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Curious George
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418 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I figured while I wait another month till FFR is open, I'd move forward...

this is the brake kit
and the correct 220-12902 Flexline kit for this setup

I'm putting the 45 degree adapters on the brake calipers and these won't just screw in... they get about 1/2 way and then nothing!

even went and got an 11mm wrench to have better grip on the nut, but ended up stripping anyways.
the 45-degree adapters are cheap so I'm not worried about replacing the one I mangled, but shouldn't these just screw in?

trying not to get frustrated, but...

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Pro FFR Builder and Moderator
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14,617 Posts
That is a NPT or tapered pipe fitting. It gets tighter as it goes in. Do not play he-man with it. Snuggley tight is plenty
 

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Curious George
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418 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That is a NPT or tapered pipe fitting. It gets tighter as it goes in. Do not play he-man with it. Snuggley tight is plenty
understood, but shouldn't it go the whole way to to the hilt? i..e where it turns to 45?

i'm thinking some of the powerdercoating got into the internal threads.
 

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Pro FFR Builder and Moderator
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It's not meant to go all the way to the hilt. If it does there is a chance it will not seal.
 

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Senior Charter Member
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1,752 Posts
Short answer NO. It looks like you had it in about 6 turns or so which is plenty far for a tapered pipe thread fitting, any more and you take a chance on stripping or braking the fitting or damageing the threads in the caliper.
 

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2,473 Posts
You also must use teflon tape and/or pipe thread sealant on tapered pipe threads. I'm not a fan of the use of tapered pipe threads in calipers and am less of a fan of using a 45 or 90 degree fitting in the tapered pipe thread - reason being that when the fitting is tight enough to seal it is rarely pointing in the direction you need it to go. Better to install a straight adapter and the have the 45 degree or 90 degree elbow built in to the end of the brake hose so you can orient it an then tighten the tube nut.
 

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126 Posts
Good news is, those NPT fittings are common and should be easy to source (if you don't have extras). Once you get it together, you may be able to test for leaks with compressed air. Just put a block of wood between the pads, spray soapy water around the fitting, and apply air.
 

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5,893 Posts
As others have said, those are NPT threads. Normal recommendation for that size is finger tight then about 2 turns with a wrench. They'll get tight but no reason to manhandle them. NPT are tapered and are sealed after 4-5-6 turns in. As mentioned, recommended to use thread sealant. I don't recommend tape on brake lines. I use Permatex thread sealant. Here's a picture from my 20th Anniversary build. And you can see it's not bottomed out. Those brakes have been on the road for three season with no leaks or any issues. Fortunately, those fittings are pretty standard and widely available. Summit, whatever.

 

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Curious George
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418 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
As others have said, those are NPT threads. Normal recommendation for that size is finger tight then about 2 turns with a wrench. They'll get tight but no reason to manhandle them. NPT are tapered and are sealed after 4-5-6 turns in. As mentioned, recommended to use thread sealant. I don't recommend tape on brake lines. I use Permatex thread sealant. Here's a picture from my 20th Anniversary build. And you can see it's not bottomed out. Those brakes have been on the road for three season with no leaks or any issues. Fortunately, those fittings are pretty standard and widely available. Summit, whatever.

Thx Paul - eBay to the rescue $10 shipped


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Not a waxer
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11,767 Posts
As Mark, Paul and the others have said those are pipe thread (NPT) and require Teflon tape or paste on the threads which serves two purposes; to fill any miniscule voids between the threads and to serve as a lubricant as the threads are tightened. An NPT joint actually seals at the interference fit between the male and female threads. In automotive applications I always use PTFE paste...save the tape for when you replace your shower head ;)

Jeff
 
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