Factory Five Racing Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It looks as though I'm fairly committed to using the donor tank at this point, but the question I'm constantly asked by visitors to my humble garage is; "Is that safe?" And then I hear some mumbling about Pintos and exploding gas tanks.

For me the biggest reason for not going with a fuel-safe is the money. (same decision Fords executives made in the 70's). I noticed some cheaper ones in Jegs or Summit though.

Has anybody researched this regarding the roadster set-up? Maybe the tank design for the Mustangs is inherently safer these days?

Jerry
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
29,537 Posts
The FFR frame is designed so that if you're rear ended, the tank drops down. Hopefully, it won't split open and ignite.

The fuel cell is foam filled. In the event it's damaged, fuel can only drip out versus gushing out of a fuel tank
 

·
MKIII
Joined
·
373 Posts
I have a fuel cell from summit in mine. Biggest reason was more fuel capacity, so i can go further then around the corner with my motor and 16gallons. this one is 22 gallons, foam with two bulkhead fittings.
 

·
FFCobra Craftsman
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
The fuel cell is also a rubber bladder in an aluminum case. In the event or a rear ender, the bladder will just take on a new shape rather than split and leak. It's much safer.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,303 Posts
i dont recall the fuel tank being a special problem in mustang crashes. the FFR exposes you to lots more risk in other areas that i suspect the fuel tank is a much small contributor to overall risk than it was in the mustang.

you might examine all the street and track crashes that are available on the web and look at types of injuries. i cant recall any that involve failure of the tank. (but that doesnt mean there arent any)

james
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,135 Posts
Yes, a fuel cell is always going to be safer than a stock tank. And you're always safer wearing a helmet and full fire suite. And you're going to be inherently safer if you never leave the garage.

Out of all the cars on the road - all cobra replicas and all Mustangs - when was the last time you heard of a safety issue regarding the fuel tank?
 

·
Lay posi
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
My father's been riding my rear about this since I started building. I keep reminding him that the complaint is coming from a guy who rides a Harley with the gas right by the family jewels. There is always more you can do for safety if you have the funds. Things you can do to minimize the risk:

1) Do not put the battery in a metal box infront of the tank. This puts the ignition source right next to the fuel. Thank you Breeze for the engine bay battery mount. FFR's plastic box in the trunk is also not a bad solution.

2) Use a fuel cell. Proven safety.

3) replace the rear cockpit aluminum with steel. It would be a pain and add extra weight to the car. Plus it might not even make the car safer, a few crash tests would be needed to confirm. Where does the gas tank really go in a rearend collision? We all hope that is doesn't go through the rear cockpit wall.

4) Use highback seats, or a rollbar pad, or wear a helmet. If a gas tank explosion is a concern then the roll bar wacking your head due to a rearend collision should also be a concern.

The nice thing is that with these cars we all get to pick the level of safety we want. I'm doing 1 and 4. Some will say that 2 is not an option and others will say that its overkill.

Wibby
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,698 Posts
The drop in tank design of the Pinto was a carry over from the early 60's and was used on all Falcons, Mustangs, etc of that era. IMO, allot of the hysteria about exploding Pintos was just that, hysteria. I don't believe that they were more likely to explode than any other car of the time. The Fox type Mustang is a completely different chassis than the earlier cars, and uses a different type tank mounting.

If you decide to use a fuel cell, don't use the cheap plastic ones available from some of the aftermarket. Todays fuel will leach out the chemicals in the plastic, and make them brittle, rendering them much more dangerous than a stock tank. If you pay the bucks for a good aluminum shell with a rubber bladder, it will also need to be inspected on a recurring basis to insure it hasn't turned brittle. Normally, they need to be returned to the factory to be re certified.
 

·
FFCobra Craftsman
Joined
·
6,103 Posts
This is something I have debated and looked into. Not all 'fuel cells' are the same. It is just a general term, many are simply generic gas tanks - no foam, no rubber bladder, no safety rating. Even then, foam and bladder needs to be periodically replaced to maintain certification - now, I do not know if you are not worried about track certification, will not replacing them cause any problems (leaks or foam deteriorating and clogging fuel filter.

Personally, I am looking for something that is safer (not necessarily racing safe, but better than stock) and with maybe a bit more capacity.
 

·
FFCobra Fanatic
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
If you get hit in the rear hard enough to destroy the tank, the roll bar will have pounded a 2" groove in the back of your head and you won't feel a thing.
 

·
FFCobra Craftsman
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
I went with the Fuel Safe fuel cell for a bolt in 22 gallon gas tank. The fact that it is safer than the standard Mustang tank was just an added bonus.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top