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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I can probably guess the right answers. But sometimes I'm a bad guesser; so I like to ask before proceeding.

Which of these is the pressure port, and which is the return? The top port with the red cap is larger, so that's probably the return?





When connecting the these fittings to this hose, the SS barb goes inside the plastic sleeve. And the brass ferrule goes outside the plastic sleeve. Correct?





What's the best way to cut this power steering hose?

With standard SS braided hose, I cut with an air powered cut off wheel. It will get hot, so I quickly cut 1/2 the hose, then let it cool. After it cools a bit, I do the rest of the cut from the other side. That works really well. I get a nice clean straight cut, with no damage to the rubber hose. No leaks yet.
 

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Red-top one is return. I cut my hoses with a chisel, as I didn't have good results with the cutoff wheel. The stainless kept coming apart.
 

· FFCobra Fanatic
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I concur, a chisel. Makes a good clean cut with a sharp chisel and one good hit with the hammer against an anvil or the back side of a vise. Still need to tape the hose and cut in the center of the tape. The ferrule goes outside the inner sleeve.
 

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With the high-pressure hose (teflon inside) you're really going to have to give it a good whack. I just did mine last week and used a cut-off wheel. I practiced on a piece first. The other trick I learned, when cutting: wrap it with strapping tape, but then throw a small hose clamp on before cutting it, This will further prevent the braids from going wild. Then trim with some sheet metal sheers.

Also, another tip. Don't use high pressure hose on the return side. Fitting the hose on the pump / reservoir nub is a MAJOR PITA with the high pressure hose, due to it doesn't flex / stretch enough to slip on. After much struggling, I barely got mine on (heated it with a hot air gun on high and the hose was smoking it was so hot). But, I'm not happy with the fit and plan to change it out this week with more flexible braided SS hose.

Front port= high pressure
Rear port= Return
http://www.heidts.com/_uploaded_files/in-082.pdf
 

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I found the tape I used also makes a difference. I love duct tape, for for this application, I found black electrical tape to be far better. I think the electrical tape is more pliable and you're better able to wrap it much tighter.

I've been using a cutoff wheel with no problems...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Perfect! That's exactly what I needed. I'm a guy, so pictures work well.

I had properly guessed the basics, thanx for the confirmation. I'll put the hoses together tonight.

I'm using high pressure -6 hose for feed and return. But all my fittings and ends are AN, to match the KRC racing pump and remote reservoir. Easy as pie, piece of cake.
 

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yes on both questions

I wrap the line with electrical tape and cut it on the bandsaw. Take the tape off and put oil around the braided end and inside the fitting. Then assemble
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Got the job done tonight using the same tools I'v used before. BUT.... there were a couple of tricks I learned along the way.

- The steel braid is wrapped pretty tight. If you only use a couple of layers of electrical tape, it will immediately mushroom out at the end. Wrap a big hunk of tape before cutting. Strapping tape works better than electrical tape because it's not flexible.

- Once you pop off the tape, you'll have a heck of a time getting the socket over the end of the hose. Put the socket on the hose first. Then tape. Then cut.

- The fittings are not swivels. If you're using anything but a straight hose end, check the orientation of the hose end before tightening it down. You cannot twist the hose during installation.
 

· Blue Oval Scribe
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For the hydroboost in our Mustang project I wrote the following, figured I'd share it here for future hose assemblers:


Hose assembly isn't difficult, but care must be taken at each step. Begin by applying tape to the area where you will be making your cut. You can use a hacksaw, hose shears, or a high-speed cutoff wheel if you have one. We prefer the cutoff wheel.


Each fitting is comprised of three components: the socket, the sleeve, and the nipple, shown from left to right. These fittings are reusable and clockable for routing, but it's recommended new sleeves be used if the hose is disassembled for any reason.


After the hose is cut to its new length, the socket is slid over the braided outer jacket as shown. Think of this step as the same as flaring a brake line and ensuring the tube nut is installed before the line is flared (I know, we've all done it).


Insert the sleeve so that the PTFE liner is seated inside the sleeve to the lip of the sleeve and the braided covering is over the sleeve body. You can usually start the sleeve by hand, but pressing the assembly against the workbench or a block of wood will fully seat the sleeve.


Use a tapered punch to push the PTFE liner into the barbs of the sleeve, seating the liner into the sleeve.


With the hose nipple retained in a vice, apply a small amount of lubricant to the nipple and push the PTFE hose onto the nipple until it seats/bottoms. Slide the socket back up the hose to the nipple and then tighten it with the appropriate wrench to seal the hose end. You want 1/32-inch or less gap between the nipple and socket (use your thumbnail as a guide). Use compressed air or solvent to flush the line of any cutting/assembly debris.

HTH...
Mark
 
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