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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone,

I’ve been asked along with a long time colleague/friend to “rescue” a GTM build in Daytona Beach Florida. I’ve had good conversations on this forum and now the time has come to get down to business, and I was hoping to get some guidance.

This car was assembled with a Turn-Key LS2 and the Infinitybox system, along with a G50 transmission, but never actually ran. The quality of the build is questionable, and as far as we can tell it was stored in a barn for several years - lots of spider webs and animal droppings. We have cleaned it up and removed the bodywork, this weekend we are going to do a full inspection to determine what has to be done in order to make it safe.

I may have shared this before, but the attached picture will provide an example of why we are concerned - I think this car would have stopped running if not caught fire in pretty short order.

Would you all mind sharing insight on things we should do and look out for so we can come up with a “rescue plan”? At very least we’ll disassemble the corners and inspect all suspension/brakes/drivetrain parts, I assume it will need lots in terms of hoses, seals, etc, but if there’s anything particular to the GTM or updates we should do I would really appreciate your feedback.

Looking forward to sharing our process with you all as we bring this back to life!

Thanks,
Neel
362563
 

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You would be saving a ton of aggravation by disassembling it and pretty much starting over. at least to a point where you can see all the systems and clean up and reroute as required.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah that’s what we’re planning on, wondering what updates on the chassis etc we may want to look at, this chassis is over 10 years old.
 

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I'd say your "never actually ran" assumption might be wrong based on the melted wire loom above the cat. And yes, I would say that you're probably correct in your assumption that you wouldn't have driven it far without burning the whole thing to the ground.

Sounds like you already have a good feel for what needs to be done. Most of if just comes down to common sense. As far as "safety" upgrades, if it's a Gen I, you will want to make sure that you make sure it has some "cam bolt washers" installed as the donor cam bolt set up will not tighten up against the chassis properly and could cause a very dangerous situation. Also check the fuel tanks.....if they still just have the original setup with the 2 hard lines that connect the tanks at the bottom and not the -12 hose connecting the tanks, you will want to get that taken care of with the proper sealing kit (don't just use the white plastic seals provided with the FFR crossover kit.

The other thing you will need to check is to see if it has the upgraded rear lower shock mount or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Apologies, I should have said "car never drove." Yes, it ran long enough to melt wires, not long enough for any real evidence of a heat cycle - residue in the exhaust.
 

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I'd say your "never actually ran" assumption might be wrong based on the melted wire loom above the cat. And yes, I would say that you're probably correct in your assumption that you wouldn't have driven it far without burning the whole thing to the ground.

Sounds like you already have a good feel for what needs to be done. Most of if just comes down to common sense. As far as "safety" upgrades, if it's a Gen I, you will want to make sure that you make sure it has some "cam bolt washers" installed as the donor cam bolt set up will not tighten up against the chassis properly and could cause a very dangerous situation. Also check the fuel tanks.....if they still just have the original setup with the 2 hard lines that connect the tanks at the bottom and not the -12 hose connecting the tanks, you will want to get that taken care of with the proper sealing kit (don't just use the white plastic seals provided with the FFR crossover kit.

The other thing you will need to check is to see if it has the upgraded rear lower shock mount or not.

Shane, what do you mean by upgraded lower shock mount? How would one know which one they have?
 

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This is just for the rear lower shock mounts. The original ones from FFR would bend and break over time. They were just "open" on top where the shock bolts up. The new upgrade/fix was an additional bolt-on bracket that ran from the large 5/8" bolt over to the outer side of the shock bolt to sort of "close in" the top side of the shock mount behind the shock.
 

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Agree with everything Gordon and Shane said.

The aluminum radiator box will also need to be reinforced at the opening side so it does not expand and bottom out when driving on the freeway if that has not been done already.
 

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Make sure Koni dampers are correct side up. Some of them lose proper function if the can side (side with fluid/gas) is on top.
 

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How soon do you plan or wish to be running this car again? And what level of a car are you looking to build?

I can advise NOT to take it all apart, speaking from experience. Taking it apart takes about 1-2 days and reassembly can result in 1-2 years of work.

Corvette suspension parts are very durable. Uprights, bearings, A arms, all made to last.
Outside of that, what Shane said, the car requires two items: Locks for the lower control arm bolts (user crash sells kits) and lower shock mount upgrade.
Personally, I strongly advise to upgrade the shocks to get a fantastic ride that matches the timeless looks and longitudinal performance of the car.

All rubber hoses are clear items to review and likely replace on any car that's been sitting around:
- Rubber brake lines can be replaced/upgraded to steel braided, unless it has it already
-Fuel lines
  • Then check all AN fittings - best done when running, under pressure, and hot. If you tear it apart, you'll end up buying all new lines bc you won't be wanting to put in the old ones, which could be perfectly fine.
  • Master cylinders are low cost and although they are built to last, you'll have to look at the fluid and assess if you want to save around $100 or just replace for peace of mind

Wiring:
- Start with confirming all grounds and beep all fuses. Be suspicious about relays and the Corvette stalk module - as it ages or collects dust, things like high beam, turn indicators can operate intermittently and if you don't consider that module you might chase harness issues in the car that do not exist.

Add grounds if needed and create central ground points to avoid strange symptoms. That takes care of 99% of any wiring issues you might have otherwise.
After that the obvious; thermal and chafe secure all wiring. If you find a few issues with poor crimps, oxidized connectors, you'll likely find some more but no need to tear the whole car apart unless you are literally looking to make a full build.

Other items to make the car awesome for the long haul:
- Delete the front Corvette coolant reservoir and go to single reservoir in the engine bay above cyl head height

- If you take the body off do this:
--- add sound deadening EVERYWHERE you can imagine
--- put the coolant lines on the outside of the cockpit along the rockers instead of through the tunnel - helps hot day idle temperatures bc more volume and allows the cockpit to stay cool

  • Optional: Put wedges into the G50 rear transaxle mount to prevent the tail of the transmission to move left/right during cornering, increases shifting precision also in day to day driving
  • Optional: Put spacers at the top of the rear diffuser to make a few inches gap between body and diffuser (Gen2 style) - helps cooling
  • Optional: Invest in a direct replacement high quality radiator that holds more coolant and has more capacity
  • Optional: Reinforce the rear inner toe links mounts on the chassis (improves rear toe consistency while cornering)
 
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