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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On my MKIII I'm going to run 93 Mustang power brakes. So I will have to modify the 3/4 tube for booster clearance.
Is there any reason to weld, as opposed to bolting in the replacement piece? I've seen it done both ways. The tube is not at all strong and I don't believe that the way it is mounted that it can be much of a safety issue. If the replacement piece was bolted securely fore & aft(say 3 or 4 evenly spaced Grade 8 bolts), I believe that it would be just as strong as the original part.
Any thoughts?
Oh, we're not talking asthetics here, just functionality.
Thanks, Jeff
 

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Shouldn't be a problem.

2FAST
 

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I heard that Whitby Motorcars sells a kit to alter the tube to install boosters. I hope the rumor is correct, cuz I'd like to do the same thing. Troy.
 

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FFCobra Master Craftsman
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I understand that Whitby's does sell a kit and other components (M/C, remote filler). The Whitby piece is solid 3/4" steel bar bent to shape around the booster. The advantage is that it keeps the lower tube at the same elevation and it has to be super-rigid since it is "billet". I've seen others do it in a very simple way by making 1 cut at the front of the foot box then bending the tube down about 1" and out about 3/8" to clear the booster. It can then be welded or you can fabricate a bracket out of some angle iron or some heavy steel plate (you can buy some shapes at Home Depot such as super heavy gate hardware and pound/cut them into something useful).

I'm going with the do-it-yourself bolt on. From what I can see, this tube just serves to hang aluminum.

Whatever you do, don't install the "F" panel until you complete this mod.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys, I appreciate the thoughts.
Jeff
 

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I bought the bolt in piece from Jeff at Whitby's. It is cut from solid steel and is drilled and threaded at both ends. I liked it because my welding sucks.

Basically, all you do is measure, cut the 3/4" tube, drill the holes for the bolts, install the piece, and tighten the bolts. Could not be any simpler. And it is a stout piece.

Cai
 

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OK Guys - on this subject:

I just fit my pedal box into place and the steering flange bearing in the front of the footbox. (I'm mounting the flange bearing on the inside so as not to interfere with the booster per some posts from Paul over the past few months that were really helpful).

First, the pedal box doesn't sit very well (flush) against the front wall. Second, it looks like I'll have to cut away some of the pedal box face plate (against the wall) so that it doesn't interfere with mounting the steering flange bearing.

Are you finding these same issues?
 

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DMW,

There were two problems with my pedal box. First, there is a flat piece of metal connecting the lower holes (I think this is the piece you're talking about)...it had to be removed to clear the flange bearing. Removing it was easy. The second problem was, as you described, the box didn't sit flush with the firewall. I ended up cutting off one of the back (closer to the driver) "ears" and beating the other with a hammer to get the box to tilt and sit flush with the firewall. For the ear I cut off, I made a new one from some steel I got from Home Depot and bolted it in place. All this allowed the pedal box to sit flush with the firewall, but caused a new problem. The back part of the box now sits lower and the steering shaft hit the top of the pedal box (near the back, close to the driver). I used a dremel tool and a hack saw to remove some material from the pedal box so the steering shaft would clear. I have some pictures, but may not be able to post or send them until this weekend. Hope all this makes sense.

One more thing. I thought the pedal box didn't sit flush because the firewall was welded at the wrong angle. When I started fitting the aluminum, it and the pedal box would have fit much better if the firewall was at a slightly different angle.

Hope this helps,
Paul

[ November 04, 2004, 06:45 AM: Message edited by: PaulF ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
DMW,
As I was fitting my pedal box, I found the same things with respect to fitting. I drew the front four bolt holes to the pedal wall with clamps and vise grips and then got a long crowbar and moved the pedal assy around at the back end. I was able to bend everything to where I needed it/ keep it straight & level and all 8 mounting points will be utilized. As for the steering shaft bearing, I'm gonna try & mount it outside & space the booster forward alittle to clear. If that doesn't work, then you do have to cut off the lower part of the pedal box bracket that would interfere.
Jeff
 

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Jeff,

I kept my donor's plastic spacer (a square with 4 approx 1/4" lugs that matches the profile of the booster bolt pattern). It looks like I can mount this on the outside which would then give space for the steering flange bearing on the outside. Also, it will be the exact spacing configuration as the donor - something I'd feel good about.

I have to say that PaulF (note above) has really been the pioneer of power brakes in the MK III. He posted some great photos a few months ago, which you've probably seen, and has been really helpful with questions. Thanks again Paul.
 

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Here's a picture of my pedal box. You can see the bracket bolted in place of the ear that was removed and you can see that I removed some metal so the steering shaft would clear.

Paul


 

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I just completed my power brake booster install this weekend. I cut the lower 3/4" outboard tube at the footbox, bent it straight down slightly so that it was directly below its original location but 3/4" lower (the top of the cut tube aligns with the bottom of the uncut tube), then made a plate from 1/8" steel (1 1/2" by 6") to fasten this loose tube to its original other half using 4 1/4" bolts with Locktite Red. I painted the whole thing with POR and it looks just like the powdercoating. Besides welding, another way to do this would be to slide a solid 5/8" bar inside the cut tube (a perfect, tight fit) and fasten with screws to the bottom of the original. The problem here is that drilling a 5/8" bar takes forever.

I used the Ford factory 1/4" booster spacer from the Mustang and mounted the steering shaft bearing on the driver's side of the pedal box. I also had to hammer a dent into the booster (where it rubs the steering shaft bearing) using the round head of a ball peen hammer while holding the booster on my lap to avoid too much vibration or damage elsewhere. This was easy - the steel is soft. I then notched the top of the pedal box nearest the passenger so that I will have flexibility in raising the shaft angle for more leg room if I decide to do this later. I found that my pedal box was a bad fit initially but I cranked it down at the four holes on the front wall and the other four contact points lined up nicely against the 3/4" tubes on their own. One other issue was the bracket for the brake pedal switch. I mounted this on the opposite side of the pedal box direcly across from its original location because I found that it was interfering with the steering shaft operation.

So far everything seems to be working out well. The one concern I have is that the brake pedal bottoms against the steering shaft bearing mounting plate now that I mounted the bearing on the inside of the pedal box. I don't think this is a big deal because the pedal is only about 1/4" higher than where it would have bottomed against the front pedalbox wall if the bearing were located on the engine side.

All of these ideas and procedures are from some earlier posts but mainly from swapping e-mails with PaulF (above). I'm just relating my story.
 

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I thought that on the Mk III one of the modifications FFR did to the frame was to allow the optional use of a power booster without having to modify the frame. Is this not right?

Geoff
 

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Geoff,

For the FOX boosters you still have to do the mods, even on a MK III. The later model Mustangs have a different setup (engine mounted) but I never looked into this technology so don't know the first thing about it.
 
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