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Discussion Starter #1
Ok still getting into my car. I have some gauges that are not quite right, or working. So I am going to replace them all with Autometers, unless someone has a better idea. Here's the deal. There are small glass/chrome bezels that fit into holes in the dash. They cover the mustang gauges that are behind. (Is the normal)?? Anyway is it possible to remove these and the gauge panel or whatever its called and put in mechanical gauges? I don't want to mess up the wiring, I'm assuming that there's a plug from the harness back there? Is this the way the kit came? I thank you all,
Mike
 

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Since no one else has answered, I dug out my Mk 4 manual and read through the pertinent sections on donor gauge installation.
The chrome ringed glass bezels you mentioned are just press fit. You should be able to pry them out. That will be the only easy part in changing your gauges.
You do not mention your Mk number, engine type, wiring harness, etc, so my following response is a best guess.
The gauges and gauge pod will have been separated during the donor part modification. The gauge pod will be mounted to the firewall (see the first picture).
The gauge panel will have been cut into pieces and attached to the dash with screws from the front (see pictures 2 & 3)
The dash covering is then glued over the front covering the screws and making it nearly impossible to remove the gauges without damaging the dash.
When the assembled dash is attached to the car, jumper wires are run from the gauges to the appropriate connections on the gauge pod (picture 4).

It may be easier to get your current gauges working than replacing the dash and rewiring the car to instal new gauges.
IMG_1595.jpeg IMG_1596.jpeg IMG_1597.jpeg IMG_1598.jpeg

HTH
Norm
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Oh wow and thank you for that ray of sunshine. Its an MK3 with an 87 GT mustang as donor. 5.0 HO 5 speed. Im going to do all mechanical gauges. (Except tach, Volt meter) Ok I had already figured out the bezels and removed one and measured the opening. The Tach is acting funny, the temp is not working and the oil pressure is all weird also. I figured if I was gonna waste money on an oil pressure sender and water temp sender and its not them, Id just waste money on a full set of Autometer mechanical gauges. Oh, speedo cable is also jacked up at that speed sensor deal at the trans. Was thinking a GPS Speedo, No Cable no BS. Tach, was just going to run new wires to the dist or coil, and the oil and water will be hard lines to the block. so this is turning into a bigger issue than I thought, wow. So basically I have to rip out the dash, hoping not to screw it up. oh wow. Thank you for telling me this. I am still learning the car and I bought it, I did not build it. Hmm So maybe if I cut around the screws under the vinyl I can remove the dash and get to it all. ?? Hmmmm
 

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As I remember it that printed circuit is huge w/ easily visible paths to the gauges. I think w/ some study that you could figure which wire goes to which gauge, and what it's function is so you can then run the wire to the new gauges. Maybe a bit tedious but doable.
 

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Obviously there is not much you'd be able to do with your problem with out getting into the wiring. My first thought is that the gauges themselves very rarly give problems in their oem setting. These however have been sliced and diced, had wires spliced and so on. That being said I would first check all the connections behind the dash to make sure they are all still good. I suspect you might find issues there. If you don't want to get into this deep enough to change to new gauges and find that something is wrong with some of the existing stuff I'm sure an add in the classifieds would get you a replacement OEM guage cluster pretty quick.
 

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If you're going to replace the dash and gauges - you might as well just start fresh with a new dash blank - at least you can switch between them as you get familiar with all the connections.

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good idea but Right now Im just going to replace all the electric gauges with mechanical. Only need a light power source. I have never trusted electric but may try a GPS speedo. I hear good things and one less cable to go bad. Maybe not though. Wont have to worry about much of nothing with a cable. But thanks guys. I was worried about whats behind the dash. Now I almost know. Should not be that bad? Just unplug or unwire and tape off what is not needed. The fox mustang sites I have been on say the tach and fuel level have issues commonly.
 

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If the car builder installed the gages as directed by the manual it might not be as difficult to remove them as I originally thought. Once you have the bezels off you could use a large cutoff wheel on a Dremel tool or small die grinder to reach behind the dash through the hole in front of the gauge to cut off the screws.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It looks as tho he did. I can only hope. The paperwork I have says it was professionally built in 08 I believe. It appears to be quality work from my looking so far. I just wanted what I got from you guys here. Some expert guidance. Thanks Mike
 

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I acquired a FF-MKII several years ago, that was equipped a set of replica Smiths, vintage looking gauges, that didn’t work, at all well. The gas gauge was off by more than a quarter tank, and no matter what speed I was actually driving, the speedometer said I was doing about 47 MPH max. I also had difficulty having a clear field of vision to both the speedo and tack because of their location in the dash, and the position of the steering wheel. I opted to redo my entire dash and ultimately, I tore out the original Ford, whatever it was wiring harness, and I rewired the entire car, but that another story. I redesigned my dash and moved all gauges and controls to a self-contained center control panel. After 4 or 5 days of research, I purchased a new set of electronic gauges, with traditional looking analog dials, but with modern digital electronics and LED illumination, for a company called GlowShift. The speedo and tach have 3-7/8” dials, and 3-1/2“ bodies. All the other gauges have 2-3/16” dials, with 2-1/16” bodies. The speedo is GPS. The LED illumination is user configurable with seven (7) different color options, including several shades of dark and light blue, red, green, purple, and yellow. When the gauges are not energized, the set I have, has dark, smoked gray lenses, so the actual gauge faces are only viewable once the key is turned on and the gauges are powered up. Each gauge came with a variety of mounting accessories, making installation a snap. Each gauge came with a 5 conductor pigtail, fitted with a connector that plugs into the back of the accompanying gauge. The opposite end each gauge was left undressed for splicing into your existing wiring. Color function is as follows: YEL constant battery, RED switched 12 VDC, BLK ground, GRN gauge input, and ORG illumination dimmer (optional), which reduces the brightness of the gauge by 30% when the headlights are turned, to help the driver’s night vision. Initially the gas gauge and the speedo were not accurate, and had to be calibrated. The specification page for the gas gauge had instructions for calibration, and after one adjustment, it has been dead on balls accurate ever since. Initially the speedo was inaccurate and off by more than 30 MPH. When the calibration instruction did not produce the necessary correction, I called GlowShift tech support. They gave me some additional calibration instructions, and since applying them, the speedo has also been dead on balls accurate. The only time the speedo acts up is when I go through one of the tunnels here that are over a mile long. In the tunnel, the antenna for the speedo loses contact with the GPS satellite, so after a few seconds, the speedo, drops to 0 MPH, and remains that way until exiting the tunnel, when the antenna can reacquire the GPS satellite again. As soon as the GPS system resynchs with the car in a new location, it interprets the difference as a huge increase in speed, and for 3 or 4 seconds, it says I’m doing 130 MPH. As soon as a second signal sample is made, the speedo decreases to the proper speed. To facilitate initial installation and long term maintenance, I fitted each gauge pigtail with a Weather Pack waterproof connector, and dressed all the wires with braided, split-side, self-wrapping wire loom, from Alex Tech. I did the same for the wipers, the 4-way hazard flashers I installed and all other controls and instrumentation. By unscrewing just 3 hex key button head screws in the dash, and disconnecting about 10 Weather Pack connectors, I can remove the entire control console including the stereo system and the two front speakers in about 15 minutes so I can work on it out of the car in comfort at a work bench. If you’re a Cobra purist that wants a more, Old School Traditional” look, this may not be the way to go, but if you want reliability, and modern digital technology, with a traditional analog look. Check out GlowShift’s product various gauge sets.
 

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