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I agree, it does look interesting. I learned the hard way to use nothing but distilled water when filling cooling systems after rebuilds and so on, especially when the local tap water is very hard. Even so-called "distilled" water from the grocery store has caused problems for me. The ability to do without water completely would be a big deal.

And being able to operate at higher temps safely is horsepower in the bank, so to speak.

I don't see a downside here. Now, all I need is corroborating evidence. :)


Lynn B.
 

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I didn't look at the link, but I have seen these plenty of times before. The drawback is usually the price.
 

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You have to remove virtually all traces of water or water based coolant throughout the cooling system before installing the Evans stuff. If, after you've installed it, you measure more than 3% water/water based coolant, you have to remove the contaminated Evans and install a NEW batch.:sad:
Water, it seems, is a contaminant. :eek:
 

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That stuff sounds great!!
But to have less than 3% water remaining would be a challenge.
Now to convince the race track that says water only:confused:
I guess that will rule out me using it in the race car.

Mark
 

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I have used the Evans coolant.

Yes, expensive.

Biggest problem is the very low surface tension of the product.

1) You will have to plug the water pump weep hole. If you do not it will run out past the water pump seal.
2) Any gasket that is not silicon will weep coolant.

It is very difficult to keep this product from weeping out of paper, cork, and other gasket materials etc.

I hate leaks.
 

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i have used it in a 99 7.3 diesel truck for 60k+ miles, no problems. have also run it in my jbl, no problems. no weeping, leaks, etc.

everything has an application.
 

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If you are experiencing a marginal issue with cooling and need to lower the temperature just a few degrees, simply add Water Wetter, or a few drops of DISH SOAP to your coolant/water in your cooling system. The principles are EXACTLY the same in all instances...lowering the surface tension of the water, thereby facilitating a better interface between the hot metal surfaces, and the coolant. ;)

On a side note, other than the issue with the header tank not being in the right place per the FFR design, I have never seen a GTM not cool properly with the stock cooling system and regular coolant. Sooooo, I guess my question would be...WHY? As far as going to expensive, exotic coolants?

BTW- I do believe that all modern diesel engine manufacturers have a specific coolant that they REQUIRE you to use in order to maintain warrantee coverage. Again, I don't see the logic in going to something else.
 

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I am not a expert on this but I have read something about distilled water will have the best transfer of heat, it's all about the heat transfer. The problem with only distilled water is it will loose it's ph and end up rotting your motor. If that was watched it would be fine.

Antifreeze will lower the boiling point and raise the freeze point, and also offer lubricant, and a balanced ph. You still have to watch the ph in antifreeze or it will also turn bad, and start to rot your aluminum.

Running at higher temps will give you better gas milage, but less horse power.

Haveing a higher preasure water system will lower the boiling point.

Nascar runs a very high presure cooling system because they have the nose sealed up for down force. They run at 230, 240 degres, way above boiling.

Anyway I don't see a need for the product. If any car I drive operates at or above 190, 200 degrees then I need a better system. I'm looking at 180ish for a running temp.

agree disagree? I'm learning too. I bet every car forum has dicussed this topic.
 

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The general rule is that 220 is the optimum operating temperature. Above and detonation is an issue, and below about 180 and incomplete burn is an issue. In general the sweet spot is about 210. I have always run the 30psi cooling systems in my race cars and it does help, but because of some interesting physics, anything above this pressure does little to increase performance of the water based cooling system.
 

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The general rule is that 220 is the optimum operating temperature. Above and detonation is an issue, and below about 180 and incomplete burn is an issue. In general the sweet spot is about 210.
Really? I sold a SRT Charger to get my kit. All the guys on the forum, the first mod they did was to take out the 190 thermostat and put in a 180 to help increase horsepower. They said the only reason the factory put in the higher was to try and get better milage. If I remember, this was also proven on the dino.

So if the object is to keep the intake air temp, the feul as cold as possible, I get that.

220 seems pretty high, could you explain why running so high is optimum. Street cars run around 200 or less. Why if they perform better at higher temps why aren't the factory built cars made to run at the 220 range.
 

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They probably also went to a "power pulley". :001_rolleyes:

It's just a "general rule" and it depends upon where you are taking the reading greatly. The important thing is cylinder or combustion chamber temperature. Oil temp has ALOT to do with it too and most street cars have no oil cooler, so they must run the water cooler than optimum to make up for it. It isn't the best for HP, but it makes the engine last a whole lot longer. I can tell you that Mendeola, with their race transaxles, also advised us that they want to see temps in the 210 range. This is no problem for us in the new car as there is a system equalizer that will keep engine oil, engine water, and trans fluid temps all at around 200-220. You can actually build quite a bit more power by running the oil much hotter. I have run it as high as 370 or so in a track record breaking qualifying engine. The key, and this is a bit of a secret I am giving away here, was extremely cold water and very hot oil. We used some pretty interesting techniques to acheive this, which I won't go into, but basically the sanctioning body outlawed the one system I was using, so I came back the next race determined to break the track record. It was an 8 year old record that everybody said could not be broken. We did it the first lap of qualifying, then backed it up with an even faster second lap! They tore the car down to nothing including the rear axle, transmission, engine, EVERYTHING. The only thing they found was that there were two different stampings on the intermediate plates on the carb that they said, going forward, would have to match. They went as far as to measure all the orifices of the carb to make sure they were within factory spec. :001_rolleyes:

Man I miss those days...:)

Anyway, point is, it's just a general rule, and, as you say, the dyno is the only way to really know what is right in a particular instance.
 

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If you are experiencing a marginal issue with cooling and need to lower the temperature just a few degrees, simply add Water Wetter, or a few drops of DISH SOAP to your coolant/water in your cooling system. The principles are EXACTLY the same in all instances...lowering the surface tension of the water, thereby facilitating a better interface between the hot metal surfaces, and the coolant. ;)

On a side note, other than the issue with the header tank not being in the right place per the FFR design, I have never seen a GTM not cool properly with the stock cooling system and regular coolant. Sooooo, I guess my question would be...WHY? As far as going to expensive, exotic coolants?

BTW- I do believe that all modern diesel engine manufacturers have a specific coolant that they REQUIRE you to use in order to maintain warrantee coverage. Again, I don't see the logic in going to something else.
ford was having problems with the international engines and pin holes caused by corrosion, hence the need to add a coolant additive. the evans beats both these problems. i also added a 210 deg thermostat, heat is what makes diesels roll. so no more coolant additive or having to test for silicates which are what are used to coat the surfaces and act as as a sacrificial metal. if anybody ever puts a filter on their cooling system they will be amazed at the crap that comes out.

the max temp for coolant goes out the window if water is not used. and the soap thing is a mess if used as a surfunctant, i have done this and and the soap congeals at the water neck opening and other places probably hidden, it doesn't stay suspended, or whatever i used didn't.

hoerr racing also used the evans in their trans am car when i talked to them about 10 years ago.

i have seen my coolant (not water anymore) reach 220+ (maybe 230) on track, no problems. the system is not pressurized so nothing is under stress either.

everything has an application.
 

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Distilled water is used because the minerals have been removed. Not so important in a iron block. The new aluminum blocks are different, much more susceptible to electrolysis issues. If you ever have taken a aluminum block apart that hasn't run distilled water it will be noticeable, much more corrosion.
When water in under pressure the boiling point is increased for free.
Heat kills engines. If I'm not mistaken the PCM will shut the engine off around 250 . So whats the point? I do use Water Wet and it does reduce engine temperatures by 5 to 7 degrees. I'm good with that.

Marry Christmas to all, Ron QRP
 
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