Factory Five Racing Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Curious George
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
for those with gloveboxes, seems that you could run a few long lines via the trans tunnel and put the heater in the trunk behind the seats, and offer some other ways to pipe in heat?
 

·
FFCobra Craftsman
Joined
·
22,111 Posts
Yep, easy enough to do. The only problem is getting the heat into the footwells which is generally the best place for it.
 

·
Not a waxer
Joined
·
11,549 Posts
While you could mount the core and blower at the back I think you would find it would become rather complex and use up a fair amount of critical space getting coolant from the engine to the trunk and then bringing warm air back to the front to the foot box area where it’s really needed.

Jeff
 

·
FFCobra Craftsman
Joined
·
22,111 Posts
Have you done this?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
No not at all. I used to work on Lexus for a living and their larger SUVs often had a separate heater for the rear of the cabin. Never needed to work on one but could see the coolant lines running back from the engine area. They were well insulated in something like this stuff you can buy at HD or Lowes.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Frost-King-1-in-x-6-ft-Foam-Plumbing-Tubular-Pipe-Insulation/1060007
But they had the heater core near where they wanted to put the heat. The problem in an FFR is getting the heat to the front. I could see building the trans tunnel as usual and then adding maybe 1.5 inches on the top so you have a duct from the rear bulkhead toward the shifter where it splits in two. Then it gets tough. Most of us end up resting our right leg against the side of the foot box so your duct could drop down along the side of the trans tunnel between the front of the seat and lower firewall to the floor and be pointed forward. I got to say, all this just to have a glovebox? It will be a heck of a lot easier to do a normal heat/AC install and do a shelf or glove box in the rear bulkhead.
https://www.breezeautomotive.com/shop/cockpit-storage-cubby-kit-for-mk4-roadster/
 

·
Curious George
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
No not at all. I used to work on Lexus for a living and their larger SUVs often had a separate heater for the rear of the cabin. Never needed to work on one but could see the coolant lines running back from the engine area. They were well insulated in something like this stuff you can buy at HD or Lowes.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Frost-King-1-in-x-6-ft-Foam-Plumbing-Tubular-Pipe-Insulation/1060007

But they had the heater core near where they wanted to put the heat. The problem in an FFR is getting the heat to the front. I could see building the trans tunnel as usual and then adding maybe 1.5 inches on the top so you have a duct from the rear bulkhead toward the shifter where it splits in two. Then it gets tough. Most of us end up resting our right leg against the side of the foot box so your duct could drop down along the side of the trans tunnel between the front of the seat and lower firewall to the floor and be pointed forward. I got to say, all this just to have a glovebox? It will be a heck of a lot easier to do a normal heat/AC install and do a shelf or glove box in the rear bulkhead.

https://www.breezeautomotive.com/shop/cockpit-storage-cubby-kit-for-mk4-roadster/


25th anniversary car comes with the glovebox - trying to figure it out


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
2007 Calendar Cover Car
Joined
·
2,678 Posts
I posted on the other forum (reposted below) but also came across this pic (not my car), now I can’t find the thread.




Here’s my post:
Somewhat similar thought, I’m thinking about mounting the fan under the top of the foot box, then moving the heater core further forward on the firewall. Connect the two with some flex hose. I don’t think putting the fan in this location would be intrusive, but I have to so some more measurements.

This would help in two ways: draw air from the cockpit rather than the engine bay, and give more room behind the dash.
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
6,288 Posts
My Way...

I mounted my "Southern Air" A/C / Heater unit in the top of the passenger foot box. I cut a hole in the top and positioned the unit so the "cores" are below the level and the blower is above. I made a filter enclosure (using a standard K&N cone filter) and mounted it in the passenger front fender area and made some ducting to connect the fresh air to the filter, the filtered air to the blower and the air from the cores to the dash vents, foot box vents and defroster vents. That left me with ample room for the glove box which goes all the way to the firewall.

The main thing I don't like is that the blower is a little anemic on high speed, when you really want the extra volume. I also have seat heaters which help on very cold mornings. I plan on replacing the supplied blower fan with the fan from the Mustang donor. At the same time I will re-work a couple of my ducts to make the system work a little better, just one of those things that I picked up on with experience of how I initially set it up.

One nice thing I did is that I installed a heater water control/bypass valve, out of a Ranger pickup ('94 I think). It diverts the hot water to the passenger side head when heat is not needed. On my system the two cores are stacked so that the A/C unit had to over come the heated air from the heater core before the cockpit felt any effect. That meant that the A/C had to be operating on a much higher level than necessary to get any benefit.

Regards, Rick.
 

·
Not a waxer
Joined
·
11,549 Posts
25th anniversary car comes with the glovebox - trying to figure it out.
Simply cut the glove box down to a shallower depth to provide heater room---use it for papers and small items---then go with a rear bulkhead storage like Craig mentioned.

Jeff
 

·
FFCobra Craftsman
Joined
·
22,111 Posts
25th anniversary car comes with the glovebox - trying to figure it out
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Ahhh, I get it now. I didn't realize you already have the glovebox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,437 Posts
Yes and with heated seats

One person did mount the heater in the front of the trunk plumbed his air ducts into the cavity of the fiberglass vintage race seats. He cut outlet holes at the bottom front of the seats to exit the air into the low middle area of the cockpit. Pretty ingenious but those seats are relatively rare.
Question: Who has ever had their feet get too cold in a roadster?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,369 Posts
One person did mount the heater in the front of the trunk plumbed his air ducts into the cavity of the fiberglass vintage race seats. He cut outlet holes at the bottom front of the seats to exit the air into the low middle area of the cockpit. Pretty ingenious but those seats are relatively rare.
Question: Who has ever had their feet get too cold in a roadster?
My first long-range road trip was 400+ miles in late October. The temp started at 45*, an hour later, mid 30's. Had layered my upper body, but the cold air was blowing in the cockpit and finding it's way up my pants legs. So yes my feet and ankles where freezing. Stopped at a gas station and got some rubber bands and wrapped around the bottoms of my pants, helped some. So count me as a person who's had cold feet in a roadster, but then I've driven in a hail storm too. :surprise:
 

·
Not a waxer
Joined
·
11,549 Posts
...but then I've driven in a hail storm too. :surprise:
Well then that explains a lot! Repeated blows to the head like that will usually have long lasting effects >:)

Jeff
 

·
Junior Charter Member
Joined
·
2,851 Posts
I have a full sized glove box. I moved my heater to the middle.

If you are like me, you do not want to give up one inch of trunk space. When I go to events the trunk gets really full.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,408 Posts
Even though I have already stated my opinion about seat heaters, one other option that I will mention is the FFMetal firewall forward piece.

I think that it moves the firewall about 1.5 inches forward, but there might be other ways to get even move movement. At this time, I see no downside to doing this, and I would encourage you to get as much space behind the dash as possible. I would do it no matter what choices you will make for the heater.

The added benefit of moving from a .040 to a .090 thickness is also a good thing.

Derald.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
713 Posts
Thought I'd throw this out there. I created a box on top of the passenger footbox, and mounted the heater there. Hopefully this picture shows the setup clearly.
P4060118 by Rick Paul, on Flickr
 

·
Curious George
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Even though I have already stated my opinion about seat heaters, one other option that I will mention is the FFMetal firewall forward piece.



I think that it moves the firewall about 1.5 inches forward, but there might be other ways to get even move movement. At this time, I see no downside to doing this, and I would encourage you to get as much space behind the dash as possible. I would do it no matter what choices you will make for the heater.



The added benefit of moving from a .040 to a .090 thickness is also a good thing.



Derald.


Yes I guess I'd have to powder coat it black to match the 25th anniversary engine bay aluminum


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top