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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.ffcars.com/forums/17-factory-five-roadsters/298604-power-steering-i.html

http://www.ffcars.com/forums/17-factory-five-roadsters/299999-power-steering-questions.html

http://www.ffcars.com/forums/17-factory-five-roadsters/300627-power-steering-ii.html

OK, so I'v got some road time, made some adjustments, and got some more road time.

Initially I left the street alignment settings where they always have been: 3* caster and 0.25* camber. I wanted to drive it with these settings so I can have something to compare it to. I drove it for a couple of hours in a variety of situations.

Steering feel is extremely light. The car is extremely responsive without being "darty". I installed the #6 flow valve before installing the pump. There's one more valve that will increase steering effort, and a number of valves that will decrease it.

Over the last week or two, I worked on the front end. My goal was 0.2* camber, 7-8* of caster, and 1/32" toe in.

As has been previously noted, if you want that much caster you run in to a problem with the adjustable upper A-arm. You generally have to install a longer adjustment tube. Fortunately, I have adjustable lower A-arms, with rod ends instead of bushings. I started by moving the lower ball joint forward about 1/8" or so. I also took the time to make sure both lower ball joints were in the same location in the chassis.



After that, it was the tedious process of getting things aligned the way ypu want them.



I hit my goals pretty closely. Starting from zero, a front end alignment is a real time consuming effort. I left it at 0.2* camber, 6.5* caster, and 1/32" toe in. A little more effort an I could easily obtain 8-9* of caster. But I was tired of messing with it, and wanted to see how it felt.

It is definatly an improvement. A lot of the lightness is gone, it tracks better. Turn in is very quick, but more manegable than before. The further you go off center, the more resistance you feel. Coming back to center is also easily controllable. I don't think I'll add any more caster.

I don't get to the track for a few months yet, so we'll see how it goes.
 

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Pro FFR Builder and Moderator
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Did you put a cooler in the system? If you didn't you really need to.
 

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bob, do run more negative chamber on the track? I'm around -2.75 degrees with uniform tire temps. I have 6 degrees neg. caster too, it feels good.

Gordon, I don't have a cooler with the KRC race pump and the most restriction valve. I have never had one. I know a lot of guys have had overheating trouble - but I thought it was related to autoX
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't have a cooler. I have a plan for one if it's needed, though. I figured I would keep an eye on the temps during the summer and at the track to see how things go. If they're much above 220* or so, I'll add a cooler.

In the past, I'v run as much as 2.5* camber at the track. Now I'm back to using Kumho V710's. Kumho recommends minimal camber. I get a fairly broad temp spread and fast lap times at 0.7*. Next time out, I think I'm going to try 0.5* and see what happens.
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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25,959 Posts
You may be OK w/o a cooler on a track. Much less steering being done and the speed keeps the air flowing a lot better than 60 seconds runs followed by waiting periods. On my car,prior to the cooler, I would notice the steering get somewhat stiifer toward the end of an AX run. Not stiffer like when there is a line restriction, just heavier steering that still worked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Track Update

I've been driving it on the street for a few months now. Highway, back roads, and city streets. I'v set the pressure and assist to be somewhat low, with room to move up or down as I need to. Still provides a "heavy" feel for a light car with P/S. The effort is not much different than my Dodge pick up.

I'm not a big fan of P/S. If I was building another street only car, I would not use P/S. I like the feeling of the manual rack a little bit better. To each his own, I suppose.

Just finished the first track week end of the year, at Pikes Peak International Raceway. It's a short track, 1.3 miles and 10 turns. Most turns are fairly tight and low speed, 45-60mph. 2 turns are a wide banked oval, about 100mph.

I did not change the alignment at all from the street settings: -0.3* camber, 5.6* caster, and 1/16" toe in.

I have to admit, the P/S is very nice. I'm not nearly as tired and beat up as I used to be on Sunday night. And that was really my major goal - so, mission accomplished! My shoulders are a little sore, but that might also be from the belts, and not so much the steering effort. And I don't have a migrain headache.

I was also faster than last year by about 2 seconds. Not sure why that is. Part of it is the steering, I'm sure. There is definatly a faster and sharper turn in. And since it I'm not using so much energy to turn the wheel I'm not as tired, and I can turn the wheel faster. I really like it. Well worth the money and effort.

Temps were in the high sixties to low seventies. Water temps stayed at 160-170*, oil temps climbed to 210*, but P/S fluid temps never got high. I didn't bring a thermometer, but I could stick my finger in the fluid and it was only warm, not hot. We'll see what happens on a hot day at this same short track.
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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25,959 Posts
I think another maybe less obvious benefit of reduced effort is greater ease of making those little corrections constantly needed. I don't mean correcting for a huge tail out slide, just the one to two inches at the wheel rim type movement needed to keep the car right on the edge.
 
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