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FFCobra Captain
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last night while working on the ride height, I noticed that the square tube that goes from left left shock over to the right shock is open on both ends. This is the piece where they weld on the frame number.

When I shone the flashlight in there, I noticed it has some light rust all throughout.

I live down here in FL where the humidity is pretty high almost year round, so things rust faster.

Do I need to worry about this? I didn't know if filling up the end of the tubes with something like Great Stuff would stop further rusting or if it's something I should even worry about.
 

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Don't fill the ends of the tube up w/ foam...that'll just serve to TRAP the moisture. If you're worried about it, maybe put a rag on a piece of wire, dip it in a can of rustoleum, and drag it back and forth through the tube a few times.
 

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Wade, I'm curious (not argumentative) - if you foam the ends and seal the moisture in the tube, won't the moisture form a certain amount of rust until all of the O2 (Oh-2) is consumed and then the process halts? What am I missing here?
 

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What about the two round frame rails? They're exposed to air through the holes in the back, bottom of the tubes. I haven't worried about it too much but does anyone have an answer on how to rust protect the ID of the rails?

Rick
 

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Hey Dan - my 186,000 mile 15 year old donor had a pretty good layer of rust on lots of things under the car :D . If my car lasts for 15 years and 150,000 miles I will replace/ repair the rusty parts.

Really though, I thought that a layer of rust will eventually act as a seal to protect the underlying metal from O2 unless there is some action to break open the surface.

 

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You guys are hitting all around the answer on this one. The rust itself forms a protective oxide layer and significantly reduces the rate of oxidation once the surface is coated. Water chemistry in various industrial processes is initially established to quickly form the same type of protective oxide layer in fluid systems, so that the long term wastage is minimized. As long as the layer is left undisturbed, it won't be a problem.
 

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Tony,
With all due respect, that's true only if it actually seals itself over and the humidity doesn't get heavy enough to create an electrolytic environment in there.
You should see what happens to bridge girders when dirt, salt and junk form a "poultice" on the undisturbed steel surfaces.
Seeing as Dan lives in Ft Lauderdale and the frames are not made of Cor-Ten or another type of alloy that actually will seal itself, what's the harm in coating it? Otherwise Dan's gonna spend the rest of his time with his car wondering what the inside of that pipe looks like and wishing he'd have done something when he had the chance. Just my $.02.
Dan, Tony might just be right but I'd coat it anyway, if for no other reason than so you don't have to think about it anymore. Where's the harm?

d.



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Guys, there are some options you can use other than trying to get POR-15 or some other paint all the way into the tubes. The other options all need to be reapplied occasionally, but they tend to coat tubes and surfaces well even without a direct line of sight to the surface that needs protecting.

The old fashioned method is Paraffin Wax and Paraffin (Kerosene) mixed together and sprayed on. You can buy it premixed as WaxOyl, used to undercoat LBCs. (Little British Cars)

The modern tools are Boeshield and CorrosionX. Both of those are long term surface protectants that are fogged into a space and coat all the surfaces, forming a barrier to oxygen and water. Reapply yearly or thereabouts. We use them all the time on airplanes where the insides of the tailcones are nearly inaccessible. Even works on floatplanes exposed to saltwater and salt air.

Hope this helps!

Futuristic
 

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The Drag the rag method looked pretty messy so I just took a can of Rustoleum spray paint that matched my frame paint and sprayed it in all of the open tubes. After removing the bigger visible chunks of course. It appears to have covered all of the surface areas inside of the tubes top and bottom the entire length of the tubes. Just make sure that you wear a long sleeve shirt and glove otherwise you will have overspray all over you. Especially when coating the tubes that only have one open end.

Good Luck!
 

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Wade & NAGA have it right. Stretch out a coat hanger, cut up some rags and tie it to the hanger, dip in POR-15, and swab the insides of the tube. You'll never have to worry about it again.

If you want, once the paint is dry I fabricated aluminum covers for the ends of the tubes. As I installed the covers, I applied a pretty liberal coat of silicone to seal everything up. The insides of the tubes on #3928 aren't going to rust in this lifetime.
 

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FFCobra Captain
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
With all the rivets in the tube, won't the rag get hung up.

Thanks to some of the ideas here, I was thinking about using my garage vacuum cleaner (pretty trashed already) and putting that on one end of the tube...and standing on the other end and using my rustoleum spray paint. I'd think that the slight vacuum would help pull the material through and help coat the inside.

Think that would work?
 

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Hey Dan, at least your hair won't catch on fire when the vacuum clean explodes! :D :D

All the best,
Tag
 

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I bought some spray on "frame rust protectant" from Eastwood. It's a waxy oily stuff, probably exactly what Futuristic was referring to. I sprayed it into each end of the tube (and many other places) and I think it got a good coverage. I know it went all the way through because I had to wash it off the side of my wife's mini-van when I was done :) -Bret
 

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LOL Don from your heads up reply to the vacuum idea. I haven't laughed out loud for a while and needed that. I'm still laughing as I write this and thinking how lucky my son and I are for not killing ourselves yet while we experiment with various solutions to problems with our build. This forum is a life saver!
 

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this topic was just what i needed...

as a new owner of an FFR roadster, i ordered mine without the powder coating ($695 dollars at the time of ordering will go to other engine parts).

so here's my question. what to use to coat or paint the frame, and avoid rust, and make it look decent? We don't deal with a lot of rain or humidity here in Southern California, so rust isn't a huge deal i'm assuming.

Budget is definatly a concern...for my wife! :D

thanks in advance for your reply
 
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