Factory Five Racing Forum banner

261 - 280 of 501 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #261
Go-Kart Time!

Spent yesterday wrapping up the final details for the go-kart. Dropped the chassis off the lift and onto its wheels for the first time. Found the place that mounted my tires had them at 40psi. So backed them down to 22 front and 24 rear. Then set ride height. I left it about 1/2-inch high front and back. Normally ride height will settle a little, plus still a few hundred pounds to go with the body and related.

Then I took my first pass at front and rear alignment. I haven’t done an IRS build before, so this was a first. The new 2015 Mustang IRS is easy, as I understand, compared to the former T-Bird version. Nothing to take apart. Loosen two lock nuts to adjust camber, and two more to adjust toe. They do interact a bit, but generally was pretty easy. The specs are camber: -0.5° to -0.75° and total toe: 1/8-inch toe in. Probably the biggest challenge was to get my Fastrax camber/caster gauge to fit onto the new wheels. The large radius on the wheel lip is cool looking, but doesn’t give much to hang onto. I figured out a way and got the rear alignment set. Then moved to the front. Here I was shooting for camber: -0.5°, caster: +8°, and total toe: 1/16-inch toe in. Note the higher caster number is possible with power steering. Manual steering would be lower. Took a couple hours because they were pretty far off from the build and they all interact to some extent. But got them real close I think. I was happy to get the higher caster number without having to modify the rear adjuster on the UCA. I’ve read where some had to shorten it a bit. In addition to the Fastrax tool, I use Heidt’s steel toe plates and a magnetic laser level. The combination of toe plates and the laser level replaces the use of strings that a lot of guys do.

Couple other quick comments. I’ve noticed after starting the Coyote now a number of times that in addition to it starting almost immediately, the ignition key start position initiates the start sequence as soon as you turn the key. And it’s not necessary to hold the key in start until the engine is running. Basically it works just like a start button, which of course us how a Mustang is set up. Note this is only the case if using the Coyote controls pack start function and wire to the starter. The updated Coyote instructions from FF show using the RF harness for the ignition key and starter. It would work in the more traditional manner. Also, just for grins I plugged my Innovate LM-2 into the ODB port just to see if it worked (it does) and what I could read. There is a ton of stuff, and lots more to learn about there. But what I did note was three ODB trouble codes. I looked them up. One was related to engine temp and sensor, the other two were bank 1 and bank 2 intake manifold runner controls. I cleared the codes, and ran the engine several times and no codes noted. After my go-karts this AM, where it probably ran 30 minutes or more, also still no codes. So maybe those were from sometime during the engine install where the PCM was powered up but not everything was hooked up yet. But I’ll keep an eye on it. I have the Coyote check engine light as an indicator on my dash, and it hasn’t lit yet.

OK, so on with the go-kart. Really nothing earthshaking to report. Everything seems to be working OK. The GPS speedo is working and I’m now showing .7 miles on the odometer. That’s just going up and down a side street maybe 6-8 times. The clutch engagement is in just the right place and the pedal force is smooth and relatively light. That 1-inch clutch MC is perfect. Just the slightest amount of clutch chatter while starting out. But that’s maybe me getting used to it plus I was being very gentle with the throttle. The manual Wilwood brakes are OK, but clearly need to be bedded and broken in further. The accelerator (DBW) felt quite normal. I have heard from others there is a delay when pushing in and releasing. But I’m not noticing that at all. Feels pretty direct to me. Power steering works very well and maybe is a bit light. But we'll see after real driving. Easy enough to adjust by changing a valve on the KRC pump. I only used 1st and 2nd, and max speed according to the GPS speedo memory was 27 mph. So not exactly killing it. Speed limit in our sub is 25, plus just taking it easy and trying not to attract too much attention. The main takeaway from the entire experience was those sticky Goodrich tires were pelting me with every manner of small stones from the street. The trunk and cockpit are full of them now. Next order of business will be to get out the shop vac.

This is the very first drive after backing out of my driveway. I was obviously being very gentle getting the feel for things and making sure all worked OK:

https://youtu.be/tHi0rsHEoas

Took it up a notch the second time around:

https://youtu.be/G-JP9hmSwis

And maybe just a bit more this time. Still baby steps though.

https://youtu.be/I55VraeTBU4

I can tell the Coyote is going to be very responsive and strong. It certainly has a different sound than previous SBF builds. Just a couple more details and I’ll be starting body work and install.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Congrats Edward. Great to see you hit this huge milestone and good to hear that you aren't having any issues with the new coyote.

Jeremiah
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #263 (Edited)
First Car Show

Beautiful 70+ degree and sunny day here in Michigan. Just for grins, got out the trailer and took the new build to a July 4th cruise-in today instead of driving #7750 like we normally do. I knew there would be a number of our local club members in attendance, and thought they would be interested in seeing the progress. Spent the three hours talking nearly non-stop to many attendees. Not many get to see a build at that stage, so they were very interested. Talked to several people who were seeing Factory Five for the first time. They were very impressed. Continue to be amazed at how that Coyote runs.

One of our club members told people my snake was shedding its skin. Clever. :rolleyes:


 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
8,350 Posts
Paul, how much clearance do you have between the crank pulley and the 4" cross member up front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #265
Paul, how much clearance do you have between the crank pulley and the 4" cross member up front.
It's pretty close! The pulley is about 1/2-inch above the cross member and about 1-inch overlapping the back edge of the cross member.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #266 (Edited)
This Week's Update

While the Coyote seems to start and run perfectly, one thing I had noticed was that the MIL (Malfunction Indicator Light) did not appear to be working properly. I called Ford Racing tech support. But Ray, the person they thought could help, was on vacation until next week. I started a separate thread on both forums looking for the experience of others. Seems no one else had it working either. With further study and experimenting, I was able to get it working.

I hadn't noticed it before, but the version of instructions I received with the controls pack last October had incorrect and conflicting info about the MIL. This week I downloaded the version from the Ford Performance website -- which I have to assume is the most current -- and compared it page by page. Some of the discrepancies related to the MIL are fixed, but there's still a contradiction. At the top of page 15, it says to connect blunt lead 4 (MIL) to the negative lead on the indicator. In the middle of the same page it says to connect blunt lead 9 (ground) to the negative lead on the indicator. Now I'm no EE, but pretty sure you need to pick one or the other.

When I wired the build initially, I wired the MIL with the positive lead to blunt lead 4 and the negative lead to ground. The table on page 14 of the instructions suggests that's how it should be wired. But it doesn't work if wired that way. This week I disconnected my previous work and jumpered it to be a ground switching circuit. Hooked the blunt lead 4 to the negative lead on the indicator and the positive lead to an ignition switched 12V source. Of the several ways it's suggested to be wired, that one seemed the most consistent.

At first I didn't think this worked either because the indicator light only flashed briefly when the key was turned, rather than staying lit until the engine starts as the instructions say on page 7. I tried pulling the MAF sensor connector, but that only created a no-start condition and no DTC's. So I pulled the throttle body connector. Although a bit ragged (no surprise) the engine started and the light popped on. Yea! Scanned the ODB port and had two TPS related codes. Plugged the connector back in, cleared the codes, started the engine, and the light turned back off. I repeated the sequence again with the same result.

I'm now satisfied that the MIL is working correctly other than not staying lit until the engine starts. That isn't a problem. The flash tells you it's alive and there aren't any stored codes. Just different than what the instructions say. Note that it does just barely glow all the time the Coyote PCM is powered on. You can't see it in the daylight, and it's just barely visible at night. I measured a little over two volts on the light all the time. But full voltage is applied when there's a fault, so there's no missing it. Not too excited about intentionally introducing faults because I'm a complete amateur and don't want to hurt anything. So happy to stop. Today I took out the jumpers and made the wiring changes permanent.

Here's proof my MIL is working. This is with DTC’s P0122 and P0223 thrown when I disconnected the throttle body connector. With the codes cleared, the MIL turned back off. Note this is not the LED provided with the Coyote controls pack. It’s one that matches the other indicators on my dash from Watson’s Streetworks.


One other comment FWIW. While speaking to Ford Racing about the MIL problem, he asked me if I was using a custom tune in my installation. I said "not yet" but would in the future if driveability isn't OK or I think I need to find more power. He cautioned that I should get a new tune regardless, and that I risked damage to the engine if I didn't. He said the non-stock intake and to a lessor extent the non-stock exhaust may cause the A/F to be off enough to cause damage. I said I thought the PCM would adjust the A/F, and he said yes but maybe not enough. He said it was OK to start and run, but not to put any load on it until it was dyno tuned. Frankly this surprises me. Some on the forum agree with this, others have reported long term use and mileage with no issues. There are at least two very well known tuners in my area. Still thinking about this one.

Meanwhile, back on the build, I've also been working on the transmission cover. I filled the existing cutout and made a new round one where needed for my TKO rear shifter. I’m planning to cover it with 1/8-inch foam padding and leather, same as the dash, so it’s necessary for it to be smooth and flat. I’m also installing a traditional looking ashtray (convenience bin???) like the originals and like my last build. I like the classic look, and it’s handy for storing really small stuff. I use it for my ear plugs. But since there’s a lot of air pressure in the transmission tunnel and the ashtray isn't sealed at all, I bent a small box out of sheet metal and aluminum for it to sit in and attached to the bottom of the transmission cover. Still a little more left to finish this up, but close.

Doubler used to hold the patch in place and box for the ashtray.


Fitting the trim pieces:


What it looks like in the cockpit. I’ll be using a shift lever boot from Mike Everson, same as my last build.


Today we retrieved the body from the storage unit where it’s been hanging since last summer. Another pretty big milestone in the build. Felt good getting it over here. Next up is to get it trimmed and fitted. Usually the body is stored over the chassis, but I’m switching things up a bit this time.


Also today FedEx dropped a small package from Factory Five. I hadn’t heard about this. FF made a technical change to the 2015 IRS and obviously thought it was important enough to send to previous purchasers. Great customer service FF! If you have the 2015 IRS and haven’t received, I’m assuming you will soon. Should be pretty easy and quick to remove the old parts and install the new ones. I’m hoping it doesn’t change the rough alignment I’ve already completed.


Will be out of town for a few days this coming week, but still hope to get started with the body work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,015 Posts
Jeez Paul even your garage is spotless. Mine looks like hell around the roadster with tools everywhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #268
Jeez Paul even your garage is spotless. Mine looks like hell around the roadster with tools everywhere.
Thanks, I think. :) That picture was taken after I had cleaned up and put things away getting ready to move the body in. I do a lot of work in my basement workshop, and trust me it's not nearly so neat and clean. But I do have a work habit of putting most tools away, at least the small stuff, at the end of every work session. Otherwise I end up spending way too much time looking for things. I find that incredibly frustrating...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #269
Wiring Spreadsheet

Now that I have the wiring (I hope!) done and all seems to be working OK, here's a spreadsheet that has everything. Including how I hooked up the 2015 Coyote. Includes the most recent changes to get the MIL working. Note, for the record, there are some differences between this and the FF Coyote installation instructions. (1) Coyote harness and PCM/PDB is used for the start function vs. RF harness, (2) no firewall solenoid, and (3) master disconnect installed. Hopefully this will be a resource to others with similar builds.

Note this is a .zip file. Open the zip after downloading and the spreadsheet will be there. Also note there are four different tabs in the worksheet.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #270
2015 IRS Tech Update Installed

Also today FedEx dropped a small package from Factory Five. I hadn’t heard about this. FF made a technical change to the 2015 IRS and obviously thought it was important enough to send to previous purchasers. Great customer service FF! If you have the 2015 IRS and haven’t received, I’m assuming you will soon. Should be pretty easy and quick to remove the old parts and install the new ones. I’m hoping it doesn’t change the rough alignment I’ve already completed.

Got the revised pieces installed today. Pretty easy. Took only about an hour or so, and that including removing and replacing the wheels/tires that I had previously installed. I thought about trying to do the installation without removing the wheels, but it's pretty tight quarters and you need room to loosen/tighten that 100 ft/lbs bolt plus you'd have to hold up everything once the bolt was pulled. So decided against it. The new fitting places the Heim joint exactly the same distance from the knuckle, so I'm satisfied my preliminary alignment wasn't affected. The only minor glitch was the new instructions say to re-use the washers from the previous installation. But my previous installation parts and instructions didn't say anything about washers, and I didn't have any 5/8-inch hardened washers in stock. Quick Lowes run and good to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #271 (Edited)
Still Working

Was away from home several days last week, so progress was slowed. But still plugging away. My main focus has been working on the body. Because of the dust, I prefer to work outside on the drive. But it’s been pretty warm (by Michigan standards) so my main work time has been earlier in the day for a few hours at a time. I have the hood, trunk and door openings all trimmed and straight. All the light openings are ready for fixtures. Also knocked down the parting lines, but will leave the final work for the painter. That’s about all I can do with it right side up. So today took it off the body buck for hopefully the last time. Tomorrow I’ll flip it over on its back and do the perimeter, wheel lips, cockpit front and back, front grille openings, etc. At that point, will be ready to drop on the chassis for the first time.


I also finished the transmission tunnel cover. I came up with a method for the mounting to be hidden. I painted two coats each of Lizard Skin sound and heat insulation on the bottom. Today I took it to the auto upholstery shop I use. They’re going to install the leather. I decided some stitching along the corners would look nice and that’s not something I can do. It’s supposed to be done later this week, so I’ll post some pictures when it’s done. They’re also stitching the pockets for the leather door panels I made.

While we were in Cleveland last week for my wife’s annual checkup, I made the obligatory run down to Summit Racing in Tallmadge. I wanted to pick up the fire extinguisher and mounting. The sales tax for a local purchase is cheaper than the hazmat charge to ship it, so that was a good excuse to visit. I’m using the same H3R Performance HalGuard 1.4 pound bottle I’ve used before, but wanted to look at a couple different mounts. Another advantage of visiting in person. But I ended up with the same polished band and flat surface mounts I’ve used before. Not cheap (how many times have I said that?) but they’re very nice quality.


One last comment about Coyote tuning. I’ve mentioned this in a couple of my updates plus the recommendation from Ford Racing to do a custom tune or risk damage to the engine. I’ve been in touch with a couple local dyno shops recommended by Ford, and they either don’t work on the crate version of the Coyote or don’t have any appointment openings for months. So I’ve done some preliminary research and looks like a remote tune is the way to go. Lots of information in this thread. http://www.ffcars.com/forums/45-ford-modular-engine-roadster-builds/570489-sct-aed-jms-dyno.html. The tuner I’m seriously considering only tunes with log files and I need the build to be legal and on the road to capture the data. So won’t be doing anything until next year. One of the main learning points here IMO is that any build with a Coyote needs to include a tune in the budget. Somewhere in the $500 - $700 range is probably where to start. Note this includes a hardware device (there are several different varieties) to load the tunes, collect logs, and also can be used as a real time monitor, read and clear DTC's, etc. I know there are many that run Coyotes without custom tunes. But the overwhelming feedback is that it should be part of a Coyote build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #273
It's On

Body prep is underway in earnest. Managed to be right in the middle of the hottest days so far this summer, so moved indoors. Temporarily banished #7750 over to it's off-site storage location and threw a tarp over the new build. I'm totally trashing my garage but it will clean up easy enough. I'm about 3/4 of the way around the perimeter getting everything straight, wheel openings trimmed, etc. I'm doing most of the work with different size drum sanders on a corded drill, a belt sander, and various sanding blocks and straightedges. This isn't my most favorite part of the build, but I'll deliver the build to the painter essentially ready to fill, prime and paint. Sorry for the crummy smartphone picture.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #274 (Edited)
Body On Plus

Today the body is back on the chassis. First time it’s been there since we brought the kit home from FF almost one year ago.

Saturday I completed the first pass at all the body clean-up. Of the three Roadster bodies I’ve had, this one is probably the cleanest. The Mk3 really doesn’t count because the Mk4’s are so much better. But this is probably a bit better than #7750. Everything lines up across the parting lines. I knocked down the parting lines just enough to see they shouldn’t need any special treatment. Just the usual body filler with everything else. Hood and trunk lid look perfect. We'll see about the doors. I’ve got 4 small chips in the gel coat (underside of the radiator inlet, ends of the dash roll, one end of the rear cockpit roll) that I’ll touch up with HSRF and it should be good to go. Overall, I’m very pleased with the quality. I gave it a good solvent wash and then a bath with a hose and some Soft Scrub and a scouring pad. All the wax, mold release, whatever, should be gone.

Spent a little while cleaning all the dust in the garage and rolled the body in. Looking good.


Today I used the hooks that I have in my garage ceiling along with the rope lock pulleys I’ve used for previous builds to lift the body, roll the chassis under, and drop the body into place. If you take your time, it’s possible to do this by yourself, which I did. Warning: Do not try this without the center cockpit brace!!! Also, I wouldn't do this with a painted body. But no qualms at all with the unpainted body.

Ready to go one. Note I put some beach towels around the door hinge area. You need to spread the body as it’s dropping into place, and this protects the body and the chassis.


Drop the nose and hook it around the frame.


Then lower the rest of the way. Spreading the center as you go and then pulling the back around the trunks sides.


I installed this time without any of the bulb seal or cushioning, looking for any aluminum that might need to be trimmed plus any other adjustments. I had to re-position the horns a little bit. They were tight up against the back of the DS brake cooling inlet. I need to trim a little more off the rear cockpit roll. Still a little tight there. The dash ends are tight. But I’m not going to do anything yet. With the firewall bulb seal, hood surround cushion, and front QJ bolts, I think it will lift a little and be OK. We’ll see. Everything else looks pretty good. But I’ll be able to tell more in the next round with the bulb seal and cushioning. Interesting this is my first build where the front frame pieces lined up. My other two I had to bump the DS over an inch or so. Not this time. Good. The wheels lined up in the wheel wells pretty good. Offsets look good too. My ride height is at least an inch too high still, so the gap along the top is more than it will be once everything is adjusted. The GP Headers are pointed right into the pipe openings. Nice.

The heat and humidity have been pretty bad, so I’ve cut down my hours a bit. Just get too wiped. Supposed to cool down or at least lose some of the humidity later this week. I hope so. You hot climate guys probably think I’m a wimp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #275 (Edited)
Body On Plus

In a previous update I mentioned I had taken my transmission cover to a local automotive upholstery shop to have some stitching sewn in the leather and then installed. Also had them do some stitching on the pockets of the door panels. Everything was done last week, just when promised (good place) and I have the pieces all done. Pretty happy with how they turned out.

This is the bottom of the transmission cover. After installing a patch and getting the shifter hole in the right location and installing a box for the ash try to fit into, I worked on a way to make the mounting hidden. After some thought, came up with a pretty simple solution. I riveted two aluminum 90-degree angle pieces that line up with the 3/4-inch tubes in the tunnel. I also made a sandwich of .090 and .040 aluminum to go along the front. The front engages into the lower bend of the front tunnel A-shaped piece, then I put two 1/4-bolts through the angle pieces and into the transmission tunnel cross pieces. I located the two bolts where they’re easily accessible from the bottom. I’m very pleased with how solid this holds the cover in place. And all hidden.

Once assembly was completed and before the leather was applied, I brushed on two coats of Lizard Skin sound and two coats of Lizard Skin heat on the bottom. I like Lizard Skin a lot, but I don’t like to leave it exposed. Works best when covered IMO, like with carpet, etc. I happened to be poking around on their website, and found they said the same thing. They have a top coat product now (their part number 30101) so gave that a try. It’s solvent based, vs. the water based Lizard Skin product, and is similar to typical undercoating spray. Here it is all done. Not too pretty, but in this case who cares?


This is a closer view of the two brackets and the front mounting.



And finally, with the good side up and what it looks like in the cockpit.


I also finished up the leather door panels. These are essentially copies of Herb’s door panels but made from the same leather hide as the dash and transmission cover. The upholstery shop stitched the pocket pieces and installed a piece of elastic. I stapled that in place with extra staples in the elastic band. Then glued and stapled a liner over that. I’m trying to have the mounting for these hidden as well. I had a little trouble with the Velcro Herb uses, so ended up with some finish screws through the panels on my last builds. (Maybe if my wife didn’t stuff those big water bottles in there…) Doing some more looking, I found a 3M product called Dual Lock. A little similar to Velcro except they’re molded from plastic and kind of snap together. 3M claims five times as strong as Velcro. They come in all different holding strengths and different adhesives. I picked a combination that seems would be strong enough and also has a high temp permanent adhesive. I put three pieces along the top and one in each corner. I wasn’t sure how it would stick to the Masonite, so wiped on some contact cement where they would go, let it mostly dry, and stuck it down. They’re also just thick enough to deal with the layers of leather on the back of the panels. I suspect they will be pretty hard to get off once I put them on the doors, but that’s OK. I’ve never had to get the other ones off. On purpose anyway.

Back of the two door panels:


One of the finished panels. Turned out pretty nice I think.


Tomorrow it’s back out into the sauna and will take off the body, make a few adjustments, put on the bulb seal and cushions, then back on. If all goes well, can start finalizing lots of things.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,146 Posts
The build looks great Paul.

How much dash cowl did you end up trimming?

And do you think 3M Dual Lock would be suitable for mounting a dash?


John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
The build looks great Paul.

How much dash cowl did you end up trimming?

And do you think 3M Dual Lock would be suitable for mounting a dash?


John
John, I tried my best to use the 3M super Velcro on the dash. I used four 1 1/2 inch pieces across the dash, but could not get self stick Velcro backing to stay stuck to the 3/4 inch frame.
My dash is the new composite dash that was shipped with the 20th Anniversary kits. It also incorporates a center section brace down to the tunnel top. In the end, I just bit the bullet and used three screws.
Also went ahead and used screws on the finishline door panels.
Will be interesting to see how Edwardb fares using the Velcro on the door panels.

rick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,861 Posts
Discussion Starter #278 (Edited)
The build looks great Paul.

How much dash cowl did you end up trimming?

And do you think 3M Dual Lock would be suitable for mounting a dash?

John
John, I tried my best to use the 3M super Velcro on the dash. I used four 1 1/2 inch pieces across the dash, but could not get self stick Velcro backing to stay stuck to the 3/4 inch frame.
My dash is the new composite dash that was shipped with the 20th Anniversary kits. It also incorporates a center section brace down to the tunnel top. In the end, I just bit the bullet and used three screws.
Also went ahead and used screws on the finishline door panels.
Will be interesting to see how Edwardb fares using the Velcro on the door panels.

rick
Just to be clear, the 3M Dual Lock is "Velcro like" in that it's a reclosable fastening material, but it's not Velcro or super Velcro. They are two different companies and the product itself is quite different. Instead of a hook and loop design, the 3M Dual Lock is a molded product with little "stems" that interlock. I chose 250 stems per inch, which is considered a medium hold, and the outdoor adhesive which is supposed to be good up to 200 degrees F. With the testing I did, I'm optimistic it's going to work well for the door panels. But the proof will be in the real world obviously. We'll see.

Would this be a good product for a dash? I'm probably not the best person to ask because I prefer a mechanical attachment for the dash. It's much heavier than the door panels. I know some guys use industrial strength Velcro and they're happy with it. From what I've seen working with it, this 3M Dual Lock would probably be an even better product. But my experience mirrors what's already been stated. The issue isn't with the reclosable pieces staying together but the adhesive permanently sticking to various substrates. Either when trying to remove, or just trying to hold up the dash.

To the other question about the dash cowl. I assume this is a follow-up to my comment about possible interference between the dash ends and the body based on my first body fitting. I have a couple updates. Today I removed the body, completed several adjustments, applied all the bulb seal and cushioning, and put the body back on. The good news is the dash ends are much better with the body in the right position. But I do still have a little interference. Turns out the issue is I tried to put nice gentle curves on the end of the dash, but overdid it. The radius is too large on both sides and they were hitting the underside of the step in the body where the door fits. I was able to fix the DS pretty easily by just tightening the radius of the bend and and the little bit of extra length went into the open area behind the dash in the that area. But the PS is a little more difficult because it's closed at the back with the little firewall piece. I'm going to need to either cut a bit off the end of the dash or put a small right angle bend right at the end. Then I can tighten the radius. I'll fix it the next time I take the body off.

One other thing. I mentioned in my last update that the front frame pieces were lining up OK. Turns out not so. I measured from the frame to the wheel lip on both sides (the proper way to make sure the body front is centered) and found that with the body centered the DS QJ mount interferes with the brake cooling duct on that side. So turns out the frame is slightly off just like my last two builds. A big hammer and a wood block bumps it over pretty easily. But need to unbolt a couple things first. Easy enough fix, but also need the body off.
 

·
Not a waxer
Joined
·
11,700 Posts
Coming along nicely Paul! Regarding the dash "wings' and curvature---I always end up taking 1 1/2" to 2" off of the passenger side. As you found out you're trying to pack more into the space than really wants to fit! I've gotten customer cars in that have not had this done and invariably the unhappy curve that it forces into the end of the dash hits the underside of the cowl pushing it upward which then makes the fit of cowl to door intersection even worse than usual. After cutting the dash so that it lays into the void above the hinges in a relaxed state things are much better :yes:

Cheers,
Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
Jeff,
Could you explain a little better the trimming the passenger side dash end?
Thanks Doug
 
261 - 280 of 501 Posts
Top