Factory Five Racing Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Junior Charter Member
Joined
·
2,071 Posts
How much do want to spend

Detour:

If you want to go first class and spend a little more time building connectors that are water proof, corrosion and vibration proof, go with Weather Packs. Pricey but factory reliable. You need both the connectors and a tool for the pins.

https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=7286

https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=6033

https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=5737

If you don't want to spend the big bucks use trailer connectors. Cheap and work well. Put some dialectric grease on the contacts to prevent corrosion and keep water out. NAPA stores have these in stock.

Molded Connectors Without Loop - Trailer Wire Connectors

Molded Connectors With Loop - Trailer Wire Connectors

Ron
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
I used weatherpack connectors purchased from Waytek.

They have various pin configurations, are weather tight, and pretty easy to assemble with the proper tool.

I highly recommend them. Here's an example from their catalog:

Waytek Catalog 225

And it looks like Waytek is WAY cheaper than Pegasus.
 

·
Blue Oval Scribe
Joined
·
9,175 Posts
If you only need a couple getting them from the above sources is good (but watch shipping charges). I've used this kit before as a solution for wiring whole cars. Not sure if it is cheaper in the long run, but saves a lot of time making sure you have the right terminals, seals, etc.

460 Piece Weather Pack Kit DIYAutoTune.com

HTH...
Mark
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,683 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,402 Posts
dito - del city or waytek. for sure get the extraction tool ....and if you are going to do a ton of connections you might as well get the crimper. personally I went with weatherpaks and a 37 pin AMP connector for a dash quick disconnect. bunch of wiring stuff on my website
 

·
Junior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,146 Posts
One of the criteria of a connector is how many times it's rated to come apart without damage.

The automotive industry used weatherpak. They plan to put the car together on the assembly line, possibly make one repair under warranty, and have the owner leave well enough alone for 10-15 years. They are rated at 10 disconnects.

If you have worked on older cars since their introduction, 10 disconnects is usually a joke. They fall apart after the first one. The plastic becomes brittle with age, and it's a common problem to discover corrosion creeping into the connection after ten years.

The race car guys building endurance cars, or those being used in an extreme environment like the Bonneville Salt Flats seem to consistently avoid weatherpak. They tend to use Deutch DT or DTM, which are rated at 100 disconnects. For a long term heirloom car, upgrading the wiring harness to marine/aviation grade helps a lot. If there is one thing restorers face in cars over 30 years old, it's being forced to replace the factory wiring harnesses. They simply will not function properly after that long.

Considering the large amount of low voltage circuits running sensor feeds to the EFI or body computer, it's not getting any better. Wiring problems are a known issue in factory cars, they've even published TSB's on how to fix it by bypassing the harness to directly feed sensor inputs into the computers.

Give it some thought - if expensive hose is your choice for running fluids, then scraping by on donor wire or automotive grade connectors isn't equivalent. It's like running a titanium space frame chassis with rat rod horse blanket upholstery. Since the car will need a good electrical system much more than some bling hose, it's far more important to use high quality wiring and connectors.

Auto wiring is the lowest tier in the transportation industry, and doesn't even make the grade in a powerboat, much less flying or military use. There's a reason for that - they want to sell you another car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
901 Posts
You need to be careful soldering wires. If a soldered wire is allowed to move around during service there is a good chance the wire will break inside the insulation and can be very difficult to track down. You should use some type of strain relief such as several layers of shrink tubing or tied in a bundle so it can’t bend.

Bill Lomenick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
You need to be careful soldering wires. If a soldered wire is allowed to move around during service there is a good chance the wire will break inside the insulation and can be very difficult to track down. You should use some type of strain relief such as several layers of shrink tubing or tied in a bundle so it can’t bend.

Bill Lomenick
Trick with proper soldering is the minimal use of heat and material. You don't want the solder to wick past the wire end of the connector. It will make the wire brittle.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top