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Junior Charter Member
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3,485 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Regulars here may remember my search for an AC compressor bracket that mounts low on the passenger side. I wanted to get the compressor on the same side as the rest of the system, and get it low and out of the way visually, and also get the weight lower in the chassis. I finally ended up making my own brackets since I couldn't find anything that was exactly what I was looking for.

The plates are 1/4" aluminum plate that I had laying around, and the spacers are made from 3/4" bar stock that I drilled on a lathe, and then used the lathe to square up the ends and get the lengths right - well I gave up when I got them within .003 of right anyways. Is is tied into three points on the cylinder head, and the lower bolt goes into the block, so when it is all snugged up, the whole thing is very solid, and doesn't weigh much at all. The adjuster rod was made out of 3/4" hex stock, and is reverse theaded on one end so I can adjust it like a turnbuckle. The result:



I also wanted an aternator bracket for the drivers side - also low mount. I can't find a single low-mount alternator bracket for a SBF on the market, but plenty of them for Chevys. Anyway, same deal, ended up just making the thing myself. Same materials. Tied into two spots on the head, two on the water pump (three in a way, since one spot ties into the backside of the timing cover). I was going to tie into a third point on the head, but a machining error on one of the spacers botched that. I could still do it, but this thing is rock solid without it. I think it looks better without it too, so that is gone. The alternator is a Ford 6G unit - similar to the one in the 03-04 Cobra and other late ford applications. It is supposed to run cooler than the 3G and early alternators, and it is lighter too.

Shots of the alternator side:




All of those cheapo bolts are there for mock-up purposes only, and will get replaced with Grade-8 before it runs in anger. The crank pulley is a March piece that will allow me to jsut use a short belt to each side, and have 180 degrees of belt wrap on everything. The water pump is a Meziere 55gph electric unit, and is variable-speed controlled in conjunction with the fan by an electronic controller according to the water temp.

You can see larger shots in my flickr album linked below by clicking on "all sizes" above the individual images.

Exit question - should I have all of those aluminum parts annodized, or leave them as is? I'm split on it.
 

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The Never-Ending Builder
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5,329 Posts
John,

Really nice work, I vote for annodized.

Hank
:darkbluecoupe:
 

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Charter Member
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889 Posts
John, you are putting "the bar" too high.... Anodized "natural." Very, very nice work.

Ken
 

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Junior Charter Member
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621 Posts
Sweet fab work, very nice detail.

Anodized for sure, got to keep it lookin purty.

Chris
 

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master craftsman
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5,597 Posts
Very very nice:smoke:
 

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Registered
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1,572 Posts
John, those came out really nice. I would like to do the same thing with my AC and alternator. Any chance you could trace out the brackets and share with us?
 

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Charter Member
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2,565 Posts
My goodness, those brackets are gorgeous works of art. Well done!

Garry
 

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Junior Charter Member
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3,485 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Russ: Tapered ends were already on my mind - great minds think alike :D

Chris: I knew someone would ask, and I've already been thinking about it... Here's the deal - because the AC side ties into the block and heads, different heads and maybe a different deck height on the block is going to change the measurements on the holes. My stuff may not fit others. On the Alt side, different water pumps may be an issue, and different alternators may be a problem too. If you want, I can give some general measurements, and even describe the process if you want to measure your own setup. It ain't easy, but everything was measured with a 8" dial caliper, the plates were hand cut with a jigsaw and cleaned up with a vertical belt sander, and drilled on a cheapo chinese drill press that I've had for 25 years. The spacers were harder actually - I think the thick wall thickness and perfectly square ends are important to the stiffness of the whole thing, and I paid a lot of attention to getting the lengths pretty close to dead-on. I borrowed a friends lathe to do those, and it took me about 2.5 hours to do 14 of them. That was after I had already rough cut them at home and had them within about .030 of where they needed to be using a sawzall and the same belt sander. If you want to know the process in detail, PM me - and if a bunch of you do, then speak up and I could do a separate post/article on how to do it.

Thanks for the comments!
 

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Premium Member
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176 Posts
Obtaining proper brackets, like yours, are a source of frustration for many of us I think, or certainly for me. Please so a new post/thread detailing your ideas and thought process as the whole community would benefit. These brackets are truly a work of art.
 
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