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Hook' Em !
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56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading some posts about people having trouble with bending and fitting brake lines, however I haven't read anything about people using all steel braided line (Aeroquip type line and fittings). Why is that ? Not practical ? Not cost effective ? It seems to me it would be much easier.

Please enlighten me


Thanks,

Armin
 

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Super Moderator
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not practical
not cost effective
 

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Administrator
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Armin,

Kouros did his that way and is quite happy with his results, although he did mention it being pricey. Maybe he'll chime in here or you can PM him. I'll send him a note about this thread.

 

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Charter Member
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Armin,as stated above.

Actually the process of bending and fitting brake lines is NOT that big a deal.

You need to have a plan on where to route the lines ,and if you don't want to do any flaring then purchase pre-flared lines of appropriate lenghts and tie it all together.
Paul M.
 

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Junior Charter Member
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1,524 Posts
I was surprised at how few problems I had with the brake lines. I bought pre-flared lines in a number of different sizes and actually enjoyed the process.

Todd
 

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Administrator
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Oops. Brake lines? I'm sorry, I thought you were describing the FUEL lines. I don't know anyone who did their brake lines that way.

:(
 

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Junior Charter Member
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I started out with some trepidation, but once I got started it was actually quite fun. Don't bother with the pre-bent. I did - waste of money. I ended up bending my own and not using the pre-bent.

Make sure you have a decent bender and some medium to large sockets that you can use to bend the tube.

I used a length of TV cable to determine the length of the runs. Then a wire coat hanger to mock up the route.
 

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Sr FFR builder
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5,565 Posts
I could be wrong, but I was under the impression that an entire system with braided lines would give you spoungy brakes (at least I was told that once).

Bending brake lines was one of the easier tasks in the build IMHO. (And I never did it before prior to this job.)





 

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El Conquestador
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1,089 Posts
I bought pre-flared lenghts, and simply put them together, very easy! And I only have about $50 in the lines for fittings, and lines!
 

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Hook' Em !
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56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I love this forum !

8 answers, with pics, in less than an hour. Thanks !

Can anyone say for sure if what Sinatra mentions about spongy brakes with braided lines is true ?
 

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Senior Member
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5,042 Posts
Do not do your brake lines with braided line. It does NOT have the correct properties and will expand under pressure rather than put full pressure on your calipers. Not only would you spend a large amount of $$$ but you will have no brakes afterwards.
 

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Charter Member
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I've only heard of that with the stock OEM type flexible rubber hose ,not the braided type.

It would be a small fortune to make the whole car with braided hose for brake lines.

Just go ahead and dive in ,you'll be surprised how easy and rewarding the whole thing is to make it with steel lines.
Paul M.
 

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iBuild
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5,824 Posts
Armin,

Brake lines were one of the things I was fearing, it really wasn't all that bad. I used pre flared lines, and then cut some down so that I didn't have service loops. It took a little practice to get the flares right, but over-all it wasn't nearly as hard as I expected.

-Scott
 

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All the above, and not legal in PA.
Tim
 

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FFR Craftsman
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Brake lines experience a high amount pressure and particularly with boosters. While braided lines can handle such pressures, the issue comes down to "compliance". You want to reduce the amount of compliance in the brake lines to ensure the most pressure is directed towards the clamping force of the pads This is the reason you see very little flex hoses on production cars. It's a necessary evil in terms of brakes on a vehicle.

SS hoses will expand ever so slightly but the point is, they DO expand. Over the length of the lines from the MC to each caliper, I can imagine the whole system feeling like elastic. Not the kind of feeling I want for spirited driving... and that's on a cold day. On a day where the pavement is emitting over 110 deg. F., I can only see it getting worst. Steel on the other hand, would only expand very slightly and ONLY because of heat, not brake pressure. My wooden nickel's worth.
 

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FFCobra Fanatic
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I dreaded doing the brake lines due to all the horror stories I read here. Ended up being one of the easiest projects so far. Using a good flaring tool makes a difference. just take your time.
 

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Senior Member
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Ditto. Even steel braided has a lot more compliance than steel line does. And it's certainly a lot more expensive, heavier (I would guess), and much more difficult to repair down the line.

Running hard brake lines wasn't too hard, but I chickened out and left my HarborFreight flare tool in it's case - pre-flared lengths of line cost under $40 for the whole car, and I didn't have a single leak once everything was tightened down.

timm
 
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