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Plodding Along
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this in another thread, but wanted to make it a bit more visible. Thanks to a tip from Steno, I disassembled my windshield before installation to check the condition of the edges. He mentioned a while back that a glass guy told him that the unfinished edge of the FFR windshields may be behind the "crack-for-no-reason" issue. At his suggestion, I had a local glass company that does all sorts of commercial/residential/automotive stuff polish the edges of my windshield.

When I took apart the windshield, the edges were a reasonably sharp 90* and the corners were less rounded and more like serrations or facets. For all of $22.50, the shop polished the edges and corners, leaving the glass very smooth with a small radius and an opaque finish. Sorry for no "before" picture, but here's what it looked like afterwards.

The guy who did the work said that he found a bunch of spots on the unfinished edge that he felt could surely cause a crack to form, particularly if there was a bit of stress on the windshield from installation or a soft-top. Nothing is a guarantee here, but I think I bought a little piece of mind with this one.

 

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I'll be installing a new windshield this winter. Any idea how this process is done? Sandpaper and a sanding block? Finish sander?
 

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Plodding Along
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'll be installing a new windshield this winter. Any idea how this process is done? Sandpaper and a sanding block? Finish sander?
Bob - It's probably something that could be done at home with a very small disc or belt sander. They said that they don't use a water cooled tool for a compound curved piece of glass like this; rather it's like a mini belt sander. They work slowly and keep the surface cool with water. I'm guessing that you could probably replicate the effect, though, by hand with a good wet-sanding.
 

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I've seen this mentioned in other threads and am real tempted to try having the edges of my windshield polished (post 1 on this thread).

I'm close to installing the windshield and just want to verify with others that there are no bad surprises or precautions needed before removing the glass from the frame...

Anyone?

All there seems to be is 2 screws either sides conencting the lower frame to the upper frame...
 

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Thanks for posting this Chris. I'm definitely going to check/have mine ground. Seems like cheap insurance given all the threads on cracked windshields.
 

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I've seen this mentioned in other threads and am real tempted to try having the edges of my windshield polished (post 1 on this thread).

I'm close to installing the windshield and just want to verify with others that there are no bad surprises or precautions needed before removing the glass from the frame...

Anyone?

All there seems to be is 2 screws either sides conencting the lower frame to the upper frame...
OK I just removed the bottom frame of the windshield and it is nowhere near apparent that there would be microcracks awaiting to elongate under pressure or vibration. The perimeter of the glass is smooth, not rounded, but very even. I'm no longer sure if I want to risk removing it completely, transporting to a glass shop and trust it to their hands...

decisions, decisions...
 

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Plodding Along
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wormie - Are they still putting those two little brass angles inside the frame between the rubber and the frame itself?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Took the kit home 17 months ago and yes, for that generation, brass angles are what the side screws onto to hold top to bottom frame.
While it's apart, you may want to smooth the edges on those, just as another protection against pressure on the glass. I noticed that my rubber welting inside the frame had some impressions on it from both the edge of the angle and from the ends of the screws. I smoothed out all the sharp edges on the angles and also ground a bit of length off of those screws.
 

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Snake Farmer
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Shortening the post hole screws became a standard part of the build. Is there now a new generation FFR windshield that doesn't require this still?

I suppose that pulling the glass and having this polishing done, could well prevent failure down the road. My concern is it cracking during the process of removing it from the frame, while polishing, or when re-installing it. Would it still be covered under insurance in those circumstances?
 

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The best thing I've found for polishing the edges of glass is a diamond file and water - I buy a bunch of these every now and again and just toss them when they lose their edge.

good for all kinds of find polishing and sharpening jobs.

I expect a professional job would be faster though - it takes some time with a file to get a nice bevel.

SE DF8527DB Diamond Sharpening Block - Amazon.com
 
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