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Discussion Starter #61
There isn't a problem moving it to the inside. I always recommend the inside, that's how it is on my car. It is a little inconvenient tightening the setscrew, but it's worth being able to remove the shaft.
what's the benefit of putting the flange bearing on the cockpit side of the firewall? don't you still need a socket inside the engine bay to remove the nut?
 

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Is there a set screw on the flange bearing? i just thought there were 2 on the pillow bearing. I guess i'll need to look closer.
Yes, 2 of them.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #63
soft shocks

I recently read in someone else's build thread that it's recommended to set the shocks to their softest setting. Should I be removing my front shocks in order to do so? I've already gotten the spindles and hubs attached and torqued down.
 

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I recently read in someone else's build thread that it's recommended to set the shocks to their softest setting. Should I be removing my front shocks in order to do so? I've already gotten the spindles and hubs attached and torqued down.
I always recommend checking the setting before assembling the springs and shocks. They are SUPPOSED to come from the manufacturer on the lowest rebound setting however I have found several that came out of the box with a different setting. Generally when using the factory 500# front and 350# rear springs the lowest rebound works well. Heavier springs require going up.

You mention already having spindles attached and torqued---that won't keep you from being able to remove the coilover assembly. It would be a good idea to go ahead and take them out and check their settings...just in case.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #68
I recently read in someone else's build thread that it's recommended to set the shocks to their softest setting. Should I be removing my front shocks in order to do so? I've already gotten the spindles and hubs attached and torqued down.
I always recommend checking the setting before assembling the springs and shocks. They are SUPPOSED to come from the manufacturer on the lowest rebound setting however I have found several that came out of the box with a different setting. Generally when using the factory 500# front and 350# rear springs the lowest rebound works well. Heavier springs require going up.

You mention already having spindles attached and torqued---that won't keep you from being able to remove the coilover assembly. It would be a good idea to go ahead and take them out and check their settings...just in case.

Jeff
Thanks for the advice. Shocks removed and checked. They were indeed at the softest setting already. How tight should I wind the spring collar? Hand tight? I did hand tight and then maybe and extra quarter turn by sticking a screwdriver into one of the side holes for leverage
 

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Discussion Starter #69
"One step forward. Two steps back"- Paula Abdul

Removed the front shocks to check the settings. They were already at the softest setting. I put the flange bearing on the inside of the cockpit and also adjusted my steering rack adapter as the wheel was turning more to one side than the other. You can see the red line I marked on the rack and adapter and see that the adapter was rotated once tooth counter clockwise. I tried installing the tie rods tonight. I made sure my steering rack was centered and lined up my rotors. I even measured the distances between the fronts and backs of the rotors to ensure they were both straight. After I tightened the bolts, one rotor was visibly rotated out about 10 degrees. I had to then use a tie rod tool to separate the rod from the spindle, which led to the grease boots getting chewed up with holes. Gotta get new boots now. Any recs on how to better get rough alignment of the front steering?
 

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How tight should I wind the spring collar? Hand tight? I did hand tight and then maybe and extra quarter turn by sticking a screwdriver into one of the side holes for leverage
For the initial setting, make sure the spring is seated in the hat (should have an added tie wrap to make sure it stays there, per the instructions) and tighten the adjustment to where it's just touching the spring. Not loose, but also not compressing the spring. Do this on all four and use as the starting point for later when you set ride height.

...I had to then use a tie rod tool to separate the rod from the spindle, which led to the grease boots getting chewed up with holes. Gotta get new boots now. Any recs on how to better get rough alignment of the front steering?
Several comments. Those pickle forks will almost always mess something up. Useful for tear down and replacement, not so much for a new build. I'd put it in your tool box and leave it there. I know it's hindsight, but wouldn't tighten those tie rod nuts down until you have the rough location established. Once they're wedged in, can be hard to get back out as you found. But even then, you don't have to remove the tie rods to adjust them. Loosen the jam nut, and turn the inner tie rod. That's how they're adjusted during an alignment. You will need to remove the clamp on the small end of the boot so the inner tie turns in the boot. You don't want the boot twisting. But it's a simple and very common process. For new rubber boots, if those are ruined, I'd suggest upgrading to 9.13101G Energy Suspension poly boots. Widely available and not expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #71
How tight should I wind the spring collar? Hand tight? I did hand tight and then maybe and extra quarter turn by sticking a screwdriver into one of the side holes for leverage
For the initial setting, make sure the spring is seated in the hat (should have an added tie wrap to make sure it stays there, per the instructions) and tighten the adjustment to where it's just touching the spring. Not loose, but also not compressing the spring. Do this on all four and use as the starting point for later when you set ride height.

...I had to then use a tie rod tool to separate the rod from the spindle, which led to the grease boots getting chewed up with holes. Gotta get new boots now. Any recs on how to better get rough alignment of the front steering?
Several comments. Those pickle forks will almost always mess something up. Useful for tear down and replacement, not so much for a new build. I'd put it in your tool box and leave it there. I know it's hindsight, but wouldn't tighten those tie rod nuts down until you have the rough location established. Once they're wedged in, can be hard to get back out as you found. But even then, you don't have to remove the tie rods to adjust them. Loosen the jam nut, and turn the inner tie rod. That's how they're adjusted during an alignment. You will need to remove the clamp on the small end of the boot so the inner tie turns in the boot. You don't want the boot twisting. But it's a simple and very common process. For new rubber boots, if those are ruined, I'd suggest upgrading to 9.13101G Energy Suspension poly boots. Widely available and not expensive.
Thanks for the great advice again.
 

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"One step forward. Two steps back"- Paula Abdul
You're doing great by correcting what you see is wrong, WHEN you see it. I know this dance very well. It'll happen frequently, so with the correct mindset you won't be bothered with it.

BTW, I call my car "Pete" because I've had to REPEAT everything during the build at least twice. :grin2:
 

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"One step forward. Two steps back"- Paula Abdul
You're doing great by correcting what you see is wrong, WHEN you see it. I know this dance very well. It'll happen frequently, so with the correct mindset you won't be bothered with it.

BTW, I call my car "Pete" because I've had to REPEAT everything during the build at least twice. /forums/images/FFCars_2016/smilies/tango_face_grin.png
Lol. I should call my finished basement Threte then. Ha
 

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As EdwardB said, only use a pickle fork on a part that is going in the trash.

If you need to take a ball joint or tie rod end out here is an easy way. Loosen the nut all the way to the end of the threads. Then hit the part that has the hole with the hammer. In this case, you would hit the spindle arm. The tie rod will pop right out in just a couple hits. I have popped them out in one hit. If you have access, it works even better to use two hammers from opposite sides.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
Ordered new boots per Edwardb's suggestion. I don't have rear end yet. Any recs on what to work on next? Cockpit panels? Pedal box?
 

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Discussion Starter #76
upper steering shaft clearance

when turning my steering shaft to get initial alignment, I noticed a grinding sensation. I initially thought it was related to my flange bearing, but discovered that my upper steering shaft is grinding on the square frame tubing of the dash area, just in front of the pillow bearing mount. Is it OK to file this area down slightly with a dremel?
 

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when turning my steering shaft to get initial alignment, I noticed a grinding sensation. I initially thought it was related to my flange bearing, but discovered that my upper steering shaft is grinding on the square frame tubing of the dash area, just in front of the pillow bearing mount. Is it OK to file this area down slightly with a dremel?
That's a relatively new design in that area. Others have reported the same thing. Put a couple washers under the bearing mount and you should be fine. No reason to cut anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #78
Caliper bolts have arrived, as have my new outer tire arm boots. So far in this build, the only parts that have asked for thread lock are the upper control arm ball joints. Should I be using maybe blue thread lock on anything, like the caliper bolts?
 

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Discussion Starter #79
Any recs on what bolt I should be using to connect the clutch quadrant assembly to the clutch pedal? The diagram shows a 3/8" x 1.25 in bolt but this isn't included in the pedal box assembly hardware kit. There's a couple of 3/8" hex head 1" bolts but I think they're to be used later in the build.
 

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I am may be in the minority but the only place I use loctite is on flywheel and drive shaft bolts. Flywheel because it is often specified and driveshaft because it is difficult to torque them properly.
 
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