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FFCobra Master Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I painted my F-panels and upper trunk floor with some black POR, thinking that I would eventually do all of the aluminum with the stuff. The thought was that the paint was so shiny and durable, that it would be right up there with powder coating. Unfortunately, the only thing impressive about it was the time it took to remove it. The paint is practically impossible to apply flawlessly (maybe spraying would work but the paint is so hard to remove from anything, I figured it would ruin my spray gun)and it sucks in any bit of dust within 100 yards. I'm going with Rustoleum Hammered-Finish spray. The only time you see most of the aluminum is during the build and the hammered finish looks good and is easy. POR is great for frames and suspension parts and that's about it IMHO.
 

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Charter Member
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1,328 Posts
Brake fluid spills on my frame took it off CLEAN to bare metal (like some kind of bad furniture stripping infomercial) The areas that were stripped on my frame soaked overnight, so I don't know exactly how long it takes, but it definitely removed POR15.
 

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Premium Member
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POR stands for Paint Over Rust. It's not meant to be used on a clean flat panel.
 

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Husband/Father/Son
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POR15 can be used on the aluminum panels, but like the Rustoleum tech line stated, it must first be roughed up so it has something to bite into the material. Then again, you must wipe it down with a wax/residue remover first as well, just like you would prep any other area of your car to paint.


Bill S.
 

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FFCobra Master Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gentlemen:

I did sand the aluminum and even used POR's Metal Ready to etch. The adhesion was not the problem - it adhered like crazy. The problem is that you can't get a nice finish with POR - at least I couldn't. I sanded and etched the metal, wiped it with a tack cloth, moved to a dust free area of the house, even wiped my brushes with tack cloths (all new brushes) along with all surrounding areas. I tried a regular china bristle brush and foam brushes and foam rollers but in every case there were flaws when dried. Most of the flaws were small paint bubbles that I couldn't get out but some were pieces of dust that were drawn to the POR while drying. The paint is so highly reflective that any flaw stands out like a sore thumb. I love the durability, adhesion, and flexibility of the product but I just couldn't get to a result that I was happy with on these smooth flat surfaces.

It looks like spraying in a paint booth is the only way to get the finish that I'd want and if I could do that, the results would be incredible - pure mirrored black.

Moving to Plan B: Rustoleum Hammered-Finish. I've spent too much time on something that won't show, for the most part.
 

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Senior Charter Member
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DMW,

I also just tried POR on a test piece of aluminum. I only had one problem with the finish and that was dust. I did not paint in any type of dust free environment at all. I used a sponge brush.

Please let us know how the Rustoleum works, all my test with Rustoleum was it chipped to easily.

Thanks
Steve
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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711 Posts
DMW,

I used the gray Hammered Paint from Rustoleum. Bought at Lowe's. You can see pictures of the paint on "4.6 install pictures" posted yesterday.

I hope this will give you a good idea of what it will look like. Not especially durable, but it does look good.

Raymond
 

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FFCobra Master Craftsman
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8,694 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Steve,

I tried the Rustoleum on a couple of small pieces so far. I used Rustoleum metal primer after first sanding the aluminum. It seems OK so far but it has only been on the test pieces a couple of days. I personally like the Hammered-Metal look so that was my choice.

WARNING - if you use the Hammered-Metal paint, they say that you can apply it directly over their primer without waiting for the primer to dry. This didn't work too well in testing because the Hammered-Metal had different finished textures on dryer parts of the piece than on wetter parts. When the primer is completely dry, the Hammered-Metal looks good. I'll wait a couple of days and see how chip resistant it is but I'd be surprised if it doesn't work.

I might still use POR on the underside pieces - bottoms of floor pans, bottoms of trunk panels. POR will definitely be the best way to prevent dings and nicks from road dirt and stones.
 

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FFCobra Master Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Started from scratch again. Took the F-panels down to bare metal (a project), sanded again, primed again, and used Rustoleum Hammercoat. I'm very happy with this approach - and I'm tired of painting.
 
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