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I'm getting ready to run the fuel lines. I'm running the 4.6 . Was wondering which fuel lines I should go with or return line system for fuel injection. I was thinking on either using fuel line that came with kit or buying the braided fuel line from sumit. I saw a video of a guy who had a fuel line come loose and his car burned down to the ground so I want to go the safest way. But I like the look of the braid fuel lines. It's high pressure efi so need some advise
 

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The only cost effective reliable fuel line is tubular steel, connected with the proper fittings. If you were planning on using steel braid, be aware it has a service life of about 6 years or as short as 1 year before the rubber inner liner is compromised and it must be replaced. Teflon lined steel braid is expensive but will last almost for ever. It requires different style hose ends than the rubber lined steel braid.
What ever you do, do not attempt to secure a rubber line to a steel line with a hose clamp in a high pressure fuel system.
 

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Robert,

Do not use the standard stainless flexible fuel lines. Ethanol will eventually eat up those lines and begin leaking. You should use solid lines as much as you can and then put in flexible lines with a Teflon lining to the engine and some in the rear. You can still find some nice looking Teflon lines with the braided stainless covering.

Read this January 2011 Hot Rod article on fuel lines.
Performance Fuel Hoses - Hot Rod Magazine

George

Added edit: As John mentioned above, you can use some good AN fittings on the Teflon lines that will withstand the higher pressures of your EFI system.
 

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It's all about pump gas being a lot more corrosive these days. The quick summary of the Hot Rod article is that A/N braided line was designed for aircraft use with aviation gas. We don't have that at the pump, we largely use gasahol with about 50 different additives. It's become so corrosive - even after the upgrade to handle alcohol years back - that the SAE had to come up with a new fuel line standard, which uses a lot more teflon in the inner lining. It doesn't look any different, just all black rubber, but you see the difference in the price.

That is something that has happened across the board - the small aviation builders dealt with it about 5 years ago, there's a lot of posts on it. Planes cannot tolerate fuel lines leaking, hoses coming apart, or rubber deteriorating and clogging filters and carbs. They tend to fall out of the air when that happens. Hence, they treat it with a degree of concern.

Not to mention the small engine crowd, most of the L&G and chain saw vendors are having major comeback issues. I used to blame the cheap carbs with primer bulbs for being the issue, but when your 14 year old German made Stihl starts blowing fuel on your throttle hand from a swelled suction line getting loose, you get a hint.

It's the gasoline. And it's not going to get any better. Don't use A/N automotive hose (which isn't aircraft spec anyway,) and don't use the old fuel hose at all. Steel lines, teflon flexible is the modern standard. It's not a high dollar look, but having fuel issues on top of the expense seems really counterproductive.

If you can run low profile Gatorbacks on a '33, with an independent front suspension, you can run Kevlar braided teflon fuel line. And should be. The knowledgeable will recognize you know something, the newbs will scratch their head and wonder what that HSLD stuff is and why you did. It's not about stainless braided any more - aircraft wasn't in the day, it rusted like mad. It's about why the spec is there to begin with, and the spec has changed to reflect the harsher service conditions.
 
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