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Discussion Starter #21
Front brakes and rotors installed today, and I drilled out and trimmed the rear spindles...nothing earth shattering.

On the other hand, I felt like I was going to shatter the earth trying to hammer the rear wheel studs into the rear hubs. I know the manual says to use a nut and washer to pull them into the hub, but it just felt like I didn't have the dexterity or leverage. After getting just one stud no more than a quarter-inch into the hub after probably 200 hammer hits, I came to this forum for advice because there had to be a better way.

I read EdwardB's 20th Anniversary thread, where he kinda had the same trouble and he used an air impact driver...unfortunately, I don't have one. However, what I was able to do was put the hub in the vise and clamp down on the stronger metal which bolts to the spindle, not the finished part of the hub. I then inserted a screwdriver into one of the stud holes and mounting holes at the same time, which effectively isolated the hub and prevented it from turning. I was then able to use a 24" torque wrench, which is quickly becoming my new best friend, to draw the studs into the hub with a nut and washer. When I got to the last stud, I was able to delicately hold the hub in the vise so it remained isolated and didn't turn. IRS is next...
 

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Looking great so far George, welcome to the fun. Keep posting, your picture quality is very nice and we'll keep watch as you go.

Mike
 

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A couple of recommendations for when you do the rears;
- use a couple more washers,
- get a standard lug nut in 1/2-20 and thread it onto the lug backwards so the flat end is against the washers. The lugnut is longer so there are more threads engaged.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/rnb-611-154/overview/
I always have a few on hand and, if I can't wind the nut off the stud w/ my fingers that one goes in the trash and I start w/ another new one.
- slather everything a/ synthetic wheel bearing grease. If you don't have a grease gun might as well buy one now. You know, so you can report 'what I bought this weekend'. I like to use synthetic grease because we are using plastic bushings in a lot of the suspension and I am comfortable that synthetic won't attack the plastic so I don't have to worry about which type plastic it is.
One more, I don't know if you have an Ace or True Value hardware store handy but my experience is I'd much rather buy nuts bolts etc from them as they generally have more unusual stuff and I think the quality is higher. And then there is the best hardware store on this earth, McMaster-Carr. Find them on the web. An example; I looked up threaded rod. They have 40 varieties. And another 12 similar products.
https://www.mcmaster.com/threaded-rods
Even if you don't buy from them they are a great resource for info. And they ship quickly. Most are 2 days but my record is a little over 23 hours from my order on the website to at my front door.
 

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I'll echo what CraigS says about more washers. I had to replace one of my rear studs. Used three washers, a thin smear of grease between them, a reversed lug nut, and my ratchet with half a jack handle slipped over the end. It was easy peasy.


John
 

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Discussion Starter #25
If you don't have a grease gun might as well buy one now. You know, so you can report 'what I bought this weekend'.
Wow, you must be a mind reader...I actually made not one, not two, but three trips to the big box stores on Sunday. The first was to Home Depot to buy, among other things, a grease gun! The second was to Lowes to buy a 5/8" bit to drill out the rear spindles (thought I had one, but my largest was 1/2") and the third to Lowes again for the nuts and washers to draw the studs into the rear hubs. Luckily HD is less than ten minutes away and Lowes is about five minutes away...and there is an Ace about two minutes away, which I will check out next time.

Thanks for the advice, guys...I should have asked sooner because when I was done, the one washer I was using looked more like a mini-frisbee than a washer.
 
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Look for 'hardened' washers.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
After traveling and attending to life's usual responsibilities for the past two weeks, I was finally able to start the center section and rear suspension. What I bought today: a nice 3-ton jack. Overkill, I know...but with Harbor Freight's leftover black Friday sale, it was cheaper than comparable 1.5 or 2 ton jacks. After assembling the IRS lower control and toe adjustment arms, I had a nice bowl of Wheaties for breakfast and tackled the center section.

First things first: chasing the front mounting holes with a 5/8" drill bit is a royal pain...it seemed like I couldn't get anywhere for more than a half second without the bit catching and twisting either the drill, my wrist, or the center section. So I first used a 1/2" bit and rounded the holes' edges by pivoting the bit clockwise and counterclockwise while the drill bit was spinning. I'm sure there is a technical term for this, which you'd think I know with all of the home construction I've done., but I don't. Then, using the 5/8" bit, I sprayed some lithium grease in the hole and and put the drill in reverse. By using it in reverse with the aid of the lithium grease, I was able to put all my weight on the drill without the bit binding or catching, and the hole gradually widened to 5/8". Each hole took me about five minutes with a few applications of grease. Once I was all the way through, I used the 5/8" bit to round the holes in that clockwise/counterclockwise pivoting motion to give me just the slightest bit more wiggle room for the bolts.

My 75-year old dad and I then started the center section, which felt like a giant boulder after a little while. After first unsuccessfully trying to install the center section like the manual shows, we tried something different. First, we placed the mid-portion of the center section on the jack and used a skateboard from my youth to support the nose/pinion housing or whatever the smaller round section is called that attaches to the driveshaft. This basically enabled us to have the center section off the ground, with the jack and skateboard acting like a big dolly. We pushed the jack/skateboard/center section under the chassis as forward as we could, and I picked up the nose/pinion housing and rested it on a chassis crossmember. My dad then jacked up the center section while I kept it steady, gradually moving it forward and allowing the chassis and jack to support the center section's weight. In almost no time at all, I was able to line up the rear bolts and then the front by ever so slightly raising or lowering the jack.

All in all, and once I figured out the best way to do it, the center section wasn't as difficult as I thought it would be. Looking forward to the remainder of the IRS sections now that the giant bolder is installed...

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Looking great!
 
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I recently bought the Pittsburgh low clearance jack. Very nice compared to my old HF floor jack that still works after 20 years or so...

Nice work getting the center section up and mounted, looking at other builds, that always seems to be a challenge.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Man, 29 days since my last post...more traveling and the usual holiday madness made it tough to get in the garage in December. But luckily, I didn't have to buy anything this weekend! After getting the center section in just less than a month ago, I was able to install the IRS and brakes without any problems. The IRS actually isn't very difficult at all, just a little bit more work with the upper control arms, lowers, tie-rods, CV axles, etc. I used some webbing to hold the CV axles horizontal, which made it easier to install them into the knuckles and hubs since I usually work alone.

The 13" rear brakes were pretty straight forward as well, but each caliper bracket is a series of a five or six plates that join together to make a bracket assembly. I found it easier to simply look at the photo in the instruction manual to assemble the plate system, versus trying to read the directions, especially since the right side was a mirror of the left.

One question for those who have installed these brakes: the instruction manual makes no mention of installing chatter clips in the same manner as the front brakes. The clips are included with the pads, but there is nothing in the manual about their installation. Any idea/reason/opinion why the clips are omitted?

Thanks,
George
 

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Discussion Starter #31
E-brake cables installed this weekend, as well as the brackets for the rear brake flex lines and the flex lines themselves. I'm pretty certain FFR mixed up the packaging of the banjo bolts that go on the standard front brakes and the rear 13" brakes. The front brakes use a finer thread pattern, while the rears are more of a course thread. Unless I repacked everything wrong after inventory, the finer thread banjo bolts were packed with the rear brakes and the courser thread bolts were with the fronts. Pedal box next...
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Pedal box assembled. Since I'm at that point where things are going to start being installed in the engine compartment, and because I want those visible panels to be powder coated just like the F-panels, I decided to cleco, fit, prep, and drill all engine compartment panels. They will be going to the powder coat guy tomorrow, and once everything comes back I can start the master cylinders.
 

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Thanks for starting a build thread, I am one of those who will read through this (as i have many others) and convince myself that it is something I can and should do (alright the should part doesn't take much convincing). Keep up the good work!
 

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Discussion Starter #34
So it's been quite a while since I last posted some updates on here, but I've still been at the build just about every weekend. Instead of trying to catch up all at once, I'll break this up into a few posts.

After installing the E-brake cables, I added the E-brake roller mod that I've seen on this forum. Special thanks for Paul B. for posting the part number from McMaster and to Eugene for recommending this mod before installing the cockpit aluminum.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I then installed the steering rack, and this is where I ran into the first major hurdle/mistake since I've started. It turns out I installed the steering arms backwards, even though their orientation seemed correct visually. For those who may read this thread before getting to this point in the build, the end section of each steering arm with the larger holes must face down and the smaller holes face up. Unfortunately for me, I had this backwards...so off came the brakes, axle nut, hubs, and spindles just so I could get to the steering arms and reverse them. The steering shaft came next and went in without any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I chose not to purchase the Wilwood brakes because I instead planned on using some sort of power assisted braking method. After some research and reading the posts of many on here, I chose Mike Forte's hydroboost setup. For those who aren't aware, you send him your pedal box and bracket assembly for modification and he sends it back to you with the hydroboost installed. Here are a few pics of the hydroboost assembly attached to the pedal box, and one photo of it on its own.
 

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Here's where I ran into the second hurdle of the build. When I installed the hydroboost on to the firewall plate, there was simply no way I could orient the assembly without its accumulator hitting the steering shaft. I wrestled with it for I can't tell you how long, even attempting to install it upside down (without success because it was now hitting the chassis elsewhere) or re-drilling holes in the firewall plate.

I called Mike Forte and he picked up my call, even on a Saturday morning. I briefly described the problem I was having and we agreed that I should email him photos and we would talk again on Monday. I started to do a little online research at this point and viewed some photos of the hydroboost installed on other roadsters. Sure enough, the yellow and green caps on top of the hydroboost assembly almost were in a 2 o'clock position on those builds, but mine were pointed pretty much straight up at 12 o'clock for whatever reason.

At this point, I knew something was off with the assembly's orientation in relation to the silver bracket which affixes the assembly to the firewall plate. If there was some way I could rotate the assembly without moving the silver bracket, I was sure that the accumulator would then clear the steering shaft. The problem was that the assembly was affixed to the silver bracket by a large squared off nut on the assembly's threaded portion that fits through the bracket. You can see it in my second photo and I did not have a socket large enough or anywhere deep enough to loosen the nut.

After speaking with Mike on Monday, I explained my thoughts to him. He graciously agreed to ship me the socket he uses to assemble everything. Within a few days, I received the socket which was about 2" round by 7" long. I fit this on to a large ratchet and was able to loosen the bolt. I thought at that point all I had to do was rotate the assembly in relation to the silver bracket, but no such luck. The silver bracket has a small tab viewed in the third photo which sits inside the drilled notch of the assembly viewed in the fourth photo.

In order to get everything oriented correctly, I had to file the silver bracket's tab so that it rotated about 1/8 of a turn in relation to the assembly. I'm pretty certain that the assembly's notch was drilled incorrectly, but who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Once I was able to get the hydroboost assembly rotated correctly, I tightened down the squared off nut and applied some Loctite because I had filed off the silver bracket's tab. Once I did that, everything went perfectly. The first photo shows it installed, and the second photo shows how much the assembly needed to be rotated. The little Sharpie marker mark on the silver bracket was first immediately in line with the black ear tab on the assembly...you can now see that it is about a 1/2" rotated and there is plenty of clearance between the accumulator and steering shaft. The photo makes it look much closer than it really is.

Btw, in the first photo you can also see the start of Mike Forte's hydraulic clutch installation. He was such a gentleman through this process that I decided to throw more money at him :)
 

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Lastly, I installed Russ Thompson's drop trunk this weekend. It comes in five separate metal pieces: four sides and the bottom pan, all of which rivet together. Russ pre marks each corner of the bottom pan and all four sides are marked as well...so you line up A with A, B with B, etc. It's pretty much idiot proof, and he even lays out the approximate locations of the crossmember cutouts. It came with super helpful instructions and informative photos, and I very much recommend this mod for all of the reasons people have said on here.
 

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You're not the first (or I'm sure last...) to get the steering arms on wrong. Glad you got that sorted out. I'm a little surprised to see the hydraulic clutch MC on the firewall versus in the location designed for it on the pedal box. With no modifications. Interesting. One hint though. In your sig line you mention using a Coyote eventually. If so, you won't be using that clutch switch. The Coyote control pack comes with a switch and harness connection that is installed on the top. So that it's pressed with the clutch is pushed all the way down.
 
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