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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There have been some recent questions about installing seat racks and having just completed this part of the build, I thought it might be worthwhile to share my approach.
First of all, you do need to remove the tack welded studs. This is not a particularly easy task. I did this by drilling out the studs from the top side, on the button head. I put the rack in a drill press, centered the drill (about the size of the threaded stud) on the button and drilled through. I then flipped the racks over and used a Dremel with a stone to grind the remnants of the stud away. Although the studs have a round button on top, if you look close you'll see that where it penetrates the rack, it is actually square and has been welded in place. When you're grinding the stud remnants away, you need to also hit the square outline of the penetrating portion on the bottom of the rack focusing on the corners. I did this until you couldn't "feel" the square portion outine on the rack, being careful to grind to flush or just below. This will leave the immediate area on the rack with light grinding marks and the outline of the square pretty well obscured.
I then took a punch with a point and a hammer and struck inside this square from the bottom side, near the corners of the now barely visible square. A few good licks and the square will start to become free from the rack. Once I got to this point, I stuck the chisel through the hole I had drilled and popped the square out. This leaves a square hole (4 each) in the rack and a real sense of accomplishment. BTW - safety goggles are NOT sufficient for grinding. You need full goggles and/or a face shield. I learned this the hard way.
The instructions with the racks (mine from F5) say how to mark the floor panels for locating the holes to match the rack and when I did this, the outside front hole was in nothing but thin aluminum floor panel.
Unfortunately, I didn't see a lot of options for moving the locations of the mounting holes so I considered other options to reinforce the aluminum. I ended up using aluminum strip (from Home Depot) about 1/8" thick, 1" or so wide and cut 9" long. I drilled two holes the 7 3/4" apart in this bar to match those the instructions said to drill in the floor. I then installed the inside rack, putting the front bolt loosely through the one of the holes in my bar before going into the 4" tube. I set the bar such that the front bolt of the outside rack went through the other hole before going through the aluminum floorboard. This partially anchors the weaker hole (through the aluminum) to the stronger hole in the tube. I used a washer and nylok nut on the underside of the outside front bolt to lock it firmly in place. Now here was the final part of my approach. About mid span of the aluminum bar, I ran a self tapping screw through both the bar and the steel plate that is conveniently below. (I actually drilled smaller hole first then followed with the larger self tapping screw.) This approach provided direct reinforcement of the aluminum floorpan at the outside front hole and anchored it so that it couldn't rotate around the inside bolt on the other end of the bar. This opposes lateral and front to back forces to counter the sliding motion of the seat rack without putting as much stress on the floorpanel.
By the way, I also chose to drill and tap the 5/16-18 threads in the 4" tube and 2" X 2" outrigger tube. Everything seemed to tighten up very nicely and the seat moves to and fro very well. In rality, I don't expect to be doing much seat adjustment since you pretty well are shoehorned into these cars anyway!
I hope this helps others with this part of the build.
Harry
 

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Harry: Just put mine together last weekend. I also drilled and tapped - a little more work but makes a nice clean job - while the seat does need to be solid.... the reality is that the seat belt system is what will save your life. For this reason I also drilled a hole which will be used to secure a 5th point (anti-submarine belt) to harness.

I also choose to incline the seat front by 9 degrees to make it a little more confortable. Of course that meant I had to make a frame for the passenger side as well. I'll post some pictures later.
 

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I'm at this point in my build also.
Thanks, for the good info.
Paul M.
 

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I offset mine in the front about 1.5" to make the seat come forward without interference from the trans tunnel. Here's a pic:

 

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So... drilled and tapped holes.



Welded together passenger side with 9 degree incline. Note.... picture is taken on top of a piece of my damplifier pro .... which came in this week. All the important garage tools in this picture....



Not attached yet but in place to show location. Seat can be easily installed and removed since it engages with 4 bolts (also not installed yet) but will be setup like the driver side pictures.



Welded together driver side with 9 degree incline. A little more work since the tracks are on this side only and height must match passenger side. Also removed seat track handle, straightened and installed so that it is not buried in the carpet.






Not attached yet but in place to show location. Seat can be easily installed and removed since it engages with the 4 bolts sticking up.
 

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Nice work. I probably should have raised mine more in the front too.
 

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Doug,

So does your seat sit straight when bolted in? I like the idea of offsetting the tracks slightly but having the seat square in the car. This way I think, it would only shift left slightly as it moves forward. I'm not sure if yours works in this manner.

Are your seats bolted to the tracks on the same angle (slightly offset) or do they sit square in the cockpit?

Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I actually considered raising and tilting my seats but decided not to. I think it would have provided a slightly more comfortable posture but I just didn't think it would be worth the trouble. My drivers side has the seat rack, my passenger side does not.
However I did elevate the passengers side slightly. Doing so helped it to clear the emergency brake, which is right in the way, plus it made the installation very easy. I used two pieces of 1 X 4 cut into about 10" lengths and marked their location on the floor (running side to side) such that they provided optimal support for the seat. I then marked two locations in each to drill through the floor and into the 4"tube, 2" X 2" tube and steel floor plate. I countersunk the bolt holes such that the installed bolts would be flush or just below the top of the 1 X 4's. I then set the seat into position on the secured boards and drilled though into the board (not through and into the floor pan/frame). I secured the seat with hefty wood screws into the 1 X 4's, spaced at the maximum width so that the seat would feel most secure. And it does.
BTW - I also installed both seats aligned with the centerline of the car, as opposed to parallel to the tranny tunnel. I just didn't care for the seats in the angled position and the adjustable drivers side will still travel freely although the right front corner does hit the tunnel. That portion of the seat is mostly foam and vinyl, so there is no seat "structure" hitting the tunnel. The result is an adjustable seat that sits squarely in the cockpit.
 

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Canuck1,
Mount the seat facing straight ahead as if the mount was in straight. The seat doesn't need to be angled. You can't really tell that it is moving over when adjusting the seat. It just moves parallel to the trans tunnel. I did it this because I am 6'2" and my wife is 5'3" and thought it might be moved all the way up quite a bit of the time.
 

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Thanks for posting Harry, and for answering Doug,

This has been a very useful topic for me!!

Cheers



Sean
 

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Kevin

Nice work ! The incline on the seat really makes a difference in riding comfort.


Brian
 
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