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Discussion Starter #1
I have a good opportunity to by a solid engine and transmission, but it will still be some time before I will have enough saved to by the FFR roadster. Any recommendations for storing an engine and transmission long term? I am thinking I should rotate the assembly periodically, but if I drain fluids, that may not be a good idea.

Can some of you hard core gear heads steer me in the right direction?
 

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Spray oil into the carb until the engine chokes down. NOW make sure when you restart it you change the plugs after it clears out. The oil will coat everything and keep any micro rust from forming on the cylinder walls. When you live down south it's a comon pratice for long term storage, if you have a boat it's a must or your really in trouble. Things you must do for long term storage..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for the pointers cwhoofgator! Should I worry about rotating the crank every once in a while, or will that not help?
 

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I have never worried about turning it over, you may remove the oil from the cylinder walls if you do. I have not had one sit over a year so maybe Gordon should advise on that. We fogged a motor a couple of years ago and the guy decided to stroke it, when we pulled it apart it was fine so I know the process works.. Cheers
 

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I have an engine stored for over 10 years

I have a rebuilt engine stored for 10 years. Not my original plan but things sometimes get in the way.

It had plenty of assembly grease and oil during assembly and the oil pump had some light grease in it.

Wrapped in plastic and kept insulated from the concrete floor to avoid a cold block that could cause condensation both internally and externally.

Basement is very dry in the summer but I still run a dehumidifier for reasons other than the engine. (Woodworking shop) A cold engine block from the cool basement floor and the warm moist air of summer could really be a problem.

I do not ventilate the basement in the summer but as stated above I dehumidify it. I don't want the moist summer air in the basement.

I just recently opened it up(plastic) and turned it over. No problem and looked inside through a side cover plate over the lifters. Looked very clean. Cylinders are spotless. Head is off and still needs assembly.

My recommendations:

I would change the oil and filter as the present oil may have contaminates and water in it. Then run it if you can using the fogger. If not pull the plugs and spray the fogger into the cylinders through the plug hole and replace the plugs to help keep moisture out. Turn the engine over as you do this to get it all over the cylinder walls and rings.

When you bring it out of storage change the oil and filter again. As you put oil into the engine make sure you get it to run over the cam as much as you can. To do that you'd have to remove the valve covers.

One of the neat things about some of the old sports cars and some of the FF Roadsters is the ignition switch being separate from the starter switch. Especially with the lower zinc content of oil today it is a good idea to turn the engine over until you've got pressure showing on the gauge. Then turn the ignition on and start it.

Carburetors/Fuel Injectors and lines should be cleaned out of all gasoline by burning it until the engines run out of fuel in line or carb. But then you have a problem with fogging and leaving fuel in the lines etc.

Just got to remove all fuel to avoid evaporation of it leaving a varnish behind which can cause problems upon start up. Gas today only has a shelf life of up to six months. It is important to when storing cars for the winter to add a fuel stabilizer to increase its shelf life.

I'm sure some others will add to this list but these are my thoughts for now.

George
 

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You can also loosen the rocker arms to seat all the valves which will help seal the cylinder and relieve pressure on some of the valve springs.
 

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All good advice.

When you get ready to start it back up:
-Add oil
-turn it over by hand first
-If it turns over then I'd prime it and start it up for about a minute.
-Drain that oil and put new oil in.
 
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