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Windshield frame cut offs.

Just ready to install the windshield. Managed to get the frame pieces and windshield integrated without damaging the threads.

Next step is to cut off the excess frame material on the ends. Given there are some variables, isn't there a number that most if not all builders end up using?

rick
 

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Discussion Starter #302
Just ready to install the windshield. Managed to get the frame pieces and windshield integrated without damaging the threads.

Next step is to cut off the excess frame material on the ends. Given there are some variables, isn't there a number that most if not all builders end up using?

rick
I recall hearing they say cut off 2-inches at build school. I cut mine at an angle. 2-inches on one side, 2-7/8 inches on the other. That still leaves plenty of material below the hole, but also clears the chassis on both sides. It cuts pretty easily, but I would have them loose when cutting and also when drilling the holes. Good luck with those brass strips. I'm 3-for-3 replacing them with the SS version from Whitby.
 

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Discussion Starter #303 (Edited)
This Week’s Update

This is supposed to be Woodward Dream Cruise week here in SE Michigan. We got off to a good start with a kick-off barbecue last Sunday. But now two days in a row of events washed out due to rain. I’m sure there are lots of people out there having a good time. But open top Roadsters stay in the garage. More stuff Friday and the big event on Saturday. We’ll see what happens.

In the meantime, still plodding along trying to get the body ready for paint. With the body and windshield installed, located and cut the wiper box holes in the body. I admit to being a big chicken with that drill jig. I just can’t bring myself to use it directly to drill that big of a hole. Really don’t want it catching, jumping around, whatever. Plus fiberglass really is easy to work with.

I locate the holes and use the rubber gasket to trace the outline. Then after a small pilot hole, use a step bit to drill as much of the hole as I can. I keep the jig always in view to confirm the proper angle. It’s not super critical.


Then after using some round files to get close to the line, which takes just a few minutes, I use a small sanding drum to clean up the hole. I just happen to have one that is almost exactly the right final size.


Final product. Literally just takes a few minutes and no drama. Fits the wheel box perfectly.


I tried to use the angle spacers that FF provided. They are much improved over previous ones. But still just wasn’t happy with how they fit or held the angle. So made my own again from 3/4-inch square aluminum tubing. Have used this same approach on all three builds. With a little trial and error, they fit very well and hold the angle solidly. In the foreground is the metal tubing that FF now supplies in the wiper kit. Nice fit for the cable and similar to the fuel line tubing approach I’ve done before. Plus they’re nice and shiny. Can’t beat that! I’ll finalize the tubing with the body off. Just easier to see and reach everything.


Next up I located and mounted the seats. I’m not using any tracks (haven’t found them necessary) and I mount both sides as far back as possible. Works for me. The mistake I’ve seen people make though is they mount the seats without the body installed. Potentially a big mistake! They end up pretty close to the rear door opening (by the striker) so you want the body in place to prevent any interference. After getting them where I wanted, I mounted them with four bolts each. The front two are into the steel seat pan, with the inside one very near the main chassis 4-inch tube. The back outside is through the large 2-inch square tube. The back inside I tap threads into the top center of the main chassis 4-inch tube. This makes a nice solid mount. Note: The back outside bolt may need to be further toward the center if you have 3-link or 4-link. The LCA mounting brackets are right under the area where I placed the bolts here. That bracket isn’t there for an IRS chassis like this one.

Driver’s side:


Passenger side:


Seats now installed. The interior is looking more complete all the time.


Next I went after the front splash guards. For whatever reason, I have always struggled with these. I’m now 3-for-3 messing around with these more than I would like. I’ve read all the threads and tried everything. This time around, the very top was OK, but they weren’t really wide enough at the top side, too wide at the bottom side, and overall too long. They absolutely wouldn’t fit into the available opening without cutting off the bottom some which includes the little mounting tab. I tried messing with the bend, flattening them out some. Tried adjusting the angle on the F-panel. And tried every possible location in the actual body. All helped a little I guess, but in the end I still had some gaps around the top and top side. I would have just made new ones (done that before…) but since these were already powder coated white from FF as part of the Anniversary package, really wanted to use them. What I did was order some larger bulb seal from McMaster. Part number 1120A191 which has a 1-inch bulb vs. the FF supplied 3/4-inch bulb. That is going to work. With the bottom cut off I fit to the body and riveted on two new tabs made from the famous donor fan mounting strips FF provides. I’ve lost track how many little parts I’ve made from those pieces. Nice mild steel that is easy to work with and more durable than something made from .040 aluminum. Final results, and they fit quite well:


Finally, today I took everything back apart and lifted off the body for I think the last time. I have a punch list of things to do to the body, including the truck bedliner. Then it’s back on the chassis for final panel fit and ready for the painter.


One last non-build related update, but in the end has significant impact. I’ve mentioned the possibility of a real estate deal and a possible new improved workplace. Well, looks like it’s going to happen. Our current home is under contract. Only took about 10 days and deal looks solid. The deal on the new place that started all of this has a couple details remaining, but is also about wrapped up. So we have the not so enviable task of moving all our possessions about 2 miles north starting in a couple weeks. We’re excited about it because it’s a ranch all on one level which is exactly what my wife needs. It is however a bit of a fixer, so between moving and doing the initial remodel work, my build is going to take a lower priority and even will have a bit of a time out I think. Probably several months at least. We’ll see what that really means over the next week or two as things get firmed up. But I’m not going to rush the build. It will still be there after we move. There really is a house involved with this deal, but here’s the good part for the hobby: 950+ square foot finished garage with a 14-foot ceiling. It’s a truss roof, so it’s wide open. No posts, beams, etc. The previous owner wasn't a car guy, but he could have been! We can’t get in unless our agent is with us, but I did sneak up there and snap a picture with #7750 lurking at the doors. Looks right at home. With only one DD (which can now always have a space) I think I will have enough room. Also, since it's more in the country plus a large lot (2.8 acres) I can keep my trailer on site. I think this could work. ;)

 

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Good on ya' with the new home deal Paul! I think you know that 2016 is a moving year for Nancy and myself as well (about a year ago she declared "we need less house and you need more garage" :yes:) with the difference being that I am building ours. We were in the other house for 18 years---man, let me tell ya', we humans can accumulate a lot of stuff! Although we purged and condensed it still isn't enough. We packed what was left and settled into a rental while I build then we'll get to move it all again...:surprise: At least you'll only have to move once! Sounds like a great find; here's hoping everything works out and the transition goes smoothly!

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #305
Good on ya' with the new home deal Paul! I think you know that 2016 is a moving year for Nancy and myself as well (about a year ago she declared "we need less house and you need more garage" :yes:) with the difference being that I am building ours. We were in the other house for 18 years---man, let me tell ya', we humans can accumulate a lot of stuff! Although we purged and condensed it still isn't enough. We packed what was left and settled into a rental while I build then we'll get to move it all again...:surprise: At least you'll only have to move once! Sounds like a great find; here's hoping everything works out and the transition goes smoothly!

Jeff
Thanks Jeff. I don't have the energy (or patience...) to build a whole house. But we will be knocking down a few walls and re-configuring the master bedroom and bath plus a few changes in the kitchen. That will be enough for me. We've been in this house 14 years so have accumulated more than our share of stuff as well. At least we're only going to move once. Good luck with your home building.
 

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Congrats Edward on the new digs.....so I imagine when the agent showed your house the couple looked in the garage. The husband probably heard angels singing and thought "so that's what real men do in a garage....I wanna be a real man"...and said "WE'LL TAKE IT"....da Bat
 

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That garage is fantastic, and I am sure the house is OK too. We moved two years ago after 22 yrs in the other house. Man, I spent a lot of time making dump runs. It's tough making decisions. I tried to go w/ the 'if i haven't touched it in two years it's trash', theory. But that gets real hard when it's stuff related to your kid growing up. Moving only a few miles will make things a lot easier. For instance, the moving company looked at my shelves of paint and auto chemicals and said we can't take any of that. TG we only moved about 40 miles so I could move the stuff they wouldn't.
 

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Discussion Starter #308
Congrats Edward on the new digs.....so I imagine when the agent showed your house the couple looked in the garage. The husband probably heard angels singing and thought "so that's what real men do in a garage....I wanna be a real man"...and said "WE'LL TAKE IT"....da Bat
Pretty funny... We weren't around for any of the showings but the garage and its contents were mentioned in several of the feedbacks. Can't say whether it helped the sale or not. The couple buying the house are a relo for one of the large local automotive suppliers. Won't say the name but one everyone would certainly recognize. May not be a car guy, but probably at least a passing interest. It will all be gone except for a few oil stains on the floor.

That garage is fantastic, and I am sure the house is OK too. We moved two years ago after 22 yrs in the other house. Man, I spent a lot of time making dump runs. It's tough making decisions. I tried to go w/ the 'if i haven't touched it in two years it's trash', theory. But that gets real hard when it's stuff related to your kid growing up. Moving only a few miles will make things a lot easier. For instance, the moving company looked at my shelves of paint and auto chemicals and said we can't take any of that. TG we only moved about 40 miles so I could move the stuff they wouldn't.
Yea, we still have a bunch of stuff from both of our kids. Plus our own of course. We're going to try to slim things down a bit, but I'm betting most of it makes it to the new place. :tongue_smilie:
 

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Congratulations on the new house Paul. I really like a ranch-style house, and your future garage can't be beat.

One thing I learned how to do in my military career was move (and I didn't move nearly as much as most folks). I could go from boxes delivered to everything unpacked, in place, and pictures on the wall in three days. But not now with two little kids. I started the move in by setting up the stereo...

Don't forget to throw stuff out when you unpack! I usually threw away 80-100% as much at the new house as I did packing up the old.


John

P.S. Oh yeah; the build is looking as fantastic as ever!
 

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Discussion Starter #310 (Edited)
Side Louvers

Today I finished the body side louver installation. Pretty minor update, but some aspects that newer builders may find helpful. Still fitting in a little build activity around our real estate dealings. Down to the last few details. This week we hope to close out the last couple contingencies and firm up the closing dates for both properties around the end of September. Meanwhile, back to the build while I can.

I bought the assembled side louver set from Factory Five. These appear to be exactly the same as the Finishline ones I used on the Mk3 build. I polished the last ones, which wasn't easy. So decided to have these powder coated, and chose a bright silver color. They turned out nice. I bolted the mounting brackets on each side as mentioned in a previous update. There is regular discussion on both forums about how best to mount these things to the body and always seems to draw lots of different opinions. Velcro, silicone, etc. I’m 3-for-3 mounting them with McMaster 10-32 perforated base studs, part number 97590A569, and bonding the studs to the inside of the body with 3M HSRF. Applied properly they will never come loose, it looks neat and clean, and they’re easy to install and remove once the studs are bonded to the body.

I captured the studs on the mounting brackets with nuts on each side, determined where they would attach on the inside of the body centered in the pre-cut opening, roughed up the body with 60 grit paper, and bonded them in place. I used rubber bands looped around the louvers in two places and held in place by paint sticks while the HSRF cured. The clothes pins helped hold the rubber bands while I fed the paint sticks through. I only had used paint sticks on hand. Nice. One of the colors in our family room and not sure about the other one...


Once cured, removed the louvers and the studs are bonded in place for good. Used a Dremel to clean things up a little and added a little more HSRF in any voids. Then trimmed the bolts to have a more reasonable length.


Re-installed the louvers.


Now for a very important part. The precut openings were reasonably close, but not finished products at all. Drew parallel lines top and bottom. Then drew lines on each side parallel with the angle of the louvers. This is a critical step and IMO makes the difference between a pro looking job and one that isn’t as much. Also, ideally the width between the last louver and the body on each side should the same as the width of the inner louvers. They louvers weren’t quite long enough, but got them close.


While doing the final fitting, I noted that the louvers didn’t fit flush against the inside of the body. Further review showed the rear part of the louver is too high. I trimmed them on my disk sander until they were flat. Roughly in the area noted here. The sanding removed the powder coat on the edge, but it’s inside against the body and doesn’t show.


With the body trimmed to the lines, a radius sanded all around, and the louvers trimmed so they fit flush, the final product.


Nothing else to do with these except put them back in after paint.

Also, I nearly completed the wipers. With the two wheelboxes mounted in the body, made up the tube that goes between the two plus the little stub for the end of the cable to run in. I was planning to use the nice shiny tubing that came with the wiper kit from FF. Looks like it's SS. But it's rock hard so apparently not annealed. Even my nice Eastwood pro flare tool wouldn't dent it. The tubing would slide before making a decent flare, no matter how tight I tried to clamp it in the flaring tool. So went back to my old standby. 5/16-inch steel fuel tubing. It's the perfect size for the cable and flares like butter with the Eastwood tool. Made the two pieces and clamped them into the wheelboxes while they were in the body. Sets everything at the right angle. I'll make the last piece between the motor and the PS wheelbox when the body is back on.


This is a closer picture of the 3/4-inch square aluminum spacers I mentioned in a previous update. These instead of the rubber tubing supplied with the kit. Once the right angle and length was determined, spotted them in place to the base of the wheelbox with JB Weld. Not necessary once they're all together. But keeps things lined up for final assembly. Plus I apparently just like to glue stuff...


Couple more things to do to the body, including the truck bedliner coating, and I'll get the body back on the chassis. Likely will be my stopping place until after the move.
 

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Last night I made the 3/4-inch transmission spacer. $8 dollar piece of 1-1/4 x 3/4 x 12 inch chunk of 6061 from McMaster with two 1/2-inch holes on 5-9/16 centers and a little paint and it’s ready to install.

Hey Paul. I know this particular post is from a ways back, but over the months I've noticed you manage to get a real nice radius on your aluminum parts, like this one. What is your secret? Is there some special disks or belts for aluminum? Thanks. Always enjoy your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #312
Hey Paul. I know this particular post is from a ways back, but over the months I've noticed you manage to get a real nice radius on your aluminum parts, like this one. What is your secret? Is there some special disks or belts for aluminum? Thanks. Always enjoy your progress.
Nothing secret or special. I use plain old 80 grit disks on my Delta stationery disk sander. That generally gets the parts pretty clean and straight. Then I usually hit them with 220 grit using a block sander, break the edges a bit, and call it a day. That's Eastwood Extreme Chassis Black satin spray, which I like a lot. Seems durable and covers up pretty well.
 

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Discussion Starter #313 (Edited)
Footboxes

Another quick update as I’m wrapping up chassis details. I installed the final two panels on the DS footbox. Outside top and side. I had previously given them the full Lizard Skin treatment, so just a matter of the usual silicone and rivets to make them permanent. Then a little touch-up of Lizard Skin around the inside to completely seal it up. You can see the bolts for the Russ Thompson dead pedal. More about that later.


Also bolted on the access cover. I had previously installed nutserts and also put some coats of Lizard Skin on the underside of the cover in the area of the opening. None around the edges so it fits nice and flush. Feels good to see that installed. Hopefully it stays there for a good while.


I really like a dead pedal to rest my left foot while cruising. On my previous Mk4 I used the Russ Thompson bolt-on dead pedal sold by Breeze. Very happy with it so did the same thing here. Sitting in the seat, I used some double back tape and found the best angle and depth to fit my foot. Then drilled the mounting holes. Note this is the older version of the footbox sheet metal. I don't have the little bumpout like on the newest sheet metal. I'm assuming this same dead pedal would still work, but I don't know for sure.

Since the dead pedal goes on top of the carpet, and I wanted to install it for good, went ahead and installed the carpet. Actually this is a good time to do the footbox carpet before the body is on. Easier to reach back in there. So I installed the outside and back piece. It comes in one piece from FF, but I cut it and installed in two pieces. Just easier to position. Nearly completed DS footbox and pedal area:


Since I was doing carpet, did the same area on the PS. Also cut the single piece and installed as two pieces.


I’ve tried a number of different methods to attach carpet (contact cement, silicone, spray adhesive, etc.) and like Outdoor Carpet Adhesive far and away the best. It’s strong like contact cement, but allows some re-positioning. You only have to apply it on one surface with a 1/8-inch notched trowel, place the carpet, and then a roller to lock it down. Works really great. I use the DAP product. I find the solvent based stuff works a little better than the water based. Just more aggressive when you push the carpet down and sets up faster. Not easy to find though. I order it on Amazon. Note that if you get any of this adhesive on the good side of the carpet (it happens...) a little mineral spirits on a paper towel and it cleans right off. Doesn't seem to harm the carpet.


Tomorrow I’m going to start the final details on the body, and then drop it on the chassis probably early next week. Then I expect to start my time out. Our house deals are progressing with basically all details completed. Closings are supposed to be one month from today and we have a lot of work to do to get organized for our big move. Then I have an ever increasing list of things to do on the new place. At some point I hope to find a gap and finish up what's needed so I can get this thing to paint. But it's going to be a few months from now at least. We'll see. Gotta save some of this build for my new expanded garage and workspace.
 

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Discussion Starter #314
Body Work Progressing

Just about ready to put the body back on prior to final panel fit and then ready to go off to paint. While doing the basic trimming and cleanup, I noted 5-6 spots that needed some repair. Mostly just minor stuff like the gel coat chipped on the ends of the cockpit roll around dash and back wall, couple of chips around the front radiator opening, etc. Also decided to tighten up the holes cut for the windshield post. Once the windshield was fitted, I had some pretty big openings between the post and the body. You don’t want the post touching the body, and the provided covers would have covered the holes I had. But it was kind of a lot, and close to where one of the mounting holes needed to be on one side. They need to be sealed from the underside after final assembly to keep water from running in. Having them closer just gives less to seal. Plus looks better. Like that matters...

Additionally, I like to add a filet on the inside of the wheel lips. On the Mk3 (and maybe earlier, but I don’t have experience with those) the wheel lips once trimmed were a pretty sharp edge and it was common practice to add a “roll” or filet to give a more finished appearance. The Mk4 body is much better and once trimmed can be left as is and still look good. But I added the filet on my previous build and chose to do the same again on this one. Once the area behind the lip is filled, they can be rounded over and gives a nice solid look with nothing hollow behind. I like it. The material of choice for this as well as the previously mentioned repairs is 3M’s HSRF (High Strength Repair Filler). Same stuff used to bond the perforated based studs mentioned before. It’s specifically made for vinylester glass, like the FF fiberglass parts, and is amazingly strong. Like most material of this type, is a 2-part product with a small tube of hardener. It takes a few tries to get the feel for how much to use. To keep moving you want it to set up pretty quickly, but not too fast! It’s not impossible to sand, but not easy either. Best to get it as close as you can before it sets.

After doing all the little repairs noted, did the wheel lips as described. After searching far and wide, found the best forming tool.


Some shots of the finished product.




Next up was the body undercoat. This isn’t mentioned in the FF instruction book as I recall. But it’s a step many builders add. Accomplishes at least two things. First gives an overall uniform and clean appearance to the underside of the body. Not too important for much of the body, but some of it shows behind the wheels in the wheel wells, some in the trunk, and also you can see the inside of the body behind the F-panels under the hood. Just looks better. But more important is that it gives a measure of protection to the body from stones or whatever being thrown up into the body and potentially cracking the glass or staring the paint. There are a number of different products on the market. I chose to use the Duplicolor Bed Armor product. Happened to be on sale at Advance Auto. Plus, it’s water based which helps for an already pretty messy process. This is the first time I’ve done the underside myself. Last two times were by the painter. I don’t know how much they charged, but I’m sure more than the < $100 for the materials to DIY. It’s not hard, but took several hours and would have been easier if I had gotten the body up off the ground. (OK, I know I’m really spoiled…). The undercoat material has a lot of solid material (I assume ground up rubber?) in suspension. Needs to be stirred constantly and doesn’t brush all that easily. The roller that comes with the kit does a good job, but has a really short nap so doesn’t work in the curves or irregular surfaces all that well. I used a combination of brushes and the provided roller. I put a couple coats on the entire underside and another heavy one in the wheel wells. Still have a little left over that I’ll use for the splash guards.

All ready:


Done:


Instructions say 72 hours for full cure. With as humid as it’s been, it will take every bit of that. I’ll get the body onto the chassis in a couple days. Back to packing!
 

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Also decided to tighten up the holes cut for the windshield post. Once the windshield was fitted, I had some pretty big openings between the post and the body. You don’t want the post touching the body, and the provided covers would have covered the holes I had. But it was kind of a lot, and close to where one of the mounting holes needed to be on one side. They need to be sealed from the underside after final assembly to keep water from running in. Having them closer just gives less to seal. Plus looks better. Like that matters...
Any pics or tricks on how you tightened up the holes cut for the windshield post? I have the same problem (maybe worse with my lack of experience).

Thanks.
Wade
 

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Discussion Starter #316 (Edited)
Any pics or tricks on how you tightened up the holes cut for the windshield post? I have the same problem (maybe worse with my lack of experience).

Thanks.
Wade
It will be a couple days before the body is right side up and I can take some pics. But I'm not sure it would add too much. I'll try to describe what I did. I don't think anything terribly special. When I was done fitting the windshield I had nice even 1/8-inch gaps on one side of each post and larger irregular gaps on the other. I marked where the other side gaps should be while the posts were still in the hole. With everything apart I put a piece of Gorilla tape (like that stuff) on the underside of the holes. Then I filled the space I wanted to leave with a filler. I used balsa wood (lots left over from my R/C days) because it's easy to shape and soft enough to get back out of the hole later. Then I filled the remaining opening with HSRF. Made sure it completely filled the hole and was slightly above the surface of the body. Once the HSRF set, sanded it flush with the body, removed the tape and broke out the balsa filler. Left a nice clean and even slot on each side. The patches will be completely covered by the trim plates, so won't show if they should shrink a little or whatever.

Hope that makes sense and answers your question.
 

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It will be a couple days before the body is right side up and I can take some pics. But I'm not sure it would add too much. I'll try to describe what I did. I don't think any terribly special. When I was done fitting the windshield I had nice even 1/8-inch gaps on one side of each post and larger irregular gaps on the other. I marked where the other side gaps should be while the posts were still in the hole. With everything apart I put a piece of Gorilla tape (like that stuff) on the underside of the holes. Then I filled the space I wanted to leave with a filler. I used balsa wood (lots left over from my R/C days) because it's easy to shape and soft enough to get back out of the hole later. Then I filled the remaining opening with HSRF. Made sure it completely filled the hole and was slightly above the surface of the body. Once the HSRF set, sanded it flush with the body, removed the tape and broke out the balsa filler. Left a nice clean and even slot on each side. The patches will be completely covered by the trim plates, so won't show if they should shrink a little or whatever.

Hope that makes sense and answers your question.
Excellent. Thanks very much. I can do that LOL
 

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Hi Edward,
Love your work!
I'm currently installing the same rear brake setup as you, however I'm having trouble with the ebrake cable fitting the wilwood ebrake calliper. There seems to be a 0.5mm variation in diameter between the calliper mount hole and the ebrake shroud. Is this meant to be a press fit?
Alex.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #319
Hi Edward,
Love your work!
I'm currently installing the same rear brake setup as you, however I'm having trouble with the ebrake cable fitting the wilwood ebrake calliper. There seems to be a 0.5mm variation in diameter between the calliper mount hole and the ebrake shroud. Is this meant to be a press fit?
Alex.
Thanks! Much appreciated. I found the fit of the e-brake cable end into the Wilwood caliper to be a very tight fit, but it went in without any modification, drilling, etc. It needs to be pushed in exactly straight, which takes a little care since the cable is pretty stiff and curved at that point. Once it's in, an interference fit. I didn't see any provision for a retainer, c-clip, whatever. Seems to be staying in just fine though.
 

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Hi Edward,
Love your work!
I'm currently installing the same rear brake setup as you, however I'm having trouble with the ebrake cable fitting the wilwood ebrake calliper. There seems to be a 0.5mm variation in diameter between the calliper mount hole and the ebrake shroud. Is this meant to be a press fit?
Alex.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I have the same E-brake assembly and had the same concern. I now have 500 miles on the car, and no issues have been encountered. The system works well, with just one click of the handle to set the brakes.

Rick
 
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