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FFCobra Craftsman
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Discussion Starter #1
To make this a short post, let me just get to the point. I have a fuse box that leaves me with no choice but to solder the +12v to the entire dash/interior (stereo, ECU, Dash, AC&Heater unit) to the fuse box that supplies this power to the various items listed.

Do you feel that soldering the +12v wire to the bus will work or is there a chance the solder will melt under the load? Solder melts at 370ºF. I should hope that fuse box never gets anywhere near that but thought I'd ask.

Thanks in advance,
Paul
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the reply but I don't think I wasn't being clear with my question. The place I want to solder the wire to is the fuse box bus bar. The bus bar supplies and distributes power to the other systems. This bus is a flat piece of golden metal, I'm guessing bronze, that I soldered about ⅜" of wire to the flat side. This is a much better connector than just crimping it, but due to space limitations I'm not able to crimp it and decided to try soldering it.

I was simply wondering if the soldering joint might melt under heavy load.
 

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If that connection gets near 400*, you've got some serious problems. And loss of that joint isn't really one of them.
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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Discussion Starter #6
If that connection gets near 400*, you've got some serious problems. And loss of that joint isn't really one of them.
I misread your post. Thank you for your thoughts.
 

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Bob is correct, that solder connection should never get close to that temperature. The insulation will melt and/or burn off before that. The solder should not melt under a normal load. Make sure the wires are gauged to meet the amperage needs.

To make sure I've got a good connection with soldering I sometimes will clean the base metal, in this case your 'Bronze' bar, with some kind of fine abrasive and then use a liquid rosin flux I brush on both the bar and the wire. Then of course, use rosin core solder making sure you heat the base metal enough to melt the solder, don't just melt the solder onto the base metal. Make sure you allow the wire to be hot enough to melt the solder too.

Again, using rosin as the flux.

George
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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Discussion Starter #8
Bob is correct, that solder connection should never get close to that temperature. The insulation will melt and/or burn off before that. The solder should not melt under a normal load. Make sure the wires are gauged to meet the amperage needs.

To make sure I've got a good connection with soldering I sometimes will clean the base metal, in this case your 'Bronze' bar, with some kind of fine abrasive and then use a liquid rosin flux I brush on both the bar and the wire. Then of course, use rosin core solder making sure you heat the base metal enough to melt the solder, don't just melt the solder onto the base metal. Make sure you allow the wire to be hot enough to melt the solder too.

Again, using rosin as the flux.

George
Good points. Thanks George
 

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I might rough up the bar a little, even drill a hole and insert some of the wire through the hole as an anchor, then clean, flux and solder. Keep in mind the bar has to get hot enough to melt the solder and not the plastic surrounding it, unless it is detached.
 
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