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Premium Member
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4,703 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:( Not quite what I expected. I am finding it hard to remove scratches from the aluminum. I get a chrome finish, but I see small scatches.
I can't seem to figure out which step the problem is.
1. 220 grit to remove machine tool lines
2. 320 grit
3. 600 grit
4. 1000 grit.
5. 1500 (sometimes)
6. Buff to a high shine.
Still see small scratches. I'm ready to give up.
 

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Charter Member
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483 Posts
Bill,

Would you consider selling the engine? :)
 

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FFCobra Fanatic
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5,542 Posts
Hey Bill,
There is a place called Rowe Machine in Wallingford that does all the wheels for OCC. I stopped down there last year with a wheel and they said they could do them no problem. Maybe take a ride down and see what they say. They could actually polish the whole things for you as you had wanted before. Otherwise maybe they can give you a couple pointers as to how to polish them the way you want. I have tried the same thing as you and gave up. I have confidence in your ability because you have surprised me so many times now. Keep at em, you'll figure it out.

Mike
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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1,899 Posts
Bill go to a 2000 and then finer if you can find it before you polish. Sometimes after I polish I see the same scratches and go back and wetsand with the 2000 or finer again then repolish. Sounds like either your not getting them smooth enough or residue left on the rim from sanding is scratching when polishing. It takes a really long time to get it right sometimes. Days even for me on tricky parts. 220 is pretty aggessive but I know it was needed to remove the lines so it requires a lot more sanding to smooth properly. I start with a 800 emery on rough alumninum castings. Maybe the sandpaper is breaking up and embedding in the rim. That's why wetsanding with a good 3M emery is best. Just a few thoughts......G.
 

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Senior Member
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5,559 Posts
One of the problems is the gap between the various grits. You'll fing that it is easier and more effective if you go through the grits sequentially (like 320-360-400-500-600, and so on). If the gaps are too big between grits, you'll spend too much time chasing scratches from the previous grit. I also think that 220 is too agressive to start with unless the wheels are badly scratched. Take the grits all the way to 2000 or 2500, and only use the black wet or dry paper. You can dry sand the early stages, but be sure to use water with a drop of dish washing liquid from 400 up.

Don't sand without a block of some sort (even if it's stiff foam or rubber (I prefer those) for metal work. Don't even try to polish with compound until the surface is an even gray, very smooth with almost a polish from just the paper alone.

Brian
 
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