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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
EdwardB's Mk4 #7750 Build Thread

In early September of 2012, I purchased Mk4 #7750 from GT-Tom in NH. He picked it up at FFR in March 2012, and installed suspension parts but not too much more.

My build plan includes decisions that were already made by Tom -- 17 inch FFR wheels, Wilwood brakes and pedal box, FFR spindles, Levy 5-link rear suspension, hydroboost, Ron Francis wiring, black powder coat chassis.

While I'm still finalizing, balance of build plan includes 347 stroker (probably), TKO600 (again, probably), Mustang tank, mechanical fuel pump, AFCO radiator and Breeze shroud, Freddie's power steering also powering the hydroboost brakes, no heat or AC just heated seats, competition dash layout, Alex's glove box and dash vinyl, Breeze front battery mount (if I can get it to play nice with the electric PS pump), GAS-N side pipes, Breeze roll bar, chrome QJ's, hydraulic actuated clutch, mechanical throttle linkage, Russ Thompson turn signal, and expanded PS footbox. That's enough detail for now. The car will be similar to my Mk3, e.g. only driven for street and general cruising.

Color is still not decided, and at the speed I build, won't have to decide for awhile. But I did decide to do a black "theme" for the rest of the chassis, including all the aluminum. Had about 25 pieces powder coated gloss black in the first group, and most are installed. Will do the rest after they're fitted.

First business was to build a body buck to fit over the chassis. The new profile on the forum for the Mk4 fit the back perfectly. You can see #5125 Mk3 still in the garage. I had planned to put it in storage for the winter by now, but we keep having these nice weather days, even in November. Supposed to be in the 60's tomorrow. I just don't have the heart to put it away.



Looks like this as of this morning:



Front suspension. In preparation for power steering and increased caster, I replaced the UCA front linkage tubes with AFCO 5 inch tubes from Summit. In the process, found the supplied rear tubes were either cross-threaded or galled, so I replaced those with AFCO 4 inch tubes after chasing the threads. Had to buy 5/8"-18 RH and LH dies.



Breeze 3-turn Unisteer PS rack, with FFR rack extenders, Breeze extended boots, Moog tie rod ends, and Breeze offset bushings:

 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
This is a close-up of the fairly new FFR spindles. Hope they're as good as promised. So far I'm impressed. At full suspension droop, the wheels toe in just slightly. The SN-95's in my Mk3 in this position are turned in a bunch.



Already installed 7/16 couplers for the rear Q-J's. Hopefully will keep from having to drop the tank after installed:



Wilwood pedal box set up with master cylinder for clutch actuation. Also can see the hydroboost setup (Forte's). Leaving the top and side pieces of the footbox off for now:



Finished installing the Russ Thompson turn signal and steering column this morning. (Yes I know I have to take the wheel and turn signal off to install the dash):



Pedal set-up so far. Forte's AC style pedals for Wilwood. Nice pieces. Will install dead pedal when final positions are determined:



Expanded PS footbox. Used the patterns found on this forum and my cheap little HF brake. Worked out pretty well. Literally twice as wide at the back as the standard PS footbox in my Mk3. My wife is happy. I'm committed to a small block now.

 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Cockpit so far. .090 firewall from FFMetals. Also used their PS F-panel piece (no radiator hose hole) and front DS footbox piece (no holes). Just starting to fit floor and back wall pieces:



Rear suspension and rear Wilwood brakes. Pretty normal.



Levy 5-link as installed by Tom. It's a beautiful thing.



Thought I would throw this in. Bought this Campbell Hausfeld air riveter at our local tool store. It works fantastic. BTW, using black and natural color Ultimate rivets from Summit. I really like how they work.

 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Might as well turn this thread into a build log, even though I may not update too frequently since I’m a pretty slow builder. Since the last update, sorted out the fuel tank, radiator mounting, and e-brake. Also cut and installed the radiator fan shroud. Also spent a lot of time researching and ordering my engine.

But the last few weeks I’ve been focused on fuel and brake lines. Kind of the usual scope creep, at least for me… I wanted to use stainless lines. After reading all the horror stories and trying my cheap little flaring tool, ordered and received the Eastwood vise mounted flaring tool. Great decision, more later. Also upgraded my tube bending tools with a couple new items. Then once I started working on installation, decided I didn’t really want to use the little padded clamps, so got several different clip types as seen in the pictures. All the clips are installed with 10-32 screws, either with tapped threads in the main chassis tubes or rivnuts.

This was my first time doing an all-up installation. On my Mk3, most of the lines were already run by the original builder. I just had to make a few for the PB install. So I was definitely learning as I went here, and practiced a lot on the supplied steel tubing from FFR. Most of the pieces I got just the way I wanted, and then duplicated in the stainless. This was slow, but worked OK.

Couple of design objectives. Determined early on I wanted to use 3/8 fuel line. The build is a mechanical fuel pump and carb, so no return line required. Also wanted to keep the area just in front of the MC (rear part of the DS F panel) as open as possible because my PS reservoir and hoses will fill that area. I’m very fortunate to live about 15 miles from Inline Tube, so bought the lines, tube nuts, tees and some of the clips from them. By picking up in person, I was able to fit the tubing in our SUV with minimal bending.

What worked:
- The flare tool from Eastwood is amazing. Absolutely perfect flares every single time. Totally takes the stress from that aspect. I had one bad flare through the entire time, and it was my fault. I didn’t have the tube in the die flush to the front, so the folded over double flare portion was only about half the normal width. Cut it off and made another.
- The stainless tubing from Inline is a little harder to work with than the plain steel (as supplied by FFR) but not too bad. Most bends were with tubing benders. I did make a couple of the larger bends around 2 and 3 inch sanding drums in my bench vise, and that worked OK too.

What didn’t work:
- I had originally planned for the 3/8 fuel line and the front to rear brake line would be one piece. What was I thinking??? Even if I could bend perfectly, couldn’t have fit into the chassis with bends on both ends. I ended up with a union for the fuel line by the rear DS wheel, and a union for the brake line by the front DS wheel.
- The pinch type brake line forming tool was basically not useable. At least for me. I don’t know if it was the stainless lines or just my technique, but it just didn’t work well. I barely used it.
- I muscled through the 3/8 tubing bends, but it was about all my office hardened muscles could manage. Next time I will try to find a bender with longer handles.

Following posts with pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
DS front showing hook-ups to MC and front tee:


Closer picture of the MC. CNC reservoirs are only in their approximate position. Just need to make sure I kept some clearance.


Front cross-over. This location worked really well.


Fuel hook-up at engine compartment. Also can see the rear brake line.


Union for front to rear brake line.


Fuel and brake line going to back. Used double clips from Inline. Perfect.




 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
DS rear corner, including union for fuel line:


Fuel line end at tank location:


Routing and mounting location for e-brake cables.


PS rear:


PS front:
 

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Ed, thanks now I have to add stainless lines to my list. They look very nice, your doing an awesome job keep it up. The more time I spend on this forum the higher my budget gets. :001_tongue:
 

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edwardb:
For someone who says he's slow I think your making great progress! Your build looks clean and I like the amount of atention to detail you'r putting into it. I think you have done a good job with the brake and fuel lines. Looks great. I'm sure Tom would be happy to see his car has gone to a good home. Keep up the good work and keep us posted.

Ed.
 

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looking really good!!
 

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edwardb,

I believe you are the one that gave me advice on how to do a 45 degree Double Flare with Stainless using the Eastwood tool. I was having trouble with the tube slipping and ending up as a single flare.

If so, I thank you.

Your technique worked.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
edwardb, I believe you are the one that gave me advice on how to do a 45 degree Double Flare with Stainless using the Eastwood tool. I was having trouble with the tube slipping and ending up as a single flare. If so, I thank you. Your technique worked.
I did explain how the process worked for me. The flare in your picture looks perfect. Glad I was able to help. Good luck with your build.
 

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Edwardb,

Brake line question: I am currently mocking up my brake lines. My MC set up is similar to yours (used Whitby's power brake kit, so booster and MC is in front of driver's foot box).

Does the way your brake lines come out of the MC and down to square tube cause any problem with clutch cable routing? Or did you go with a hydraulic clutch?

SWZ
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Edwardb,

Brake line question: I am currently mocking up my brake lines. My MC set up is similar to yours (used Whitby's power brake kit, so booster and MC is in front of driver's foot box).

Does the way your brake lines come out of the MC and down to square tube cause any problem with clutch cable routing? Or did you go with a hydraulic clutch?

SWZ
To be honest, I don't know. Haven't looked at it. I am using a hydraulic clutch setup (from Forte's) so never considered any routing for a clutch cable. Having said that, what I did was pretty normal. Only slight difference from what a lot of guys do is I didn't run the rear circuit down the front of the DS foot box. Instead I went forward and then down by the front suspension. I'm not sure that matters for a clutch cable though. Sorry I'm not much help.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Build progress update 04/04/2013

It's been some weeks since I've posted any progress pics. Having to work for a living, multiple business trips, etc. sure get in the way of my build. Last night I finished up the last of the aluminum panel fitting, drilling, etc. Early in this thread I posted pictures of the completed foot boxes, firewall, F-panels, etc. Now I've been finishing up the cockpit floor, back wall and trunk pieces.

I did two mods in the trunk area. First, made some filler panels for the inside of the upper trunk area. I guess some of the earlier Mk4's had something like this, but none since. I wanted the cleaner look of the filler, plus will be easier to carpet. Second, I tried to use some of the wasted space above the fuel tank. I looked at mods some guys have done (some great ones out there) plus the Dark Water Custom option, but decided to keep it real simple and also didn't want to change any of the existing FFR framework. (I don't weld...). So made this triangular bin that drops into the DS of the trunk. Not planning a lid or anything else. Will be handy to put tools and other small stuff. If you haven't compared the trunks side-by-side between a Mk3 and Mk4, you don't realize how much smaller the Mk4 trunk is. The lower more authentic body shape is nice, but the space has to come from somewhere.

Note that I permanently attached the fuel tank access panels. Simple build here with mechanical pump at the engine. I plan to insulate and carpet the trunk, and really didn't want to mess with keeping these accessible. For the very infrequent time I would need to service something on the top of the tank, I will just drop from the bottom. Not everyone will agree with that choice, but that's what I decided to do.

Tonight everything comes out and sent for powder coating. This weekend I'm planning to tear down the 3.73 diff and replace with 3.27. Another first time adventure.

Here some pictures of the trunk area all mocked up.











Here are the rest of the parts all ready to take to powder coating. I'm doing the fuel tank as well.

 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Differential Gear Change Completed

When I bought the Mk4, it already had a 3.73 solid axle installed. After a lot of studying and forum searching, determined that 3.27 would be much better for my engine/trans combination. Even though I've never done this before, decided to try to do the gear swap myself, and leave the axle in the chassis. With the help of forum member PhoneGuy (Thanks Bob!!!) last Saturday we took everything apart. Confirmed once inside that everything was new, as expected. This meant I didn't have to take the carrier and clutch packs apart. Also confirmed it had Ford parts, so (hopefully) this meant I could re-use the existing shims with the new Ford Racing 3.27 gears. We installed the new ring gear. I didn't have any way to remove the inner pinion bearing, so took to a local shop and for $10 they removed the shim and bearing from the old pinion and pressed on the new one. Put everything back together with a new pinion seal, crush sleeve, and pinion nut. Pinion preload, backlash, and gear mesh pattern all looked good and were within spec. It's all buttoned up and back together. Waiting a couple of days to let the Permatex RTV set up, and will re-fill with Red Line synthetic lube. Interesting and somewhat challenging project. Glad it's done.

Pictures of the adventure:

Old gears:


Empty housing:


Carrier, ring gear and pinions:


Rear cover cleaned up and ready to go back on:


Checking pinion bearing preload:


Checking gear backlash:


Back together with 3.27 gears:


Sealed up, and 5-link back in place:
 

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Nice work on the rear. I've considered a gear swap to 3.55 on mine while in the car but most people said it has to come out. YOU did it on the ground no less. How many hours did it take? How did you loosen the pinion nut? What was the worst part?

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Nice work on the rear. I've considered a gear swap to 3.55 on mine while in the car but most people said it has to come out. YOU did it on the ground no less. How many hours did it take? How did you loosen the pinion nut? What was the worst part? Greg
Thanks Greg. I appreciate the compliment. Especially from you. Total time spent was probably 20 - 25 hours. I had done quite a bit of studying beforehand, including some videos I found. All helped to mostly eliminate surprises once we dived in. But also keep in mind that this was my first time with anything like this. It would be quicker the next time.

Yea, I left the axle in the car. The axle is just plain heavy, plus leaving it in the chassis gave me a built-in holding mechanism. It was definitely easier without the fuel tank or any of the trunk/cockpit aluminum in place. Only bumped my head a few times, and never too hard...

The pinion nut is one of the challenges, for sure. Both to remove and to torque back on. There is a Ford drive pinion holding tool (Google 205-126) but is around $150. I made a real simple version of the same tool using a piece of 1/4 x 2 bar stock from Lowes. Drilled two holes and bolted to the companion flange. With the axle in the position it was, the bar pushed against the floor and held the companion flange firm. Just switched sides depending on direction. (hopefully that makes sense) Was pretty easy to get the pinion nut off. Did have to push pretty hard with a long extension to install the crush sleeve, but it honestly wasn't as hard as I thought it would be. Once in range, the preload went from loose to 20+ inch pounds with maybe only 1/8 to 1/4 turn.

Probably the hardest part, believe it or not, was getting the rear cover off. The aluminum cover (part of the Levy 5-link setup) is rigid, so there was some serious persuasion finally with a long crowbar to get the silcone sealant to let go. Had us re-thinking the wisdom of staying with 3.73 gears there for a little while. :eek:hmy:

But other than that, just be prepared that the components are heavy, and with the diff in the car, you have to lift and hold everything in place both during removal and install. Would be easier on the bench with the nose down.

Hope that helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
It's been a couple of weeks. Time for another update. Not huge progress since the last time, but plodding along. I have all the remaining pieces back from powder coat. Started finalizing the trunk area first. Then will do the remainder of the cockpit. It's nearly impossible to put the rivets in some of the trunk floor with the back cockpit wall in. The black powder coat is very cool in person. But sure doesn't take very good pictures. At least with my camera.

First though, I mounted the fan on the Breeze shroud, then to the FFR Afco radiator, and then mounted the assembly in the chassis. Wrapped some neoprene around the upper mounts before mounting to give it a little bit of vibration resistance.


Used the Breeze lower radiator mount. Slick setup.


I mounted a small cooler on the side of the shroud. Will use this for the PS/PB circuit. Maybe not needed for how I'll use the car, but it was a simple add.


Put some of the trunk pieces in permanently, but then decided to install the rear wiring harness and check the gas tank fit before the last floor piece is installed. I dieted out the fuel pump hookup (mechanical pump at the engine) and shortened the tank sending harness so there's not so much wire flopping around back there. Also added a wire in the loom for a trunk courtesy light.



You can see my shiny new Nitto tires in a couple of these pictures. Now ready to finalize the trunk aluminum, and then the cockpit aluminum. Next steps will be insulation and wiring. My short block is supposed to be done this month. So if that is delivered, will be easy to get distracted to some engine building.

Still having fun!
 

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Nice work, it looks great.
 
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