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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After installing Konis on the front, I was taking the wheel back off to adjust the toe and I had a lug nut come about half the way off and it froze up. when I applied a little more force the lug started turning in the hub so the splines must have spun or torn loose. The lug is mounted in the disc hub. I can't pull the wheel and hub off as one because the spindle dust cap is behind the wheel center cap which goes in from behind. Any ideas on how to get the lug nut off?
Thanks
Tom
 

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I had this happen on my irs rear and it was a bitch, but I finally got it off. I'm not sure what to do in the case of a front except for slowly drilling out the stud a little at a time. Just be sure the first drill starts smack in the center. Good luck.
 

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I'm a son of a Firestone dealer, veteran of many stripped lugs, spinning studs, etc..

First, why did it happen after threading on a few threads while not cross threaded?

Many times the studs threads will grab some aluminum from your wheel if not careful de-mounting and re-mounting it on the hub. This causes the lug nut to thread on first few threads fine, THEN it will jam up like using powdered aluminum lock-tite, either right away, or at your next tire rotation, etc...

One of my favorite, fastest tricks, depends on if you have room around the lug nuts to break the stud off.

If you have room, here's how.

Tighten the rest of the nuts, put the car on the ground in gear with P-brake on so it won't roll, place a good tight fitting deep socket on the nut as far as it will go, add a long 1/2" extention, and stand on it. Then pull up, back and forth, usually only takes a couple flips and it will snap the stud right off.

Down-side, depending on how close the offending nut is to the wheel (that's why you tighten the other lugs) it may tweak/dent the tapered lug seat on an alloy wheel, or dent/damage the adjacent portion of a three dimensional wheel design (like ours), so use this method at your own descression.

Otherwise, the drilling out the stud is a good method, but time consuming.

NOW, if the stud was spinning in the hub, did the stud hole get damaged to the point a new stud will not press fit tight enough?

If not too bad, you could swedge the hole with a hammer and chisel until it's hard to get the stud in again, and use lock-tite. Or have a new stud welded in, or replace the hub. Every case is different.

If the hub is OK, replacing the stud is easy, especially if there is room behind the hub to do it on the car. Pop it thru with a big hammer and punch, then pull the new one in with a impact gun, and an open lug nut flat side to hub, with a couple greased washers as thrust washers. Just make sure it's pulled all the way in, and the stud's flange is flush with the back of the hub.


Good luck, and please post your resolution.
 

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^^ Nice trick! Thanks for the insight. Hopefully the stud isn't so loose it just wiggles up & down..

"Tighten the rest of the nuts, put the car on the ground in gear with P-brake on so it won't roll, place a good tight fitting deep socket on the nut as far as it will go, add a long 1/2" extention, and stand on it. Then pull up, back and forth, usually only takes a couple flips and it will snap the stud right off."

On the rear (IRS) stud that came loose on me I had to Dremel two flat spots on the back of the stud so I could get a pair of Vise Grips to hold it. Then, I was able to just twist the nut off (luckily).

Good luck with the repair.
 

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Thanks Dave, I love your signiture line about hearing God laugh. It reminds me of what Robbie Kneivel said his Dad's pre-jump prayer was.

"Hey God, watch this!"
 

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Cobrabilly,

Nice write up with some good info!

Tom,

I had a couple of other thoughts in addition to what Cobrabilly wrote. If the stud is spinning in the hub, that means the interferance fit of the slpine on the stud to the hub has been compremised. Maybe you can put a socket and extention on the lug and use a hammer to lightly tap it backwards to expose the spined area on the reverse side of the hub. Then using a grinder or cut off wheel, remove the sholder and poke thought to the front. It's been a while since I looked at this are on my build so I'm not sure if this is physically possible.

Another idea would be to use a center punch on the rear of the stud to deform the stud into the hub for a tighter fit and giv it a go. If your lucky, the nut will break free or the stud will shear. This may have the same issue as above with access.

Either way, good luck!

-SGC
 

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Tom, any luck? How'd ya do it?
 

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Wow, TOM!

It's time to come in and have a bite to eat. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks all for the ideas! I ended up drilling the lug until it was paper thin, then put a socket with a 12" extension on it and broke the nut off by wiggling it back and forth. There was enough lug nut to put a box end wrench on it so it wouldn't spin while drilling. My son held the wrench while I drilled.
I then pulled the hub and pressed in a new lug bolt. All lugs now have anti-seeze on them.
Thanks again!
Tom
 

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Good job. Nice to see a car fixed and then nice to see you post how you did it.

Just watch the anti-seeze. It has it's uses, but I've seen it cause problems with lug nuts and wheels.

The guys who figured out torque specs on the lugs (or any fastener) took into account the friction between the threads.

Years ago, one of our employees (his own car) put too much lube on the threads and it got in the tapered seat also, and with no friction the lug nuts opened up the tapered holes in the wheel before he stopped turning the wrench. Ruined his own wheel.

Basically saw it happen live-in-person, and I don't want to see guys doing that again.

Not riduculing, or saying you had a bad idea, it's just not really needed on the threads, and I've seen it cause problems.

Clean, debris free threads are fine.

Glad you got it fixed, and I bet you son was fired up to help.
 
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