Factory Five Racing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I starting bleeding my rear brakes and almost all my fitting are leaking.
Below are the pictures of my set-up and the flares I made. I have never done brakes before. Please help!

Jon

Auto part Fuel line Plumbing Metal Pipe




Product Metal


Auto part Engine Fictional character Wheel Metal


Automotive lighting Bumper Auto part Automotive exhaust Hand
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How tight did you make them? Use a brake line wrench to tighten if your not using one. You can apply alot more force with them.
Pretty tight. I do not have brake line wrenches but was afraid of stripping threads.
It must be my flares
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
Make sure your flares match your fittings. Single flare vs double flare vs bubble flare. If you mismatch, they won't ever seal.

Don't ask me how I know... :)
 

·
Charter Member
Joined
·
6,164 Posts
buy prefabbed lines and ends from your local auto store. A lot easier and no leaks. Also, but a hand tube bender so you dont kink the tubing.
 

·
Geek
Joined
·
1,402 Posts
The others have already said it, but I think the 2 main things you can do are:
1) Use pre-flared lines from e.g. NAPA or Autozone. These come in standard lengths that you can couple together.
2) Buy or borrow a set of brake line wrenches. You'll need this anyway when you get to bleeding your brakes or else you'll run the risk of stripping the bleeder nuts.
 

·
Unconventional Builder
Joined
·
5,498 Posts
To me this was an area that I thought why spend the time and agg tring to become proficient at flaring just to do it once.
As stated above:
1. Get a set of brake wrenches

2. Use all the FFR lines that already have flares and ends, then buy prefabbed lines with ends from your local auto store. It takes a bit of figuring out what lengths to get but no leaks

3. Use hand tube bender so you dont kink the tubing. You can use 1" socket to form the coils at the M/C and calipers if needed.

Install and done. I also took this approach with the wiring and harnesses. Let the expert do the job once and done.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,252 Posts
Making a good flare is just another one of the skills you'll need to build a car. I'm all about learning new skills. Once you have the tools and the skills, you'll find other uses for them.

Double flares have to be nearly perfect before they'll seal. Start by getting a straight and clean cut on the tubing. I like to use a tubing cutter. But some people say not to use them because they harden the ends.

Once it's cut, clean the ends to remove burrs and junk.

Set the tubing into the jig carefully, and make sure it's not too shallow or too deep. Do the same thing for the second half of the flare. If you crank the handle down too tight, you'll crack the tubing, and then it will leak for sure.

Practice on some spare tubing until you get it right every time.

Oh, and buy some tubing wrenches. They're cheap at Sears, and worth the money you spend on them.
 

·
Plodding Along
Joined
·
2,976 Posts
Just a different bit of advice as everyone above had good suggestions...

Remember, it's just a car... don't let it beat you. Take one line/leak at a time and work it. Whether that means replacing fittings, the line, or cutting and reflaring, keep at it without letting it get the upper hand.

I had a few leaks on my brakes and had to replace one line (the one with a bubble flare at the master). We've all been there and done that, so we know how it feels.

In the end, building a car is like eating an elephant... it's a big job, so take it one bite at a time.
 

·
Junior Charter Member
Joined
·
2,071 Posts
Brake flare fittings

Jon:

Just to chime in. As others have stated, get a set of brake line flare tools to prevent damage to the flare nuts. these look like a box end wrench with a slot in them to allow you to pass the brake line through the wrench end.

If the flare looks good, then tighten the flare nut with a flare wrench a lot tighter than you think they should be. A flare won't seal unless they are TIGHT. You almost can't tighten them too much.

Ron
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,874 Posts
Nobody has asked or mentioned anything about what type of flaring tool you are using. You really need a quality tool to start with or your chances of making a good flare will be greatly diminished.
I do agree with what has already been said though, use preflared where ever possible. Even though I have alot of experience flaring tubing I always use pre done unless there's no way around it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,213 Posts
Teflon tape!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
I detected no attempt at humor in the teflon tape quip. Please let me know you are kidding?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,056 Posts
I just did my brake lines last week also. Relieved to say I only had a few minor leaks and I didn't have to make them "bubba tight".

Don't know which flares you made, but looking at attachment 7 + 11 (the two where you can get a good look at the flare itself)...

Looks like to me that you overdid the second stage of the flare. I did not find that to be helpful at all in getting the flares to seal.

Run the first part of the flare (with the die) all the way down to the vise. Just give the second stage of the flare about 1/2 to 3/4 of a turn after contact.

If you'll look at factory flares I think you'll find they look a lot more like that procedure than attachments 7 + 11 (looks like you ran the tool all the way down to the vise on the second stage).


HTH,

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,267 Posts
WOHA...

do you use copper lines? Well, they have a different wall thickness and probably will not work with your fittings. I think that is the reason for your leaks.

:wrench::wrench::wrench:
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top