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I just put washers in to fit the hood hinge mounts. Likely you will need to trim the lower edge of the hood to increase the angle the hood opens, it hits on the rad mounts.
also getting the AC lines set up in the foot box is not easy. You found the alignment is tight but the length is also critical. I ended up with one long and one short aff by about 1/4 inch and had to remove the bulkhead bezel to get the fittings to work. If you have to get the hoses built with the lengths within about 1/16 of an inch, don't think that is realistic.
David W
 

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Discussion Starter #122
Instrument Panel and Interior

My plan for the instrument panel and interior is coming together. I’m amazed and incredibly impressed with some of the custom panels and interiors guys have come up with for the Coupe. As I’ve stated a couple times already though, I want to stay with the basic look and layout of the kit. Which is along the lines of the original. But want to clean it up and give it a little bit of a custom/sports car look. Less of a raw race car look. My plan so far is the following:


  • Vinyl on the dash top and front, with 1/8-inch foam padding on the front only. Dash will have all hidden mounts. (Kind of my thing I guess.)
  • Vinyl on the two transmission covers, with 1/8-inch foam padding, both removeable.
  • Vinyl on the gauge panel, mounted behind the dash. Removable also with hidden fasteners. No padding. Will add connectors to the harness as needed so the complete assembly can be taken out of the way to gain access to the wiring behind the dash.
  • Vinyl on the center switch panel below the dash, also no padding.
  • I’m NOT going to use the brow piece.
  • Horn button on the gauge panel, headlight switch and ignition (probably a start button) on the dash, all other switches and controls on the panel below the dash.
  • Russ Thompson column mounted turn signal switch (already received) with the momentary stalk button used for low/high beams and flash to pass. I'll be using an American Autowire electronic headlight module, same as the last two builds. My last one in stock and they aren't made any more. Too bad.
  • Details still TBD, but the switch panel will have heated seats, fog/running lights, hazards, heat and A/C controls, and the wiper/washer switch. I’m not using the FF supplied heat and A/C panel. Instead will install the provided controls in my custom panel.
  • Speedo button and Speedhut dimmer knob on the underside of the dash right below the speedo. What I’ve done on other builds and it works very well.
  • Heat and A/C outlets on the front of the dash corners (not underneath) and two added in the center, in addition to the defrost outlets.
  • Fabricated glovebox, as deep as I can make it and still have room for the wiring and all the ducts that are behind the dash.
  • LED downlights on the underside of the dash corners, on the courtesy lighting circuit (headlight knob twist).
  • Locations for the master disconnect, aux power, and USB power still TBD. Thinking right now the master disconnect will be under the dash but still accessible, and the two power outlets on the ends of the center switch panel. We’ll see.
  • Door cards with pockets. Design TBD. Would also like some kind of door pull. We’ll see about that.
  • Kit provided carpet everywhere else and will have floor mats made. Not aware Factory Five is offering any for this kit.
For the covering material, right now planning to use vinyl. I used leather on #8674 and like it a lot. But that was also driven by the provided leather seats, plus it’s a little more work. For this build, I’m going to also kind of follow the theme of the seats, in this case the Corbeau Sportline Evolution-X seats I selected and have shown earlier. The seats are mostly black vinyl. The usual slightly pebbly variety. I’ll find some material that matches it as closely as possible. Lots of choices there. There are several contrasting panels in a vinyl carbon fiber pattern in the seats. And then the red stitching. Corbeau sells the materials used in their seats by the yard, so I ordered a yard of the carbon fiber material. I couldn’t find anything that looked like a good match anywhere else, and didn’t want to take a chance since the pattern is pretty distinctive. For starters, I’m going to use this carbon fiber like vinyl on the gauge panel, the center switch panel, and accent panels in the door cards. Additionally, I’m going to have the red stitching in the seats duplicated along the top/front edge of the dash, the corners of the transmission covers, and also in the door cards. May looking at putting some of the carbon fiber like vinyl elsewhere (glovebox maybe?) but don’t want to overdue it. Hopefully will give an overall coordinated and similar style look.

So that’s the plan. Subject to change of course (isn’t everything?) but where I’m headed. Last night dove in and made a new panel for the gauges. It’s patterned after the kit supplied piece, but with several changes. Made from .063 thick aluminum (versus .040) so it’s a little more solid, tweaked the tach and speedo locations slightly to give the best sight lines through the steering wheel, adjusted the hole size of the smaller gauges so the adapter ring is on the back versus the front, and will be adjusting the hole size for the steering column so it fits closely around the Russ Thompson turn signal assembly. Right now I just have a slot for the steering column, but will make the final cut matched to the turn signal when I get further along. I’ll be wrapping this in vinyl as described, so the hole sizes are all slightly oversized to allow the vinyl to pull through and be glued on the back side. I used an adjustable circle cutter in my drill press to make the holes. With a little cutting oil, works pretty well. Here’s a picture of the new piece over top of the kit supplied piece. Tentatively also showing locations for LED indicators for the Coyote MIL and fan (I like an indicator showing when it’s running) and the horn button. The turn signal and high beam indicators are built into the GPS speedo. I’m going to rivet a right angle piece along the bottom edge to give a little more stiffness and will also be part of the mounting.


Had a nice 60 degree day last week so #8674 came out of hibernation of its first drive of the season. Other than needing a couple pounds of air in the tires, everything was perfect. Started right up and ran like a champ. Man I like that car. Can’t wait for the real driving season to start. We’re doing an ice storm today. Just crazy.
 

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That sounds like quite a master plan for the cockpit!

My Gen II panel and cockpit is much more conventional (for me that means "doable"). I have posted a bunch of pictures on my recent posts. I also put the details on my door pull (which is from a Jeep) in a recent post. This is bolted through the upper bar of the door frame so it is quite solid. This may not be fancy enough for what you are envisioning!

I put my master disconnect just aft of the transmission tunnel (just behind the elbow when seated). This is a very visible location but also conveniently between the battery and the starter / everything else.

I am looking to seeing your panel!

Keith
Coupe 648
 

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Discussion Starter #124
That sounds like quite a master plan for the cockpit!

My Gen II panel and cockpit is much more conventional (for me that means "doable"). I have posted a bunch of pictures on my recent posts. I also put the details on my door pull (which is from a Jeep) in a recent post. This is bolted through the upper bar of the door frame so it is quite solid. This may not be fancy enough for what you are envisioning!

I put my master disconnect just aft of the transmission tunnel (just behind the elbow when seated). This is a very visible location but also conveniently between the battery and the starter / everything else.

I am looking to seeing your panel!

Keith
Coupe 648
Thanks for your comments. You're talking "conventional" when you put in a sunroof in your Coupe? :001_smile:

Attaching the door pull to the door frame is good input. Thanks for that. The Gen 3 Coupe has the battery in the front. So I'm expecting the master disconnect to be somewhere in the dash area. Still one of the many details to be worked out.
 

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Looking good Paul.



You are on the right track with the doors.

You first want to hang the frames and make that work.

Remove the frames.

Then hang the body

Put the frames back on and fit the skins in the body opening.

Then mount to the frames.



John


I wish I had done mine that way. It seems like a much better plan than my methodology turned out to be.

Looking great!
 

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Discussion Starter #126
More Instrument Panel

This picture looks pretty similar to pictures I’ve posted before while mocking up the dash. But this has a big difference. This is with my newly fabricated gauge panel, everything placed, and dash mounting determined.


Here’s another view.


And another showing how I was able to get the Russ Thompson turn signal assembly tucked in pretty well.


Now for some details about the work completed to get to this point. First a disclaimer. The stock Factory Five dash setup is fine. It’s well thought out, everything fits, and provides a nice result. I just went at it with a few additional parameters, which I have to say resulted in quite a lot of extra work. It’s not for everyone and for some may not be worth it. Just want to put that out there. None of this is meant to be negative toward Factory Five. Just my own need for punishment I guess.

My first design goal, mentioned before, was to put the gauge panel behind the dash rather than mounted on the front. That actually turned out to be pretty easy. As pictured, at the top the panel slides between the back of the dash and the front of the 3/4-inch dash mounting tube. Then I have three 10-32 nutserts under the bottom edge to hold it in place. It will be pretty easy to drop the fully populated gauge panel out of the dash which gives wide access to the under dash area. Well, sort of easy. It will be necessary to unbolt the steering shaft bearing (reachable) and drop the steering wheel/turn signal assembly out of the way. Also will be necessary to remove the center switch panel that I’ll be adding. But it’s all doable from what I can see so far.

My second design goal, also mentioned before, is to have the dash mounting hidden. The ends were pretty easy. I riveted those in place with flush rivets, which will be hidden under the dash covering. Showed that before. The bigger challenge though was how to attach the dash to the 3/4-inch dash tube that spans from side-to-side. Unlike the Roadster, the dash piece is a large bent panel that includes not only the vertical dash itself but also the horizontal fill panel up to the windshield. This piece rests on the dash tube and the firewall which provides all the structural support. So however it’s attached only needs to keep it from sliding back. I stared at it for quite a while. Kept coming back to using right angle pieces attached to the back of the dash that could be screwed to the dash tube. Same as what I’ve done on Roadster builds. But couldn’t come up with locations that would be accessible to reach from behind to install/remove the screws. Then it hit me. I have four access panels on the dash already! The four heat/A-C vents. That’s way too easy. I ended up attaching three pieces of aluminum 3/4-inch angle stock to the back of the dash. Held in place with 6-32 flat head screws that will be buried under the covering. One at each end right behind the vents. And one in the center between the two vents. They’re spaced to fit tight against the underside of the dash tube. I’ll put nutserts in the dash tube (it’s pretty thin material) and be able to install/remove the screws through the vent holes. Some work needed to reach and remove the vents should it be necessary, but like the gauge panel, is doable. With the access provided with the gauge panel removed, I’m really not expecting to need to remove the dash once it’s installed. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

Here are pictures of the back side of the reworked dash with the mounting points plus the newly fabricated gauge panel. As pictured before, I put the end heat/A-C vents in the front of the dash rather than through the bottom as Factory Five shows. They fit, but it’s really tight. Then added the two in the middle. Note the right angle pieces I put around the bottom of the gauge panel. That plus being made out of thicker material (.063) it’s nice and stiff. You can also see the attachment points for the gauge panel along the bottom edge.



Next up is the glovebox. I’m planning to pretty much duplicate the method I used to make the glovebox for #8674. I’ll wrap sheet metal around some wood forms, add an aluminum back, an aluminum ring around the front, and bolt to the back of the dash opening. I’ll do a flush door also like #8674, covered with the same material as the dash. After that, will finalize the removable transmission tunnel covers and the center switch panel. I received the carbon fiber like vinyl covering from Corbeau that matches the panels in the seats. Looks like nice material. Made a couple small test panels and I think it’s going to work well and look good. I’m planning to cover the gauge panel as soon as the rest of the dash fabrication is completed.

Couple other brief updates. Received my “free” shift ball from Tremec. Found a Lokar shifter boot that I liked, and put together with the FF shifter trim ring. For the e-brake, couldn’t find a boot that seemed like it would work, so I asked FF what they used in their prototypes. They said they used the side mounted Roadster one and made it work. Which they included with the Coupe kit. So, found a Lokar trim ring that was the right size, and cut down the FF boot and glued to the bottom of the ring. It’s not perfect, but it's OK. I put 10-32 nutserts in the transmission tunnel cover in the right places and these are ready to install when the time comes.


Finally, similar to previous builds, got out the Fiebing’s leather finishing materials and dyed the door check straps. This is another one of those little touches that makes the car look more finished IMO.


That’s it. I think we finally have warmer weather here to stay. I put gas conditioner in the snow blower and banished it to the back of the garage. I'm done with that. My wife and I went on a nice cruise in #8674 today. Good to be out. Local events are starting up next weekend and into May. Ready to get back at it.
 

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Looking good indeed. I’m jealous of your beautiful air conditioning plumbing! (My drysump system pushed that off the plausibility list...).

Your build looks to be very well planned out and executed. Great job!
 

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Discussion Starter #130 (Edited)
Glovebox

Busy week so not as much shop time. With warmer weather comes yard work. But did manage to get the glovebox mostly fabricated. I used very similar materials and methods as #8674, the same depth, but a different shape. I made three internal forms out of leftover shelf stock MDF bolted together with spacers between, a back out of .040 aluminum, and a front ring out of .090 aluminum. The sides are galvanized steel duct material from Home Depot. First wrapped the sides around the forms with about a 2-inch lap at the top held for now with JB Weld. Then a bunch of pie cuts and bent over onto the back. Then more pie cuts and bent around the front ring. Right now the back and front ring are also held together at the bends with JB Weld. Once it’s installed, the front ring will be bolted through the dash, and the lap on the top will have bolts from the latch. The back isn't going anywhere. Once it was done, wasn’t too easy to get the forms out. Ended up drilling holes in them and they broke pretty easily.

Then made the cutout in the dash, drilled mounting holes, and temporarily bolted into place. Still need to countersink the screws into the face of the dash. They’ll be buried under the dash covering. The glovebox will be removed while the covering is applied, with the covered wrapped through the opening and glued onto the back of the dash. The interior of the glovebox will also be covered, and that wrapped onto the front lip. Then bolted in placed with a nice finished transition when open. The door will be two pieces of .040 aluminum wrapped with covering and sandwiched together. I’m using the same 173167 Richelieu cabinet hinges from Lowes as #8674, which were also on #7750 from Alex’s Custom Roadster. Their a little chunky, but work very well and have the perfect geometry to lift and drop the zero clearance door out of the opening. I looked at a couple other possibilities but came back to those. Also using the same VW 111857131L pull/lock as #8674. Read about that one on the forum quite some time ago, and it’s also perfect for this application. Available lots of places. This one was $20 shipped from eBay.

Here is the mostly finished glovebox installed in the dash.


In the chassis with a very temporarily mounted door half. When finally fitted and covered, the door will be completely flush with the face of the dash.


Interior checking the operation of the hinges, mounted temporarily with double back tape. As mentioned before, the mounting screws still need to be countersunk. I used maybe more screws than necessary. But once I had the hole cut, took a pretty big divot out of the dash and it was a little floppy. So using enough screws so that the glovebox puts some strength back into it. Feels solid.


This is the VW latch that will be installed in the door. I like it because the latch is spring loaded and is just push to close. To open, press the button and pull. The lock is only needed if you actually want to lock it. Some other latches require the key all the time. This one doesn’t.


I saw this in the shop while making the glovebox, and got a chuckle. I seem to be in the upper range of the “how many clecos does it take” contest. What about a new category? How many clamps does it take? This is gluing the front ring on the glovebox after bending the metal over onto it. The scrap piece of MDF is to make sure it ends up flat. Maybe I got a little carried away.


Most of the remaining work on the glovebox will be when it’s covered and then fitted for final assembly. Next up is the center switch console. With that fabricated, my dash will be nearing completion and ready for covering.

My Gen 3 Coupe update box arrived this week from Factory Five. Contained several updated aluminum panels, one pair of new aluminum panels, and updated hinges for the hatch. The good news is none of the panels that I’ve drilled and fit were included. Which is what I expected based on some advance information. One of the pieces was mounted for shipping. But the rest were from the loose aluminum box. The four pieces are: (1) Replacement front wheel rear lower splash. New pieces are quite different. (2) Replacement upper engine bay splash guards. The ones that are mounted inside the nose. Only minor changes. (3) New pieces, not received before, to mount in the front of the rear wheel well. Covers several openings in that area. (4) Replacement front wheel inside splash panels. These are the ones that were previously mounted. No big deal. In this picture the old piece is still mounted and the new piece below. The main difference is opening up the area where the headers exit. I’ve seen this mentioned in other builds where guys have cut the piece above the opening off. Now it's official I guess.


The revised hatch hinges apparently allow it to open further. I did have the old ones powder coated already. Oh well. Will include the new ones in my next batch. Thanks Factory Five for making continued improvements to the Gen 3 Coupe and supplying the updated parts to those of us who’ve already taken delivery. My understanding is they shipped 60 or so of these update boxes.

Big shoutout to my buddies at the 2018 Huntington Beach Cruise-In this weekend! Some day I’ll have to make it out to that event. I grew up not too far from there. This weekend we have a big Cars and Coffee to kick off the season. This one typically has 1000+ cars and is pretty crazy. Ford Performance is one of the features of this months event. Weather looks cool but so far dry. Looking forward to getting out.
 

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Hi Ed, Great glove box design and fab execution, I'm impressed! Not having seen your roadster build and how you did the glove box earlier could you please explain to me the final assemble again. you mentioned the glove box will be removed to wrap the dash and interior of the box, then bolted together. How do you install the counter sunk glove box screws if the dash is already covered? What did I miss? Do you epoxy the screws in place first thru the dash so you only have to tighten the nuts during the assembly and hope the screws don't turn?

From the photo, the door and the opening look almost line on line, nice cutting! However, is there enough circumferential gap to accommodate both the dash wrap and the door wrap or will you just trim the door size to fit as you go? I'm really enjoying following your build and all of your amazing ideas!
Best regards,
Bob Mac
 

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Discussion Starter #132 (Edited)
Hi Ed, Great glove box design and fab execution, I'm impressed! Not having seen your roadster build and how you did the glove box earlier could you please explain to me the final assemble again. you mentioned the glove box will be removed to wrap the dash and interior of the box, then bolted together. How do you install the counter sunk glove box screws if the dash is already covered? What did I miss? Do you epoxy the screws in place first thru the dash so you only have to tighten the nuts during the assembly and hope the screws don't turn?

From the photo, the door and the opening look almost line on line, nice cutting! However, is there enough circumferential gap to accommodate both the dash wrap and the door wrap or will you just trim the door size to fit as you go? I'm really enjoying following your build and all of your amazing ideas!
Best regards,
Bob Mac
Hi Bob. Good questions. Try not to go too far with details, but obviously I left some out since it's not clear what I did. Yes, the glovebox will be removed while coving is applied. I will epoxy the flat head screws into the dash and use some flat-style speed nuts on the back. Good old JB Weld again, which I use as a filler to make sure the head of the screw is completely flat and buried. The speed nuts are thin enough to absorb into the two layers of covering. After covering, will put the glovebox back on and tighten the nuts from the back. I've found screws temporarily mounted like this work OK. But still can be a little fragile until the assembly is completed. Obviously would not be good if they came loose or started to spin under the covering. I install the nuts very carefully and the 6-32 bolt is long enough that I can grab the end of it when tightening everything up. Once assembled, shouldn't need to be taken apart again. Yes, the door pieces will be re-sized to take the covering into account on the dash and the doors themselves. I intentionally made them the exact size of the opening at first to use as a pattern for the cutout.

Don't know how much they help, but here are pictures from the similarly made glovebox on #8674. First is the fabricated box from the front with the tabs bent over and glued to the .090 aluminum ring. Didn't get a similar picture for this build.


Covered and door final installation. Expect the Coupe will be very similar.


 

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Thanks Ed, I should have known better to ask. With the thoughtfulness and precise execution you demonstrate, that some thing as simple as what I asked would have been throughly thought out previously. Sorry to have bothered you, but thanks for your time repeating your methodology.
Bob Mac
 

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Discussion Starter #134
Thanks Ed, I should have known better to ask. With the thoughtfulness and precise execution you demonstrate, that some thing as simple as what I asked would have been throughly thought out previously. Sorry to have bothered you, but thanks for your time repeating your methodology.
Bob Mac
Thanks, but no bother! If my answers sounded like it, I apologize. I enjoy questions. Shows people are reading and trying to understand my ramblings.
 

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Ed, thanks for the extra pictures, you do beautiful work! Which of course leads me to 2 more questions. Why did you choose to use galvanize material for the sides of the box and not aluminum, strength vs thickness? What did you use to bond the two haves of the front door together, looks like a real beautiful professional secure sandwiched finished product.
thanks, Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #136 (Edited)
Ed, thanks for the extra pictures, you do beautiful work! Which of course leads me to 2 more questions. Why did you choose to use galvanize material for the sides of the box and not aluminum, strength vs thickness? What did you use to bond the two haves of the front door together, looks like a real beautiful professional secure sandwiched finished product.
thanks, Bob
Thanks! The galvanized sheet duct material bends easily around the wood form giving the shape of the glovebox. But more importantly, bends easily with multiple pie cuts around the back wall and the front mounting ring. The usual .040 aluminum in the kits wouldn't bend nearly so easily for this. Much thinner aluminum, like flashing material, could be a candidate. But it's not quite as stiff or strong. The galvanized duct material works great for this and is just the right strength. I think the piece I bought at Home Depot was around $6, and was more than enough for two pieces. Which I needed because I messed up the first piece. Conveniently not pictured. :rolleyes:

The two halves of the door from my Roadster build both have the covering wrapped around onto the back (inside), held with contact cement. When it was time to put the two together, used contact cement where the covering material met, a couple large dollops of JB Weld in the open area, plus the latch assembly provides a mechanical connection between the two sides. Hope that makes sense. Easier to do than to describe. Ends up a solid piece and plenty strong as a glovebox door. Planning the exact method for the Coupe.
 

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Discussion Starter #137 (Edited)
Instrument Panel Again

Slow going, but made some good progress I think since the last update. My instrument panel is coming together. First up was to fabricate the center switch panel described previously. It will fit between the bottom of the dash and rest on the front transmission tunnel cover. Made a template from file folder stock (that’s what it’s for, right?) and cut out the aluminum piece.


Then with a little persuasion on the brake plus a little more since it was beyond its capability, had the shape I was looking for. Used .040 5052 aluminum. First because I had some and it’s easy to work with. Plus that front bend might be a little too much for 6061. I didn’t try to bend tabs on the seams where it joins. Just didn’t trust that I could do it accurately enough, plus added more complexity to the bending. I flush riveted corner pieces on each end later to tie it together. Not pictured here.


DriDrilled holes in each end for the USB and auxiliary outlets, and mocked up under the dash. Happy with how it turned out. It will be attached to the tunnel cover and the front edge of the dash. Will hold it in place, plus give some support and solidity to the dash itself. Also in this picture is the new front transmission tunnel cover I made. Once again was faced with whether it was easier to mod the existing part or make new. I chose the latter. I wanted the center transmission cover (the one with the shifter and e-brake) to fit over a tab on the front cover. That way the center piece can be removed without removing the front one since I’m going to have them both removeable. Factory Five has it the opposite, requiring the front cover to be removed before the center cover (not easy with the switch panel and dash resting on it), and IMO should consider changing it. I could have spliced a piece on. But chose to make a whole new one. It was slightly more work but a little cleaner. The front cover will be held at the top with screws (vs. rivets) into the 2x2 frame tube and the tab at the bottom. The center cover will be held with screws through the sides. Just not an easy way to make the screws hidden like on #8674. But it will be OK.


Next moved to covering the gauge cluster panel. Here I’m using the sorta C-F looking vinyl that I got from Corbeau that matches panels in my seats mentioned previously. The material is a nice quality cloth backed vinyl with an added layer of open cell foam and another cloth layer. For this purpose, don’t want the added foam so pulled off the back cloth layer and scraped off the foam. Leaving just the top cloth backed vinyl. I would normally use my standard go-to DAP Weldwood Landau contact cement, but none on hand and not sure how much I’ll really need for this build. Only comes in gallons and isn't cheap. So instead used Weldwood Gel Formula contact cement. Stock item at Lowes. Doesn’t set up as quickly as the Landau, but for this purpose worked fine. After lots of gluing and cutting, got it covered. Put the gauges, lights and switches in and of course first thing had to see what it looked like all lit up. I like it.


The two small LED’s from Watson’s Streetworks are quite a bit brighter than the three LED’s in the Speedhut speedo. The red will be the MIL from the Coyote, so I’m OK if it’s bright. If it’s on, needs to get immediate attention. The amber light is my “fan running” indicator and I’ll tone it down a bit with a resister. Easy to do when things get wired up. Speaking of wiring, just a little bit of work to do on the backside.


Here’s how it looks installed in the dash.


Wider shot showing the newly fabricated center switch panel with my simulated switches. With things finalized, need to get those ordered. The center switch panel will have the same C-F style vinyl. Everything else will be standard pebbled vinyl with some red stitching as described previously.



Still more to do, but it’s getting there. Real happy with how it's turning out so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #138
Driveshaft Safety Loop

Bit of a slow week on the build. Have managed to get a few smaller tasks done that were on my list but are neither very noteworthy or photogenic. In addition, spent some time mounting the A/C condenser in front of the radiator. Kind of mixed and matched a little with the parts provided in the kit, but it worked out OK. Decided it was best to have the lower hose stay inside the radiator tunnel rather than the go around the outside like the top hose. Just worked better plus avoided interference with the frame and sheet metal in that area that I mentioned in a previous update. The instructions say to go on whichever side works best. My main accomplishment was getting a driveshaft safety loop installed.

Before that, thought I would share a picture from a car show last Monday. For the last couple of years our club, Great Lakes Cobra Club, has supported a car show at a local high school technical campus. Automotive Technology is one of their programs. They have a shop with multiple lifts, bunch of great equipment, an extensive welding area, and body shop with a mixing booth and beautiful downdraft paint booth. Would be a killer place to work on our builds! Anyway, each year they invite local clubs to bring their cars and interact with the students. The date had to be rescheduled due to rain, but the new date was beautiful and sunny. Probably affected the turnout a bit, but still was good. All of the students, not just the automotive groups, are allowed to come out and check things over. I had good old #8674 there. Along with my usual car show sign, had another that I made for Autorama last year with a number of construction pictures and descriptions. That turned out to be very interesting for the students and led to some good interaction and promoting our hobby with the younger set. Here’s my Roadster between my club buddies Superformance and a brand new Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat. Obviously before the crowds arrived.


For the driveshaft safety loop, looked at several options and decided to get the rather generic one available at Summit, Jegs, etc. Seems solid enough and best I could tell from catalog dimensions, would fit in the Coupe chassis. So ordered it from Jegs (Summit was out of stock) and just finished the install. Easiest would have been to bolt it on from the bottom. Even though it would have been pretty minimal, just couldn’t bring myself to interrupt that nice smooth chassis bottom or having anything hanging lower than the frame. So mounted it on top. Trimmed it to fit between the cockpit floor sheet metal and installed three heavy duty 5/16-inch rivet nuts on each side. Took a little time because the location for the rivet nuts wasn’t real handy, even with all the panels removed. But it’s done and I’m satisfied it’s very rigid and strong. Hopefully it will never be needed.

Trimmed, new holes drilled, ready for installation.


Installation completed, viewed from the top.


From the bottom.


Also this week took all the aluminum panels off except for the front foot boxes. Just a few pieces left there to fit and drill. Will finish those up when I pull the engine/trans mockup out in the near future. Then everything off to powder coat.


This weekend we’re off for Texas to visit our youngest son and daughter-in-law. So the build will take a week or so off. Enjoying the build a bunch. But a break every once in a while is good too.
 

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Discussion Starter #139 (Edited)
Back At It

As updates goes, this one is especially minor. After a great week+ away visiting family in Texas, back home in (much cooler!) Michigan now. Had some things to do once we got back including hacking through my yard. But last couple of days started back on the Coupe build so will report in.

With all the sheet metal gone, set the gas tank back in place and made up the SS flex lines between the pump hangar and the 3/8-inch rigid SS. Used Aeroquip TFE Racing Hose and Aeroquip FBM1103 -6 AN PTFE Racing Hose Ends. I’ve used these parts several times before and assembly is pretty straightforward. I’ve never tested before installation and haven’t ever had a problem. But decided this time to up my game a little and test them after assembly. Picked up a Fragola Performance Systems 900666 AN hose pressure test kit. Pretty simple setup with a plug for one end, and fitting with a Schrader valve for the other end. With the plugs in place, put in 70 PSI of compressed air (Coyote runs at around 55 PSI) and dunked in water. No bubbles is good. All passed OK. I didn’t quite tighten one test fitting all the way, and sure enough a solid stream of bubbles when dunked. Nice peace of mind knowing they should be good when gas is added.

Just a quick editorial comment. Not real hard to notice I didn’t use any of the kit provided fuel line components. Nothing wrong with them, and many use them just fine. But my choice was to go a little different direction and what I’ve done on the last three builds. What this shows is what happens once you start down the slippery slope of changes. First up is using rigid 3/8 SS for both supply and return (kit is steel 5/16 and 1/4). Then going with the full 3/8 Pro-M pump hangar which has -6 AN fittings. Then going with the larger Trick Flow fuel filter. Pretty soon you’re all in with -AN fittings and SS flex and the rest is history. All the kit parts get left in the boxes. The final result is a very robust and (hopefully) lifetime quality fuel system that should easily handle the Coyote. So far so good with a nearly exact setup on #8674. But much of this is a personal choice, stuff I like to do, and isn’t meant as a negative toward the kit components. Similar comments could be made about my choice to also use rigid SS for the brake lines. Ok, back to the build.

Here are the installed fuel lines, and also now finally routed and anchored the rear harness with a few more padded clamps and 3/16-inch rivets. It’s offset to one side to stay clear of the trunk box shown previously.



Also finalized the routing for the rear harness along the back of the chassis. Plenty of wire on the passenger side. Just enough on the driver’s side. Next step is hook up the lights when the body goes on.


Spent several hours today taking things apart getting ready to remove the mock-up engine block and transmission assembly. Then will finish fitting and drilling the last of the aluminum panels and get everything over to the powder coater. This isn’t much of a picture, but shows how the radiator needs to be out in order for the 2-ton HF hoist to reach far enough into the engine compartment. Also shows the newly installed modified front inner splash guards received in the update package from Factory Five.


Spent some time over the last couple weeks studying the various products available for a keyless pushbutton start setup. Decided to go with the pretty simple Digital Guard Dawg PBS-I. Ordered it direct since I wanted something other than their standard start button. So don’t have it yet. But when I do, will test and do a write-up about it plus some of the other electronic aspects of the build. It’s pretty interesting when you line it all up to see how much technology there is in a 60’s era replica when using modern stuff. More later.
 

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Looking GREAT Paul!

You're going to like the DGD system; it's really slick. Be advised that there is a learning curve for quick restarts (like if you stall in the parking lot or at a red light); you have to lift off the brake momentarily before pushing the button. But once you know the trick & practice a bit it's easy enough.

Cheers,


John
 
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