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FFCobra Fanatic
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My sleeves were covering the sticker so I had to disassemble to see the date which is just below the part number. I have FFR 7330 which was delivered in Sept of 2010 and the shocks that came with mine have 38-2009 so I am good. Hope this helps.

Mike
 

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Lifetime Journeyman
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As said above, jacked up front end for full droop. Couldn't get the sleeve to move enough to see the label. Marked the sleeve/ring and then ran the adjustment ring all the way to the top. The sleeve then dropped enough to read the label. 7172, delivered March 2010, not even close: 28 - 2008. Looks like the affected cars would be WELL after Feb 2010.
 

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Snake Farmer
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"It was quickly determined by the technical guys at KONI that the root cause of the failure was due to a cold weld"

Cold weld? What does that really mean anyway? Does that mean the welder amperage was set to low, so the joining of the two pieces was compromised?

Why would more than that one defective shock be affected? Is this done by a robot, so several in a row may have been cold welded?
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Cold cracks
Hydrogen induced delayed cold Weld-cracking occurs as a consequence of contamination with this gas being absorbed in the molten metal while welding. Hydrogen sources should be avoided and removed: not only water and humidity must be controlled by drying and preheating. Organic matter contamination has to be removed by cleaning and good housekeeping.
Three conditions are necessary for the formation of cold cracks: the presence of a certain stress, of a suitable microstructure and at least a critical level of hydrogen.
A long standing theory claimed that atomic hydrogen moving interstitially within the solid metal aggregated to molecular form with pressure increase sufficient to tear apart metallic bonds.
This has been recently challenged and replaced by a competing model involving the presence of preexisting defect sites in the metal, where, under stress, hydrogen preferentially diffuses, reducing the local cohesive strength. Fracture occurs when the remaining strength falls below the intensified stress level. Hydrogen would then accumulate in the newly generated voids and the process would repeat itself.
Hydrogen induced Weld-cracking is a serious cause for concern especially with high strength steels. Preheat and postheat procedures, depending on material type but also on thickness and joint constraints, are commonly employed to reduce the danger of hydrogen Weld-cracking.
The purposes are to eliminate water, to reduce cooling rate in order to avoid dangerous structures (untempered martensite), to temper and soften this hard structure if formed, to reduce and relieve thermal stresses, and to allow for hydrogen gas to escape if entrapped.
 

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I took delivery in Feb 2010 and just my rears were affected.
Called Koni and Tom said it would normally be about a 10 day turn around and considering the holiday maybe a few days longer!. Sent
mine back on Thursday, so we shall see.
 

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Snake Farmer
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Odd how there was a gap of unaffected shocks from the 8th week production through to the 12th week, then for some reason on the 13th week, again the (30-1721) were affected?:confused:

Could these be the only ones that have failed..so far, that they are aware of? What about the weeks bordering these?
 

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My guess is that there are no bordering weeks of production. FFR must order a quantity at once that gives them the best price, then waits until they need more to order again. My July 2010 kit had Feb 2010 shocks...
 

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Not a waxer
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Odd how there was a gap of unaffected shocks from the 8th week production through to the 12th week, then for some reason on the 13th week, again the (30-1721) were affected?:confused:
For a limited production item such as these they are undoubtedly produced in batches, then the line is either not run at all or more likely switched over to other products. There were probably no FFR spec shocks manufactured between the 7th and 13th week.

My sleeves were covering the sticker so I had to disassemble to see the date which is just below the part number.
I just got back from Steve's house after checking his on the indy14 car. Turns out they are from the affected lots (kit delivered at the first of July 2010). Even at full droop the date code was not visible but if you pop the sleeve retaining clip from it's groove and slide it along the shock body towards the eye you can get the sleeve moved far enough to view the sticker without having to pull the wheels, remove the coilover or disassemble anything.

Jeff

_________
 

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I just received a written copy of the recall notice in the mail today in addition to the e-mail I received on the 20th.
 

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Got my letter in the mail today and checked my shocks.
As luck would have it, the stickers were on the inside and upside down.

Tip: I held a small Led light in one hand, pointed at the sticker and my iPhone camera in the other hand and took about 6 photos of the front shocks and 6 of the rear shocks (they were different batches).

I was fighting the F-Panel on the front shocks and the IRS framing in the rear.

With the pictures, I was able to go through them, find a clear picture and even expand the picture to easily read it.

Fortunately, my shocks are not recalled. I'm glad. :001_smile:
 

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Are the pairs of each shock (front pair an rear pair) from the same batches? As in do I need to check both rear shocks, or can I just check one rear and one front?
 

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Mine are stamped on the body of the shocks

I have an older set in stock and the numbers are on the end of the body above the spring clip that the threaded sleeve rests on.
Mike
It looks like they sent the alert to pretty much everyone that bought them. I bought a set of 30-1720 Koni front coilovers to two replace two old Bilsteins in July, 2009. Mine can't be in the affected runs, which were in 2010. I checked anyway, in case something comes up in the future with other runs. My silver sticker looks different and the FFR Number (14622), the Model Number (30-1720), and the date code on mine is on stamped on the end of the body above the sleeve, as Mike said. My date code appears to be just 4 digits, 1409.

Charlie
 

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Got lucky - but decided to invert the rear coil overs

A shout out to those who advised to check both the front and rear sets. Indeed, mine were different. The fronts I could see the sticker plain as day. The rears no such luck, but as I was standing there pondering my next move, I noticed I still had not yet tossed the box in the trash.

The number is also on the box! So I didn't have to touch a thing.

However, after browsing other threads on this forum, I decided to invert the rear coil overs because it sure looked like they were going to interfere with the mounting brackets. Yet another nugget of wisdom from this forum.....
 

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iBuild
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Greg, wow hard to believe it was that long ago. This is a great help though, I pulled the trigger and bought a set from another forum member before FFR started the 1/2 price sale.

If you got your Konis when FFR initially offered them at 1/2 price after the final "recall" on the "new and improved" Bildsteins, that was Nov 2008.

Greg
 

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Yes, a "cold weld" is caused by incorrect welding parameters, such as amperage being set too low. The result is lack of fusion and or incomplete penetration.

Cold cracking, such as hydrogen induced cracking, is not related to a "cold weld".

I assume Koni has a record of welding parameters and used that to establish which batches of shocks were affected. Eric

"It was quickly determined by the technical guys at KONI that the root cause of the failure was due to a cold weld"

Cold weld? What does that really mean anyway? Does that mean the welder amperage was set to low, so the joining of the two pieces was compromised?

Why would more than that one defective shock be affected? Is this done by a robot, so several in a row may have been cold welded?
 

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1st build
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All 4

Just checked and all for of mine are bad. I was able to see the date on all of them installed after it was jacked up. Looks like it's time to detail the underside wile she is in the air.
 

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Has anyone got their replacement shocks yet. Sending mine in tomorrow, but really need the car back together January 23rd. Just trying to gauge how long it has taken to get the new ones.
 

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I doubt anyone has theirs yet. Mine went in the day after I got the e-mail, and UPS Tracking said that my shipment was being held at Koni's request all last week. They were probably shut down for the holidays. My shipment was delivered to them today.
 
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