Factory Five Racing Forum banner

21 - 40 of 247 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
469 Posts
In addition to the size problem, the 6R80 also has unusual gearing, shared with it's GM counterpart. The first gear ratio is much lower than a 4 speed model, requiring a tall rear end ratio, in order for 1st gear not to be so low that it's worthless. You need a low first gear in a heavy truck, not a light car.

As an example, my 2014 C7 Corvette has the GM version of this transmission. It uses a 2.56 rear end ratio. This results in a very tall 6th gear for low rpm highway cruising. The first gear ratio is still plenty low, even for a car that weighs quite a bit more than a '33.

You can probably cram anything into a '33 but there may not be enough room for the seats after you do.

TCI makes a true close-ratio 6 speed automatic that can be adapted to a lot of different motors, but it is pricey. It has the same housing as 4L80E.

http://www.tciauto.com/tc/transmission-packageshtml
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Progmgr, I do intend to use the 6r80. I don't have the motor and trans yet. I will do all my body work probably first and tackle that maybe next summer? Not in any hurry but....

Some rumors are that there is room, that there won't be much room for pedals. I hear that it is very close for pan to cross member clearance. I am not against cutting and welding. FFR only said it won't work because they don't have a driveshaft. Ok so that's not a problem. The next issue is foot room left after its in. I have some ideas on that, including just putting the brake pedal where the clutch pedal is (I Already have to severely mod the pedal box to mount the ABS system master cylinder, and could easily move it over by doing same mods just mirroring the bracket I have pictured). This would allow me to move the gas pedal over some. But the initial measurements I have found online, I'm not so sure the bell housing is any larger than the 4r70. It's longer for sure. The other option is to move everything toward the driver to get farther on the smaller radius. All those, I will tackle once I have it in the car.

Gearing is the final issue. I can attest that the 1st gear ratio is very low. I have a 2015 mustang (with a 2.9L whipple at 13 psi). 1st is so low it's useless on that car. But the close ratio from there up is nice. Rarely does it go to 1st or second unless at a dead stop. I will run a fairly tall tire on 20" rim in the rear (Louisiana roads don't lend well to rubber band tires) and I will run a taller rear gear. Probably in the 3.08ish range.

I know it's a lot to just be able to say I did it, but it's what I want so it's what I set out to do lol.

I'm not to worried about making it fit and work. I'm actually more worried about making the top work removable with the roadster windshield that I have an itch to attemp after reading the hot rod Lincoln thread.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
Lots done today on my first real full day able to work on her!

Finished the firewall with 10-24 button head stainless bolts. Installed the steering column and shaft, the power steering unit but probably have to reclock it later. And started in brake lines. With the right tool, flaring stainless is easy! Got the rear line ran and ran to one side of the rear end. Have to cut the tabs off the rear end to mount the lines solid to. Fwiw, the Eastwood tubing straightener works like a charm!!



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I'm not to worried about making it fit and work. I'm actually more worried about making the top work removable with the roadster windshield that I have an itch to attemp after reading the hot rod Lincoln thread.....
If you like the Hot Rod Lincoln "look" using the hard top with the roadster windshield, then the easy way to go is to buy the hardtop from Dan Ruth (Welcome to Innovative Rodding Specialists). I've got one of Dan's hardtops in my garage and the workmanship is superb - will save many hours on bodywork. It came with the mounting hardware to keep the top easily removable. Also, Dan is a great guy who is happy to share his knowledge and experience building these kits. Keith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
I'm not to worried about making it fit and work. I'm actually more worried about making the top work removable with the roadster windshield that I have an itch to attemp after reading the hot rod Lincoln thread.....
If you like the Hot Rod Lincoln "look" using the hard top with the roadster windshield, then the easy way to go is to buy the hardtop from Dan Ruth (Welcome to Innovative Rodding Specialists). I've got one of Dan's hardtops in my garage and the workmanship is superb - will save many hours on bodywork. It came with the mounting hardware to keep the top easily removable. Also, Dan is a great guy who is happy to share his knowledge and experience building these kits. Keith
Yeah I saw that and have read mr dans threads completely. That's definitely an option. But part of this is to prove I can do it. I enjoy the challenge and the work (sick, right? Lol).

But thanks for that. It def on my radar if I ruin mine and need another option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Here's the other side of going through. I had a chance to run the first part of the front line today. This came out nice, I think. I got my abs systems power brake setup today. It's gonna be a feat to fit it all there behind the dash. I may have to either move the entire pedal box toward the firewall or turn the MC around and do a bell crank to 180* the force from the pedal. A simple stud with a bearing and a 1:1 arm would suffice but I also have to keep the MC low enough for the reservoirs to drain correctly. They are nice polished aluminum. I think illmount them on the firewall and use tubing and AN fittings to run the supply, return and pump supply lines. I'll put pics of hag I end up doing up. Gonna put the body on next and make that decision


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Lots done today on my first real full day able to work on her!

Finished the firewall with 10-24 button head stainless bolts. Installed the steering column and shaft, the power steering unit but probably have to reclock it later. And started in brake lines. With the right tool, flaring stainless is easy! Got the rear line ran and ran to one side of the rear end. Have to cut the tabs off the rear end to mount the lines solid to. Fwiw, the Eastwood tubing straightener works like a charm!!





What brand and model# tools did you use for tubing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Looking great and moving along fast.
I see you are riveting screwing etc, are you making it where it will all come apart later for powdercoating the frame?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
Looking great and moving along fast.
I see you are riveting screwing etc, are you making it where it will all come apart later for powdercoating the frame?
Don, I bolted the firewall on but most of it will only be riveted (or cleco'd or screwed) every few holes. I'll drill them all. I am not sealing anything on or mounting anything permanent (save a few rivets maybe) so I can take apart to finish it. Thanks!

Today, I finished the brake lines except for the axle end flex hoses. The ones I bought are too short and 45* ends will work better. Then I started on the master cylinder. I have the abs systems power brake kit. The two people I talked to used bell crank to change the direction to fit the MC. I put the body on and measures the room I had and opted to attempt to install backwards. I had 13" to the firewall tubing. I moved the pedal box forward, cut off the brackets for the wilwood cylinders. Then I threw the brake pedal out and moved the clutch pedal over to use. I drilled and tapped the end to fit the abs cylinder rod threads and screwed it in. Once I got the basics there, I ground out some more aluminum to move it forward a bit more and allow me to raise the brake pedal a bit more. Next, I put the body on again and checked fit. It fits! It's tight but works fine. So I ground a little more to improve fit and pedal placement a bit more. Then I made two angle brackets to bolt it to. One will be double bolted to the box and the other bolted to the box bolt and welded to the frame. I also have some gussets cut to add to the sides of each bracket to improve strength and I will add a bracket to put all 4 pedal box bolts in. I think it should work wonderfully once finished.

A couple of brake line pics just for novelty, and the last is the master cylinder mount work in progress. This is the abs 6 3/4" MC. I don't think the long one would fit. The reservoirs will be on the firewall with an lines to feed the MC, pump and overflow to tank.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
Today, after fixing my old mans truck, I finished up the master cylinder mount. It works great. Plenty pedal travel. I'm certain it'll lock the brakes long before bottoming. Welded up the gussets andast bolt mount plate. Made a mount for the proportioning valve and ran the tubing from the MC and valve to the bulkheads at the base of the firewall. Other than two flex hoses and some mounting on rear end, brakes are done.

Now I gotta figure out how I'm gonna plumb and where I'm gonna mount the reservoir and pump the brakes. I am gonna use ss line and an for the high pressure leg for sure and I think braided line and an for the supply side to the pump and the return.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)
Love your build
Thanks!

Not sure why my pics stopped showing.

Edit. It seems photos bucket has changed their terms of service and don't allow linking. That's a real kick in the huevos. Now I need to figure out how to fix all the pics. I'll work on that one day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #36
Thanks, Rychi. I swapped to imagur. Just gotta learn to use it. I'll be going back and trying to fix them all over time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #37
HVACMAN said:
What brand and model# tools did you use for tubing?
Sorry, I missed this questions.

For flaring, I used the rigid 41162 377 flaring tool. It works wonderfully on the stainless. Flares and burnishes. Course I'll know more after I actually put fluid in it lol.

For straightening the coiled tubing I used Eastwood EW30537 handheld straightener. Took some learning but it works plenty well enough.

Cutting I used a tubing cutter I had here. No
Magic to that. And bending I also used the same one I used to build my last 2 cobras and a t bucket. I remember I picked it up at the local parts store but there's no name on it. Thats been 15+ years. But the flaring tool is the big important one when doing brakes, either 37* or 45*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
Today, I finished mounting my reservoir and started on the bracket for the hydraulic pump. This is the current plan. I haven't welded it on yet to let you guys critique and make sure I'm not missing something. It's far enough off cowl to allow for wiper stuff, far enough back (deeper than the ac Evap) to allow for gauges, and still not as low as the echo so should be hidden. It is inlet low so the pump itself is well below the reservoir. My only worry is removing the accumulator (the ball thing) to prime it. Might make a mess the way it's facing.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,004 Posts
plan ahead

I like the way you step off the path and make your own trail at times on the build. Having said that I cringe when I see the reservoirs under the cowl, it's a clean look but comes with some potential problems as delivered.

There have been several threads where the cover panel couldn't be properly sealed because of the thin glass on the body and lack of space to make a strong thin cover that will properly crush a gasket and become watertight.

The carwash and rain that runs through there finds it's way under the dash and in a couple cases shorted out the fuse panel and soaked the carpet.

The simple answer that occurs to me is a small curb. It can be as simple as a door edge guard bonded to the body panel with the but end seam at the lowest point of the shape. You still need to stiffen the glass on the underside and make a cover panel in a thin, strong compound shape but a curb will do most of the work. Start thinking about that now while you still have good access to that area and post pictures of your solution along the way.

Cool set-up on the brake system, thanks for sharing the build.
Dale
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
Thanks for the input, Dale. I'm already thinking about how to seal that panel. I want to flush mount the cover, which means making my own glass backing edge to attach to. For sealing, I have access to some teflon based sticky backed gasket material that I will try, and I plan on making the cover stronger via a metal rod glasses in and shaped to help the cover keep it shape. I'm putting all my eggs in that basket, for now, and will sort out a fix if that doesn't work. Hopefully, I won't need access behind there though, as if there are no leaks, and the reservoir is high and large enough, technically, you shouldn't have to add fluid ever. Fluid level drops over time as pads where and you push it back in when you replace them.

If the gasket doesn't work, I'll seal that puppy with metal roof seam tape and just deal with the clean up of it when I do have to remove the cover lol.
 
21 - 40 of 247 Posts
Top