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Discussion Starter #1
The side frames of my windshield are not parallel with each other, they are both angled out about 10 degrees. Seems like they need to be parallel to bolt up to the mounts on the frame. They are mated up with the side of the windshield, in what seems like the correct way. I have tried to bend the sideframes in a vice with no luck. I don't think it is a good idea to let the end of the windshield flex. Anybody have any ideas?

Dennis
 

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Lets See...

If I'm reading you correctly.

The support posts mount to the chassis, at that point the posts have a vertical section that extends up to the body. Just above the body the posts bend in about 8* on each side to fit with the shape of the windshield frame. The support posts should be parallel to each other where they are vertical.

I can't tell much from the picture.

Regards, Rick.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If I'm reading you correctly.

The support posts mount to the chassis, at that point the posts have a vertical section that extends up to the body. Just above the body the posts bend in about 8* on each side to fit with the shape of the windshield frame. The support posts should be parallel to each other where they are vertical.

I can't tell much from the picture.

Regards, Rick.
I was having trouble getting a picture of the issue. The windshield is laying flat/horizontally on a table, you can see short dimension of the side frame should be straight up and down.

Vertically, they are close to parallel, I think I can bend them in that direction if i need to.

The problem is when I hold the windshield in place, the side frames are not parallel from the front to back of the car. If I install and tighten, it will tend to want to bend the windshield ends, which I think is a bad idea.
 

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If I'm understanding correctly... how much do you think they're off? Within reason, unless the frame or glass are somehow warped, I'm not sure it's a problem. There is a little bit of flex in the assembly. I don't know if it's the glass itself or the glass in the frame with the rubber gasket, but it is possible to move the arms separate from each other in the front/back plane you're describing. For example, when installing the windshield, after one side is bolted at the proper angle, it's still necessary to confirm the other side is at the proper angle and it will move around pretty easily before bolting to the right angle. Again, within reason.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If I'm understanding correctly... how much do you think they're off? Within reason, unless the frame or glass are somehow warped, I'm not sure it's a problem. There is a little bit of flex in the assembly. I don't know if it's the glass itself or the glass in the frame with the rubber gasket, but it is possible to move the arms separate from each other in the front/back plane you're describing. For example, when installing the windshield, after one side is bolted at the proper angle, it's still necessary to confirm the other side is at the proper angle and it will move around pretty easily before bolting to the right angle. Again, within reason.

The front of the vertical bar is 1/4" outboard from the back, the vertical bar is 1-1/2" wide, by my math that is 9.5 degrees. Both sides are the same. It will flex in if i tighten it, but what is bending is the channel that holds the edge of the glass. Seems like putting that sort of stress on the glass is not good.
 

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What you are seeing is quite typical. When thinking of it as if the windshield was to be mounted vertically the "twist" (or lack thereof) is deceiving because when it is laid back at the final angle it is a non issue. The important thing to remember is that the windshield must remain totally relaxed once installed. If the windshield frame "legs" do not fit the chassis mounts snugly you need to use shims to take up any gaps. If you just tighten the bolts to draw the legs into the chassis mounts you're pretty much guaranteeing that you'll have a cracked windshield in your future. I have a variety of 1/2" slot body & fender shims in 1/16" and 1/8" thicknesses that I use for filling the voids:



With their open end it's a heck of a lot easier to insert the bolts then slip these shims between the leg and chassis mount than it is to try to finagle a washer or two into place and get the bolt through them, the leg and the mount.

Good luck!

Jeff
 

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What you are seeing is quite typical. When thinking of it as if the windshield was to be mounted vertically the "twist" (or lack thereof) is deceiving because when it is laid back at the final angle it is a non issue. The important thing to remember is that the windshield must remain totally relaxed once installed. If the windshield frame "legs" do not fit the chassis mounts snugly you need to use shims to take up any gaps. If you just tighten the bolts to draw the legs into the chassis mounts you're pretty much guaranteeing that you'll have a cracked windshield in your future. I have a variety of 1/2" slot body & fender shims in 1/16" and 1/8" thicknesses that I use for filling the voids:



With their open end it's a heck of a lot easier to insert the bolts then slip these shims between the leg and chassis mount than it is to try to finagle a washer or two into place and get the bolt through them, the leg and the mount.

Good luck!

Jeff
Ditto- additional tip.. Assemble the car completely and install the shims as Jeff has indicated.

When the car comes apart for paint I drill a hole in the shims in place. Then run a sheet metal screw into them to hold them in place for reassembly. Make sure the head of the bolt is on the chassis side and low enough to clear the head of the bolt for tightening. Then Dremel off the remaining threads flush with the shim. This prevents lots of fu...... Fiddling with shims .:001_rolleyes:
 

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More Input...

The front of the vertical bar is 1/4" outboard from the back, the vertical bar is 1-1/2" wide, by my math that is 9.5 degrees. Both sides are the same. It will flex in if i tighten it, but what is bending is the channel that holds the edge of the glass. Seems like putting that sort of stress on the glass is not good.
Carefully remove the support posts from the windshield frame.

Mount the support posts to the chassis. Use C-clamps if the mounting holes are not drilled.

Insure the support posts are parallel front to back where they attach to the chassis, and the upper section above the body line.

With help, hold the windshield frame in place and see how it fits to the support posts. Check the fit to the side of the frame (including the curve at the top, for both radius and alignment of the tip).

There is a relief machined in the front of the support posts to accommodate the angle the end of the windshield frame creates where it attaches to the support posts. Note that the screws that hold the windshield frame to the support posts (the ones that go into the brass strips) will be perpendicular to the end of the windshield frame, and are not square to the side surface of the support posts.

If the windshield frame does not fit where it should, the support posts can be bent to make them align. Put the bottom of the posts in a padded vise jaw and bend the part that is between the body and the chassis mount with a padded, large (12"), adjustable wrench. Putting the shims, as described earlier, in is an alternative, but the side surface of the support post (and the little aluminum cover plates) will then look out of alignment with the body.

If the body is on, the height of the support posts needs to be checked to insure clearance from the bottom of the windshield frame, including the seal lip, to the body. If you have not already done so, this us usually the time to drill the support posts so that the clearance to the body is set.

JMHO YMMV Regards, Rick.
 

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The bottom of my posts were actually not parallel with the mounts on the chassis, in addition to being a bit too wide. This was corrected in two ways.

First - regarding the common issue of being too far apart, instead of using washers or shims, I made spacers that I mounted to the chassis.

Second - regarding the non-parallel issue, I used a press to bend / twist the legs at the point where they are below the body. This allowed me to get the mounting point completely parallel to the chassis for a stress-free installation.

With the side legs mounted to the chassis, I can completely remove the windshield frame from the sides and there is no positive or negative stress.

I'll look for some pictures, but I know that a few of us posted threads on this which you may find helpful.
 

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My second hand Cobra did not have the fiberglass cut back far enough to let the uprights stand parallel. Cut back about 1/8" of glass on each side and had a perfect fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the suggestions guys. I was able to get the frames bent/twisted. I clamped the bottom into a vice after wrapping with painters tape and a tshirt. I used a crescent wrench tightened onto the frame at a spot just below were the body would be. Used the handle to my jack over the crescent wrench for more leverage. The first time I tried this, I didn't use the extra leverage and couldn't get the frame to twist.

Got it in place, holes drilled, bolts in and tightened. On to the next item on the punch list...
 

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What you are seeing is quite typical. When thinking of it as if the windshield was to be mounted vertically the "twist" (or lack thereof) is deceiving because when it is laid back at the final angle it is a non issue. The important thing to remember is that the windshield must remain totally relaxed once installed. If the windshield frame "legs" do not fit the chassis mounts snugly you need to use shims to take up any gaps. If you just tighten the bolts to draw the legs into the chassis mounts you're pretty much guaranteeing that you'll have a cracked windshield in your future. I have a variety of 1/2" slot body & fender shims in 1/16" and 1/8" thicknesses that I use for filling the voids:



With their open end it's a heck of a lot easier to insert the bolts then slip these shims between the leg and chassis mount than it is to try to finagle a washer or two into place and get the bolt through them, the leg and the mount.

Good luck!

Jeff

Phew. I'm glad I didn't have this issue. The fasteners securing the windshield supports to the chassis are in hard to reach locations. If I had to frig around with shims, the 2 beer job would have stretched into a 6 pack. The windshield support legs were a tight fit and needed the ends cut off. Normal. I set the windshield angle as per the directions with the "Premiun top" and bolted it in place. To be honest, I never checked to see it the windshield support legs were perfectly parrellel to the mounting bracket on the chassis. No cracks so far. All's good.
 
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