Factory Five Racing Forum banner

1 - 20 of 310 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I started this thread under the new members intro, so I wanted to move it here instead. Here are some pics so far
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
alum panels

I've marked and drilled all my F, driver's side and passenger side footbox panels. Should I go ahead and drill all the other panels (firewall, trunk, and additional boxed panels) at this time or drill as I go? I'm not planning on powder coating, so I don't really need to prep all my panels at once. I was going to probably spray with rustoleum hammered paint for visible engine bay panels and bed liner for wheel well panels. thoughts?
 

·
Man Cave Master Craftsman
Joined
·
483 Posts
I started this thread under the new members intro, so I wanted to move it here instead. Here are some pics so far
Welcome to the Forum and congratulations! you've come to the right place, now let the fun begin! :grin2:

Saul
 

·
FFCobra Craftsman
Joined
·
22,128 Posts
Welcome egchewy. Could you add some info for us please. Go to the grey bar above and click 'User CP'. On the left side in "Edit your details" add your location and in 'Edit you signature' put a few details about your build like engine, trans, suspension.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
Welcome!

Which pedal box are you using? 'Cuz the front foot box panel you've got cleco'ed into place is for the OEM Mustang. If you're going with the Wilwood pedal box, you'll find the proper front panel in the box of all the other aluminum pieces.


John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
shoot...the wilwood pedals are the ones that come with the complete kit, right? thanks for the heads up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the tip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
1. Make sure to clean and scuff your panels, then use a good etching primer before painting with the hammered finish Rustoleum. Aluminum does not take paint well without proper prepping. I have not had good results with "all-in-one" paint primer on aluminum.

2. Drill the footbox panels,but don't attach the outer walls until as late as possible, giving you to the interior odds-n-ends, especially the driver's side. - Otherwise its a long reach down a narrow path for the pedal assembly wires,etc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Lower control arms attached. One of the spacers in the bushing was too long for the brackets on the frame and had to be removed and ground down to fit
 

Attachments

·
Not a waxer
Joined
·
11,554 Posts
One of the spacers in the bushing was too long for the brackets on the frame and had to be removed and ground down to fit
Do you mean the sleeve through the center of the polyurethane bushing? If so that is by design---the tabs (brackets) on the frame are intended to capture it so that when the bolt is tightened the tabs clamp the sleeve tight. They should not clamp against the polyurethane portion. If this is what you did you should have spread the tabs, not shortened the center sleeve.

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Yes, the metal portion was a bit too long on one of the lower arms. Fit perfectly on the other side. It was less than an 1/8in off so I just ground it down slightly. I wasn't sure if the powder coat made it too snug or if the piece was cut too long. It was sticking out of the plastic bushing slightly as well.

Jeff[/QUOTE]
 

·
Not a waxer
Joined
·
11,554 Posts
Yes, the metal portion was a bit too long on one of the lower arms. Fit perfectly on the other side. It was less than an 1/8in off so I just ground it down slightly. I wasn't sure if the powder coat made it too snug or if the piece was cut too long. It was sticking out of the plastic bushing slightly as well.
As I said, it is supposed stick out of the bushing. If you encounter that again spread the frame tabs rather than shortening the bushing sleeve.

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
F panels painted. I used truck bed liner on the wheel side and rustoleum hammered silver on engine bay side.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
upper control arm help

I put the ball joint into my upper control arm with red thread lock as recommended by the manual. when looking at the pictures, I noticed that the nuts of the control arm were on top and the bolt heads were on the bottom of the picture. After tightening everything down, I noticed that in the other pics, the zerk fittings were all supposed to be on the top, but I had installed the ball joint upside down. So currently, the zerk fitting of the ball joint is on top but the zerk fittings for the control arms are on the bottom. I had torqued the ball joints so tightly in a vise clamp that I can not get them unthreaded to turn them around, plus the thread lock is likely not helping. Is it OK to leave the upper control arm this way? The only drawback is that the zerk fittings on the control arm are on the bottom, right?
Needless to say, this is a pretty frustrating thing so early in the build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,781 Posts
Not OK. You need to get the arms flipped over so the zerks on the top. Notice it's not just the location of the zerks it's also because the pivot is toward the top. Unfortunately, not that it makes you feel any better, but this is a common mistake. The control arms need to look exactly like the pictures in the manual. You'll probably need to heat where you applied red Loctite. That's usually the only way to get it to break loose.

Separate topic -- I'm a little concerned about the bushing sleeve you ground down vs. spreading the tabs. Take a close look and make sure the control arm still moves OK. Those can be a little stiff even when installed as designed. You may want to think about replacing the part you ground down. Might be best in the long run. Just my opinion. Now is easier than later. Hint for your build: Don't grind or cut on anything until all other options are exercised. From my own experience, I've learned that more often it was because of something I was doing wrong vs. a part needing to be modified.
 

·
Not a waxer
Joined
·
11,554 Posts
If you loosen the nuts at the end of the crossbar and remove the nut & bolt connecting the links to the legs of the control arm you can slide the links off of the crossbar and flip them over so that the grease fitting points up. This will allow for easier lubing and also restore the proper control arm geometry.

With that said though, the bigger concern is whether you installed the ball joints from the proper direction. When configured and installed properly the control arms will look like this with the ball joint angling outward and the fittings on the crossbar links pointing up:



The arms are not side specific so when assembled correctly the welded, solid arm will be to the front on the driver's side and to the rear on the passenger side.

Good luck!

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
The part I ground down was maybe 1/16"too long. It fits very snugly now. LCA moves with very little play, especially with the spacer in the back bracket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,781 Posts
The part I ground down was maybe 1/16"too long. It fits very snugly now. LCA moves with very little play, especially with the spacer in the back bracket.
It wasn't too long. It's supposed to be that length. As Jeff pointed out, the proper solution was to widen the mounting ears. Properly installed, when the mounting bolts are torqued, the bushing is captured between the mounting ears with just enough clearance for the poly bushings to move. Now you have the chance the bushings are bound or at least dragging too much on the mounting ears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
This is how the BJs are on the UCA. is it possible the rest of the assembly was upside down?

looking at the pics again, I think I did put the BJs on correctly. I think the rest of the assembly is upside down. It looks like the bolts should be coming in from above and the nuts should be on the bottom? I'll flip everything around and keep the BJs in the UCAs as shown. On a separate note, you can see that the BJ is not fully seated in the UCA. This is as tight as I can get it even using a bench top clamp. Any suggestions getting these last 2 threads to turn? Do I need to get a torch? I've read some other forums complaining of the stock BJs that come with the complete kit and recommended getting other ball joints, in which case I'll need a torch to remove the current ones.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
It wasn't too long. It's supposed to be that length. As Jeff pointed out, the proper solution was to widen the mounting ears. Properly installed, when the mounting bolts are torqued, the bushing is captured between the mounting ears with just enough clearance for the poly bushings to move. Now you have the chance the bushings are bound or at least dragging too much on the mounting ears.
any recommendations on how to widen the tabs without scuffing up the powdercoating?
 
1 - 20 of 310 Posts
Top