outer mounting stud. It too interferes, as we found during mid-installation. Looks like this after the dust clears. I'm a little surprised to see how scratched up the powder coat looks in this picture. This area will be covered with an access panel, and looks worse in the picture than it does in person. Doesn't look nice though.


- Related to this we also had a little trouble with the curve on the TD motion lift bracket hitting the chassis side rail on the driver’s side. Somewhat because of the DI pump situation on the passenger side. But even without that, the head was tight on the passenger side and the lift bracket hit the driver's side about 1/4-inch strong. I loosened it up, and was able to get it to drop though (with some furniture blanket padding). The bracket should either have less curve out (not easy) or maybe using fewer spacers behind it on the mounts would be enough. Something to look at.

Couple other general observations:

- Best I can tell, it wouldn’t be that hard to drop the transmission out the bottom of the tunnel if needed. The tunnel is much wider and is basically open from the bell housing to the tailshaft. The bell housing bolts are all accessible. The Gen 3 Coupe uses a mounting plate for the transmission rather than an A-frame mount like the Roadster. Plus the tailshaft isn't over top of a major chassis member like the Roadster. Hopefully won’t have to try, but nice to know since taking that Coyote in and out isn’t the most fun job.

- All 16 header bolts are reasonably accessible. Nothing like the Roadster. Especially the back few on the driver’s side which are nearly impossible on the Roadster. Was happy to see that.

- Already mentioned the driver’s side header won’t go in with the alternator installed. Sort of related, the starter motor won’t go in with the passenger side header installed. So kind of the opposite. There isn't room to put it in from the bottom. And the top access is blocked by the header and footbox. In both cases, related to the chassis design and the various frame members passing through the area.

That’s it for now. Next up, after a few more details, will be to plumb and check out the Tilton HRB. I’m confident it will be fine. But just want to confirm it’s working OK before going too far on anything else. Just in case.

Next week will be the one year anniversary of the kit landing in my garage shop. Slow compared to some builders. But feel like I’ve made good progress for my building pace plus trying and doing some different things. With the engine installed, next major milestone will be to complete the cockpit wiring and then first start.
 

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Paul,

Looks great, glad it's going well. I'm always impressed with your attention to detail and build notes.
Thank you for the continuous inspiration.

Compared to me you are high-speed. I'm still trying to paint chassis mods and hang the body from the garage ceiling.

Jim
 
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