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I’ve been lurking over in The Garage Journal forum and I’ve read so many posts till my head is spinning

I’ve got a fresh 30x50 slab that I’m building my shop on and I know i want to coat the floor.

Epoxy or polyurea is what I’m thinking.

Who’s used what and would you recommend it again.

1500 sqft is a pretty substantial areas to cover so I know the cost will be high. My brother and I plan on doing this ourselves.

Thanks
 

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Check out rustoleum rock solid metallic.
 

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Epoxy vs Polyurea and proper preparation - my head was spinning too.

I was not going to do it myself. I found Garage Experts that puts down what they call a 'wicking' epoxy first then the poly on top of that. The best of both worlds from what I've read. In one way I was sorta lucky as the first coat of poly set up quickly and there were some lines in the finish so they came back and abraded it down a bit and put on a second coat of poly.

You can buy their products on line too. They wouldn't tell you that but I did some researching and found the products they use. I'd have to do some searching in my files but still have it somewhere.

And you have probably also read that even though new concrete it still should be ground/roughen up with what looks like a floor sanding machine, round in shape. Check out renting one. One guy worked the field while the other worked the corners and edges.

Watch videos of how it's all done and get some good equipment like the spiked soles for your shoes so you can walk around on the epoxy when spreading the color chips allowing the epoxy to heal before it sets up.

George
 

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Epoxy vs Polyurea and proper preparation - my head was spinning too.

I was not going to do it myself. I found Garage Experts that puts down what they call a 'wicking' epoxy first then the poly on top of that. The best of both worlds from what I've read. In one way I was sorta lucky as the first coat of poly set up quickly and there were some lines in the finish so they came back and abraded it down a bit and put on a second coat of poly.

You can buy their products on line too. They wouldn't tell you that but I did some researching and found the products they use. I'd have to do some searching in my files but still have it somewhere.

And you have probably also read that even though new concrete it still should be ground/roughen up with what looks like a floor sanding machine, round in shape. Check out renting one. One guy worked the field while the other worked the corners and edges.

Watch videos of how it's all done and get some good equipment like the spiked soles for your shoes so you can walk around on the epoxy when spreading the color chips allowing the epoxy to heal before it sets up.

George
I'm starting the same covering on my garage this week (2,700 sq.ft.). However, I'm going with a local non-national franchise company, the same company that painted the garage. The same material, same MSDS, same thickness, same chips, the same prep, for $4/sq.ft. installed. That's about half of what the local Garage specialty guy quoted.
 

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I got an epoxy coating on my garage floor - picked up the stuff from Home Depot. Think it was either Behr or Rustoleum. I had my garage contractor put it on instead of a commercial outfit - cost was less than 1/2 of the commercial outfit quote. It's held up extremely well for 5 1/2 years. Only minor complaint is that it can be slippery if fluids are spilled on it. Other than that, thumbs up!!

I decided against chips for the simple reason that if I drop a bolt or whatever, it would be much more difficult to find!!
 

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Keep in mind what George mentioned. A moisture resistant epoxy primer will help to keep the coating from lifting if you have any moisture issues below the slab. Also, the slab will need to have cured for 28 days before you start an application if you don't use one of those epoxy primers. Doing what we call "broadcasting to refusal" with clean 30 mesh sand on the first coat of whatever material you use for the finish, sweeping and vacuuming the next day, and applying a second coat using a white rubber multi blade window squeegee on a broom handle. Using the squeegee allows you to pull the epoxy over the sand finish thin enough that when you back roll it you leave a textured finish that will help avoid slip issues. There are a number of epoxy manufacturers that only produce materials for floors, and your material cost purchasing directly from them will be quite a bit less expensive. I've been doing epoxy floor coatings for the past 40 years in the commercial construction market. I've done some garages for friends, but mostly avoid residential.
 

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Absolutely, positively, don't use the cheap 2-part stuff from Home Depot. It's allegedly a huge step-up from a single-can garage floor paint, but I had terrible results. I think it was from Rustoleum.

I am positive i prepared the surface properly. I waited an entire week to walk or park a car on it. It looked like crap in just a few weeks. This winter I plan to have a professional sand the whole thing and apply something like U-coat it.
 

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I have used the Rustoleum product twice. Once many years ago I did my garage in a plain gray just prior to starting my first build. I did my new garage about a year ago with a light green and chips, I also added the anti slip powder because I remember the first garage being VERY slick when wet. It took three of the kits each time to cover about 500 sq ft. Both times the product worked great. My new workshop is also 1500 sq ft, a bit more than I can do by myself so I will probably find someone to do it.
 

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I chose Armor Garage epoxy with the industrial topcoat with the no-skid surface and I've really been happy with it. I did all the prep myself including the diamond brush abrading. I do notice small nicks in the top coat when I have something that drags on the floor but it hasn't gone to the base coat and never to the concrete.

I did drop part of my Bridgeport mill on it while restoring it and it took a chunk of the floor out but the concrete is what broke.... the epoxy was still fully bonded to the chunk
 

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Just as an alternative option, have you looked at staining it and then coating with a clear that you can maintain over the years? There are some neat examples on Pinterest.
 

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Por15 concrete floor armor. I had the rust oleum from Lowe’s and it was ok but didn’t hold up very good so I rented a floor sander and removed it and put the Por 15 on it. It’s holding up way better and it comes with grit so it isn’t slippery.
 

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Went w Tailored Living / Premier Garage, epoxy w chips, the ones I chose were light gray and white, I easily find dropped clips or washers etc. A lot of people just choose the black and dark gray chips that look good on a brochure. I wanted a light garage, and this bright colored floor finish significantly helps light up the underside of the car, much less need to bring a shop light for every little job or check. The chips create a very subtle texture so doesn't get dangerously slippery from fluids. Super easy to clean of oil stains, they just swipe right off with a baby wipe.

The installers used a grinder to get the concrete ready for the primer to stick, then they seal any microcracks, paint, add chips, then epoxy clear coat on top. And the final positive is that even the wife is positive about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I’m going to make some calls to some of the garage floor coating sales places to discuss my options.

My concrete is new poured about 3 months ago and had never had anything on it so I’m hoping for a etch and coat.

Thanks for the input and I’ll let you know which way I go.
 

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I paid a company for the poly spartic. Haven't even taken a chunk out of it yet. Looks great, very durable. make sure you go up the mud sill too. Makes it pop!
 

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Go to Home Depot or lowes nearest your location. The floor is polished. Lasts forever. One can weld on it and not burn or melt. Spills wipe up no problem
 

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Four years ago, I used the Rustoleum solvent-based epoxy (not the water-based) with their clear coat on top. It looked great, for about two months. Now it is horribly stained, and looks awful. I have tried everything to clean it, but nothing touches it. I cannot imagine a worse result. If I had it to do over, I would seal the concrete and leave it at that.
 

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I’ve been lurking over in The Garage Journal forum and I’ve read so many posts till my head is spinning

I’ve got a fresh 30x50 slab that I’m building my shop on and I know i want to coat the floor.

Epoxy or polyurea is what I’m thinking.

Who’s used what and would you recommend it again.

1500 sqft is a pretty substantial areas to cover so I know the cost will be high. My brother and I plan on doing this ourselves.

Thanks
Do not 'coat' the concrete. It won't last. Get the concrete polished by a professional concrete polishing company that specializes in polished concrete. It's nearly indestrucible, looks great, low/no maintainenance of the surface, and it's harder than the back of your head! Go to a nearby Costco...most have polished concrete floors.
 

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I just redid my entire shop. I had painted the floor with the epoxy paint about 15 years ago. It really didnt come up but just wore out. It took a ton of abuse.

I rented a sander, degreased, etched, and put down 3 coats of epoxy and two coats of clear from Sherwin Williams. Came out very nice. I went without paint chips. It has only been down for a few months but seems to be doing ok. I think prep is key, and being patient about letting it cure.

I like the polished concrete idea!!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The polished look is nice but I’m trying to hide some ugly concrete work. So epoxy or polyurea is what I’ll need to do

That’s concrete story is a long one.
 

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https://www.garagecoatings.com
I had mine done w/ the flake. Really nice but if you drop a small nut, etc. you have to get the broom because you can't see it/find it -- it's camouflaged. I probably should have done solid color in my garage, flake in my wife's. Also, be sure to add something to the last coat to give you some traction. The glossier it is, the slicker it is, and the more you fall down.
When they did mine, they rolled and rolled the second coat, then put down at least twice the flake needed. After it dried, they swept it up and recycled it. Then they hit it with a BIG leaf blower right before the clear coats.
 
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