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does if anyone know if the production knuckles are heat treated to any spec, i believe they are cast and am curious to their strength. has anyone ever broke one, especially using the solid bearings? thanks for any input.
 

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I put WAAAYYY too much pressure on the first one I ever tried to press apart because I misunderstood how it was pressed together.

This was in a old school 30 ton press.

It didn't appear to be bent or hurt but I scrapped it because I was afraid of it.

I think if it was cast it would have broken. I think they are forged aluminum.

I never heard of anyone breaking one without hitting something hard.

I don't know anything about heat treating aluminum, but I definately wouldn't want to put much heat into one...

HTH,

Mike
 

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T bird aluminum knuckles

I havn't seen a post of anyone braking one either. I was wondering what was the weakest link on the unit. I am using the thicker Cobra axles and am planning on using a brace for the diff cover. Is the stub shaft the problem? How much torque can I go with before I need to worry. Without slicks I probably can't do much before tire spin but I was wondering what other members thought.
 

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They are designed to work in a car weighing at least a thousand pounds more. That's the edge used in a kit, the parts are overspec and cheap. Then we turn up the hp and still have the standard margin of safety to respect.

Doing the math intuitively, I suspect much more than 500 rwhp is likely going to be where things start stressing out. It's not necessarily the cliff, but continuous abuse above that where things yield and fail.

Cast vs forged, check the parting lines on them, if it's wide and heavily ground, it's forged. Cast tends to have precision mating molds with thin lines needing almost no deburring. MIM, who knows. They will use the most economical method to make the tens of thousands they do, but strength is important. We still have a lot of aluminum foundries, and it is exactly the way the AR15 recievers are made, much less the millions of rims on cars today. Forging is way better than CNC billet in that regard.
 
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