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Great, isn't it?
 

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Discussion Starter #223

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Discussion Starter #224 (Edited)
More Electrical

Couple cruises the last few days, so have lost some building time. Terrible sacrifice I know... The good news is I’ve now pretty much burned out all my treated winter gas and replaced with fresh. Good old #7750 is running great. Another event this Friday showing our cars at a local vocational school and interacting with the students. Good stuff. What did I do before when I had to work for a living? Anyway, on with the build.

I’ve been working on details getting the last of the electrical mostly finished. The last couple of days have been working on light fixtures. Wouldn’t be a big deal, but I’m doing LED lighting on everything, so some extra work there. First the headlights. I picked up an LED headlight setup from Watson’s Streetworks. They said it would fit right into the FF supplied buckets, and it does. The only thing is the added LED drivers which need to be mounted somewhere. The best seemed to be mounting them on the back of the buckets, so made up some brackets to match. Initially I used nuts and washers on the inside, but changed that to a disk with three tapped holes. Just seems better. The plastic those buckets are made out of is pretty soft.



This is with the LED drivers mounted. I had to use larger grommets to get the cables from the drivers to the fixtures. Also in this pic you can see I changed the 3-prong headlight connectors to Weather Packs. That 3-prong connector is normally inside the bucket. Outside I’m not sure it’s up to the elements, so switched them. It was kind of delicate surgery since the gauge of the wire in the LED lights is pretty small. But once I clipped off the connectors shown, I was pretty well committed. I pigtailed larger gauge wire to go to the Weather Packs that is crimped and soldered to the LED leads and then covered with shrink sleeve. Turned out OK, but in hindsight could have just put a big piece of shrink sleeve around the 3-prong connections. Oh well. It's done and do end up with one less connector in the circuits.


These are the actual headlight fixtures. Just playing with them in my basement they are BRIGHT. Huge difference from the standard sealed beam halogens. I measured the current draw and it’s only 1.8 amps per fixture on either high or low beam. Pretty amazing. A single halogen regularly trips the over current protector on the 12 amp power supply I use while building.


You can see they have little fans on each bulb. The back of this fan is about 3/4-inch from the back of the bucket. They don’t seem to get warm in the little bit of time I’ve run them on the bench. But I was still concerned that they would be OK in the headlight buckets without any additional ventilation other than what gets in around the front. I checked with Watson’s Streetworks and they said I didn’t need to do anything. They would be fine in the buckets as is.

Next up was the rear license plate mount and light. Here there are two things. One is the world famous Kleiner mod to fit the license plate between the mount and the trunk handle. The other is changing it over to LED lighting along with everything else. I was very fortunate that forum member carlewms posted a very nice solution to do both using LED license plate bolts from SuperBrightLED.com. Ordered the lights and wrapped it up this morning. Perfect! I only made one slight modification. I added some spacers under the lights so they stand up a little higher and get both elements projecting onto the plate a little better. Thanks Carl!

This is the modified fixture with the old removed parts on the left. Minor fabrication to make a new mounting bracket and drill a couple holes. Pretty easy. It’s all up high enough to clear the license plate.


Then cut the slot for the license plate in the clear lens. I still need to make the plate that attaches the license plate in the higher position, but I’m going to wait until I actually mount this on the trunk lid along with the handle. That way I can get the exact dimension and make sure the license plate clears.


Finally, cut down the pigtails on the other six exterior lights and installed Weather Packs. I have LED 1157’s for these fixtures as well, also from Watson's Streetworks. But I’m going to leave them in the wrappers and do the installation and all testing with the incandescents. No point in popping those expensive LED bulbs if I do something dumb. I also have solid state flashers that I’ll put in the fuse panel after everything is done and tested.


I’m in the process of adding grounds to the four corners of the chassis and finalizing the harnesses there. Mostly more Weather Packs. That will just about wrap up all the electrical stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #226
Can't wait to see the lights working!
Yea, I'm interested in seeing how they work once mounted on the car. But it's going to be a while. Watson's Streetworks has a comparison video on their website. It needs to be downloaded before viewing, but gives a good idea of the difference between this LED headlights and halogen lighting. The profile and sound of the car they're mounted in should seem familiar. :)

https://www.watsons-streetworks.com/image/data/25101LEDHeadlights.wmv
 

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Discussion Starter #228

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Thanks for Referring the Watson Web Site

Thanks for the listing the website ...

I am going to hold off on the headlights for now ... but I did manage to find some other stuff to replace some items.

Reminder Buzzer and Trunk/Engine Lights.

Thanks,

Carl
 

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Discussion Starter #230 (Edited)
Electrical Plus Other Updates

I’ve been pretty busy since the last update wrapping up the electrical wiring plus a number of other smaller details. The remaining wiring was mainly the external lighting for the body. Weather Packs were installed all around. Once again it’s really a luxury having #7750 sitting here to get lengths for the pigtails. One of the mods that I’ve done on all my builds was to add a ground on each corner. I saw this first on the Mk4build.com site a few years ago. The RF harness seemed a little sparse for ground connections, and this looked like a good idea. It’s pretty easy. In an appropriate location on each corner, I set a 10-32 rivnut. Then bolt the ground lug in place, and trace around it with a pencil. Then with a Dremel, grind the rivnut so it’s flush and remove the powder coat inside the pencil lines. The wire brush attachment on a Dremel does a nice job of removing powder coat without cutting up the metal underneath. Leaving a nice clean and flat surface. With the ground lug bolted back on, makes a solid ground connection. To wire, bring the RF ground wire to the ground lug. Then add two wires, one for each fixture. This accomplishes at least two things. First, a solid ground connection for the fixtures. Both to the RF harness and directly to the chassis. Second, it provides another ground connection for the RF harness itself. All good. During final assembly, I will encapsulate each of the ground wire bolts and lugs with electronics grade (non-corrosive) RTV.

Another small task for the rear lights is to get one of the light brown running light wires to each fixture. The harness only has one wire. I cut the light brown wire off close to the side of the chassis, cut the loose piece in half, and then spliced them back onto the harness. Now you have a wire for each fixture.

Here are the completed pigtails at the PS rear. Not too exciting. All four corners look similar. It would be easy enough to see from the wire colors, but I put a red dot on the connector that includes the brake light. I will have the brakes in the top fixture, turns signals in the bottom.


This is the same corner from the bottom, showing the added ground connection. All four are similar.


The new body mounts FF is now providing (first time I’ve used them) are handy to get the spacing for the front lights.



Here is where I placed the horns. Same location as I’ve used for the last builds. This is the first time I’ve had the FF horns. My basic kits before didn’t include them so I used horns from Harbor Freight. (Don’t laugh. They’re actually pretty decent, and the price is right.) These are loud and sound pretty good.


The RF harness box is handy to hold all the unused wiring stuff. Yep, this is what was removed from the RF and Coyote harness during installation. Some is normal because many wires are purposely provided too long. But some is also due to modifications on my part. Pretty crazy.


That’s it for electrical until the engine is in. A few hook-ups there, plus a few remaining minor items like the license plate light and trunk light. But the heavy lifting is done. Everything possible has been checked, and all working. Full disclosure, I did have one electrical problem. The Watson’s Streetworks headlight and turn signal alarm I mentioned previously was wired per their instructions. The headlight portion works fine. But the turn signal alarm didn’t. It works fine when only wired to the turn signals. But with the hazards added through the turn signals, it introduced some crazy backfeeding that it couldn’t handle. Indicator lights were flashing incorrectly, the backlighting on the gauges was flashing, etc. Played around with it for a while, but then just clipped the turn signal alarm leads. I’ll live without that added function. Everything else is solid.

On to a number of other smaller tasks. I re-bled the brakes, after removing and replacing the leaking CNC reservoir mentioned before. I was careful to plug the lines while removing during the changeover, but still thought it best to do the bleeding again just to be sure. I used the pressure method again with the CNC cap. Works great. Got a few bubbles out, but for the most part it was still good. Brakes should now be ready for driving.

I installed the steering column for hopefully the last time. I will need to swing it out of the way to get the Coyote installed, so don’t have the set screws on the upper and lower bearings tightened down yet. But otherwise it’s ready to go. The main thing was centering the rack and then centering the steering wheel. As in past builds, the adapter on the steering rack input shaft wasn’t exactly on the provided flat. Close though. Only about two splines away. I marked the right location and made a new pocket for the adapter set screw with a die grinder. Doesn’t take much. The adapter and set screw received a dose of Loctite and are installed.

Another task I hadn’t completed yet was torquing the rear CV axle nuts. I was waiting for the engine/trans/driveshaft to be installed, and then set it down on the wheels while torquing. But since I have the e-brake installed, thought I would try it with the e-brake set. Seemed to handle it quite easily. Per FFR instructions and confirmation found elsewhere by searching, the 2015 IRS axle nuts are set as follows: Torque Stage 1: 98 ft-lbs. (133 Nm). Torque Stage 2: Turn an additional 45°. Called Torque Turn to Tighten (TTT). No mention of Loctite, so none used. I followed the instructions exactly. It's a pretty good tug to get the 45°. Similar to the 250 ft-lbs pull on the front hubs. Whatever, they're tight. When I received my IRS pallet, I found that new axle nuts are supposed to be used for re-assembly. So I ordered new Ford CV6Z-3B477-A axle nuts before my kit was received, and those are the ones I used. The kit though came with new axle nuts. They are slightly different than the Ford ones, although I doubt it matters. I have a spare set that hopefully I won’t need any time soon.

Another thing on my list was the upgraded Koni shocks included with the 20th Anniversary kit. They are Koni 8212 series aluminum bodied externally double adjustable shocks. Very nice looking pieces, to say the least. However, no instructions were received or any recommendations about what settings to use. Searching on-line, I found the following adjustment instructions:
Rebound - Insert a pin into the slotted adjuster located at top eye. Moving the pin from left to right (counter - clockwise) will cause the forces to increase. From the minimum or factory position, there are 12 possible sweeps of adjustment (1 sweep equals 1/4 turn).
Compression - Insert a screwdriver into the lower adjustment device. Turning the screw driver from left to right (clockwise) will cause the forces to increase. From the factory or minimum position, there are 12 possible "clicks" of adjustment.
Since I will be doing mainly only street driving/cruising, I decided to start with each in the minimum position, same as the factory default. I did go around though and confirm all were at this setting. They were.

Yet another task on my list was to provide a locking method for the spinner adapters in the wheels. You don’t have to search very long on the forum to find owners who have had their spinners hang up in the adapters when trying to install or (worse yet) remove. I little bit of lube on the threads is good (I use a touch of anti-seize) but they still can hang up. Some glue the adapters into the wheels with silicone or whatever. However, I prefer a more mechanical positive lock. Set screws and drive pins are commonly used. On my last build, I used 3/4-inch long 10-24 set screws through the wheel hub into the adapters, so repeated the same thing here. It’s a little unnerving (to say the least) to drill and tap those shiny new wheels. But it worked out OK. With this method though I’m matching the adapter to the wheel, so they always need to stay together. My new tires aren’t directional, but the spinners are threaded differently from one side to the other. So now I’m locked in. For those of you new to this, for spinners and adapters, the right hand thread goes on the left side of the car, and the left hand thread goes on the right side of the car. When you tighten the spinner, the top should turn towards the back of the car (drivers side clockwise, passenger side counter clockwise).

First order of business is to get the spinner and adapter assembled confirming the adapter is exactly centered. I found with these wheels, the threads on the spinner and adapter bottomed out without the lug nut covers in place and was still slightly loose. So I made a ring out of .090 aluminum simulating the thickness of the lug nut cover to use while drilling and tapping for the set screw. I used some Gorilla tape to protect the wheel while I was working. Here I’m drilling the #25 hole for the 10-24 tap. 1/4-inch down from the edge seems to be about right. An air drive right angle drill works well:


Now tapping the 10-24 threads. I used plenty of cutting fluid and backed the tap out regularly to clear the chips. Not a place I wanted to break a tap! It's tapped all the way through the wheel and adapter.


With the hole tapped, installed the 10-24 set screws with a good dose of Loctite. Let them set overnight, and then took the spinners off and mounted the wheels on the chassis. Torqued the lug nuts to 85 ft-lbs and installed the covers and spinners. Another item off the list.

I still have some smaller tasks that I can complete. I just checked today, and my new TKO is “1-2 weeks away” from delivery. Cool! Then the engine goes in.
 

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The harness only has one wire. I cut the light brown wire off close to the side of the chassis, cut the loose piece in half, and then spliced them back onto the harness. Now you have a wire for each fixture.
A couple of follow up questions ... 1) Are using LED's with a high and low voltage setting for each bulb? 2) If so does the running or parking lights light the low or high voltage side of the LED?

Thanks for the excellent build threads ... they are part of my daily routine and reference.

Carl
 

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Discussion Starter #232 (Edited)
A couple of follow up questions ... 1) Are using LED's with a high and low voltage setting for each bulb? 2) If so does the running or parking lights light the low or high voltage side of the LED?

Thanks for the excellent build threads ... they are part of my daily routine and reference.

Carl
Thanks Carl. The 1157 LED bulbs I'm using plug directly into the provided light fixtures and are wired exactly the same as they would be for standard incandescent 1157 bulbs. So nothing different or special required. The light brown (or tan as I see the RF schematic calls it. Same difference...) wires power the lower intensity running or parking elements, and high intensity is used for brakes or turn signals depending on the fixture. Again, no difference whether LED or incandescent.

To illustrate, here is one of the Watson's Streetworks 1157 LED bulbs I'll be using next to a standard bulb. The base is the same and they plug into the provided fixtures. Other brand LED bulbs are the same. I have Jam Strait LED bulbs from O'Reilly in #7750 and they too plugged right in.


The only issue with LED lighting is if everything is changed over likely the standard flashers will no longer work. There isn't enough current draw. There's a couple ways this can be addressed. I'll be switching the standard flashers over to solid state ones, also from Watson's Streetworks. A side benefit of these is they appear to be sealed. I've had trouble with moisture getting into the standard ones since they aren't sealed and directly under the windshield post. Not a good combination.


Hope that answers your questions! :grin2:
 

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Thanks ...

I am actually using the InfinityBox system so the colors of the wires are a little different and I do not have to worry about changing to a digital flasher (it is all handled in the MasterCell of the system);

When I had initially wired in the rectangular lights with two LEDs I had the upper LED high intensity wired to the turn signal and the low intensity wired to the parking/running lights;
the lower LED high intensity wired to the brakes and the low intensity not even wired (I am not sure what I was thinking about :wink2::glare:.).

I sure like your arrangement better because it gives you more visibility for the running/parking lights. Thanks again.

Carl
 

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Discussion Starter #234 (Edited)
Gas Cap, Leather Dye, Grab Handle, Charcoal Filter

Details… that’s what I’ve been working on while waiting for my transmission and final engine installation. This is all stuff I want to get done on the build, and getting it done now means that much less when final assembly and body prep starts. All of these are versions of what I’ve done on previous builds.

First the gas cap. I sometimes attend indoor shows (Autorama, etc.) and these shows typically have a rule that you must have a locking gas cap. I think it’s a good idea anyway. I’ve not had good luck with the locking versions of the usual twist on caps. Didn’t seem to fit all that well or lock very securely. During my first build I discovered the aluminum locking cap that Mark sells at Breeze, his #35317. Nope, not cheap, but super high quality. It perfectly fits into the LeMans gas cap. Like it was made just for it. But it does replace the hose barb on the LeMans cap, so a little work is necessary. The new hose barb is the same 2-inch size as the previous, so no other changes required.

The FF supplied LeMans gas cap comes apart with six small screws in the base. The hose barb needs to be removed from the LeMans cap base, the hole enlarged to fit the new cap assembly, and holes drilled for the mounting screws. Here are before pics:



Here is the base ready for the new locking cap. This would be easy to do with a milling machine, but unfortunately I don’t have one. First I cut off the barb with a hack saw. Then cleaned up the cut-off with my disk sander. Then machined out the flange on the inside using a router table. All the woodworkers in the crowd will know what that is. I’ve found that a sharp carbide bit cuts aluminum very nicely if you take small cuts. So I cut about 1/16-inch off the flange at a time free-handing the piece face down on the router table. With most of the material removed, free-handed the final diameter, and cleaned up using a drum sander. It’s not terribly critical since the locking cap fills the hole, but still like to keep it clean. Then drilled the mounting holes and bolted in the cap using the supplied hardware and gasket. It’s necessary to take a few passes with a file around the circumference of the cap to fit perfectly into the radius at the bottom of the base.


Final product. I cleaned up the LeMans cap a bit before re-assembling. Is it just me, or have these gotten a little rougher over time? The outside is polished up OK, but the inside was pretty rough and the SS lid in the cap had an edge like a serrated knife. Anyway, all done and ready to mount when the time comes.



Another detail I like is to tone down the unfinished leather on the door straps and the Simpson lap harness. On my first build, I used black shoe polish, and it wasn’t bad. But another forum member several years ago talked about leather dye and related products from Fiebings. Much better. They are on Amazon and not expensive. Somehow is related to or also sold through Tandy Leather. These are the products I used.


They’re applied with a wool applicator and it’s very non-critical to use. First the dye. Then the edge coat on the exposed edges of the leather. Then the acrylic top coat. Just a hint. Do not spill the dye! It’s called stain for a reason. It’s instant and permanent. I just happen to know from my last build, with the evidence still on my workbench and floor. This time around, I used a drill press vise as training wheels to hold the bottles while open. Also wore nitrile disposable gloves.

Leather before:


Leather after. I like it. Gives a nice finished look to the interior when installed.


In previous updates I showed a dash grab handle. I’ve installed these on each of my builds. I like them because it helps people to stay off the doors and windshield while getting in and out of the car. But for me, it’s also a requirement for my wife. She needs the handle to get in and out because of her arthritis. But just bolting it to the dash isn’t very substantial. On my first build, I came up with a brace method down to the 2-inch dash tube and have now done it the same way several times. I located the glovebox with just enough room at the bottom for the handle and a 3/4 x 1/8-inch steel strip on the back of the dash. Then made small brackets cut from angle iron, and short braces from 3/4 x 1/8-inch steel strip that go from the handle mounting bolts to the brackets attached to the 2-inch dash tube with 5/16-inch nutserts.

Here’s the frame assembly ready to install. I used the powder coat matching LVP rattle can touch-up paint mentioned previously. The handle is from Eddie Marine, their part number 275-24P Grab Handle, Aluminum, Polished.


Installed, looking from under the dash. The handle is rock solid.


Finally, I’ve used charcoal filters on the gas tank vent line for each of my builds. This is to prevent gasoline odors in the garage. Some report no gasoline odors without a filter. Some report gasoline odors even with a filter. I only know I’ve used them on each of my builds and have never had any odors. For my first build, I used a Mustang charcoal filter with the purge valve disabled. They’re not particularly cheap and also not serviceable. Several years ago there were a bunch of forum posts about making your own using aquarium filter charcoal and various containers. Jeff Kleiner showed making a container from PVC pieces, which I patterned mine after. These are standard plumbing pieces from HD or Lowes and dirt cheap.

Here are all the pieces I used to make and mount the filter.


The mounting bracket isn’t necessary, but I like how it mounts the filter with hose clamps and looks somewhat professional. The three PVC pieces are the main body of the filter. The one I use is actually a 2-inch coupler, and then caps for each end with a 3/4-inch hole. One end gets the hose barb glued in for the vent hose, the other end is left open. Two circles of Scotch Brite go in each cap to keep the charcoal pieces inside. The charcoal is from the pet section at Walmart. I glue on one end cap and leave the other end loose. It’s a tight fit also held in place by the large hose clamp. Would be very easy to remove the assembly from the mounting bracket and put in new charcoal if necessary. I have this exact setup on #7750. No odor (yet) since it was first installed. The container of charcoal would probably fill 4-5 times.

Installed on the build. Pretty much unseen once the body and splash guard are installed. But still reachable for service if needed.


I have a few more small things to work on. Hoping to get the call for my finished transmission any day now.
 

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You know Paul, you have some awesome ideas in your build. I know it's been said before but your eye for detail is awesome. Thanks for the great ideas!
 

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Discussion Starter #236
You know Paul, you have some awesome ideas in your build. I know it's been said before but your eye for detail is awesome. Thanks for the great ideas!
Thank you and you're welcome. :laugh2:
 

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Awesome Job Ed

Ed fantastic attention to detail. Your car is going to be amazing!

Can you tell me how you sandwiched the 2 pieces of aluminum together to form the glove box door. The dash turned out like what I want to do.

Thanks for all the information you provide to us beginners.
 

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Discussion Starter #238 (Edited)
Ed fantastic attention to detail. Your car is going to be amazing!

Can you tell me how you sandwiched the 2 pieces of aluminum together to form the glove box door. The dash turned out like what I want to do.

Thanks for all the information you provide to us beginners.
Thanks, and you're welcome. I'm anxious for it to be done to see how it turns out. But also enjoy the build. So kind of mixed feelings...

For the glovebox door, I had to rack my brain a bit, but I remember now that I glued the two halves together. I used the Weldwood Landau contact cement around the edges where the wrapped around leather meets, and then some blobs of JB Weld at several locations inside of that. The latch adds a mechanical hold to the two halves at the top. The hinges at the bottom don't help hold the outer half, but the through bolts to the inner half carry the weight. So I'm confident everything should stay together.

Good luck with yours!
 

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Discussion Starter #240 (Edited)
Drivetrain Final Assembly Begins

This isn’t going to be much of an update. But have made a little progress starting final assembly on the drivetrain, so will share. I’m waiting for the call to pick up my TKO600, then it will get really serious. Promised for any day now. In the meantime, I started hanging parts on the back of the Coyote for what I hope is the final time.

I read through a bunch of posts, nearly all saying the stock nodular Coyote flywheel was just fine and use as is. But not being one to leave well enough alone, I still decided to go ahead and spring for the billet steel version. For my mainly street driving, no doubt massive overkill. But that’s what I did. Ford Racing now has a newer lightweight version, part number M-6375-M50, and that’s the one I used. At 20 pounds, it’s 9 pounds lighter than the standard billet flywheel and also SFI rated. The stock nodular flywheel weighs 29 pounds.

First order of business was to remove the stock flywheel, which I would have had to do anyway to install the Quicktime blockplate. In this picture you can see the Coyote crank position sensor and trigger wheel. Found some discussion about this maybe needing to be relearned once the engine is back together. But I didn’t disturb it and the wheel is keyed to the flywheel bolts so it can only go one way. By most accounts, it should be fine with no further actions. Notice also in this picture I moved the homemade engine lift bracket from the rear header location to the back of the head. Early in the build thread I showed the lift brackets I made since Ford no longer provides them or even has them available. For whatever reason, I didn't notice there were lift locations on the back of the PS head. This location is much better and also avoids the PS footbox during installation.


New flywheel in place. I had installed the clutch dowels before mounting here. The usual overnight in the freezer and they drove in pretty easily. I used new flywheel bolts, which is recommended. They aren’t expensive.


I chose to use the Ford Racing M-7560-T46 clutch, which is actually a Centerforce dual friction part. It’s no secret. The box, parts, and instructions say Centerforce all over them. By all accounts it’s a good clutch and is the one recommended in the FF Coyote installation instructions. This is the side of the clutch disk that goes against the flywheel. Kind of different.


Here the clutch disk is on the flywheel using the alignment tool. Not included with this clutch kit, BTW, but I had one on hand.


Clutch assembly complete. New bolts here as well. First time I've seen those counterbalances that Centerforce uses. Also kind of different.


Installed the TOB on the clutch arm and had the bell housing on and off a few times getting the clutch fork pivot ball adjusted to the right height. Once satisfied, locked it down with blue Loctite and a good grunt and put everything together. I’m using Mike Forte’s hydraulic clutch setup, so had previously bolted the pivot block on the end of the clutch arm. Also shot a little Eastwood chassis black on the exposed part of the arm and pivot. Just don’t like bare metal.


I can’t bolt it on until I have the transmission, but did a sanity check on the slave cylinder mounting block and pushrod. Looks like it’s going to line up perfectly. Like on my last build, I’m going to hook up the hydraulic line, bleed the system, and confirm proper operation of the hydraulic clutch before the engine is installed. Everything else looks like it’s lining up properly. Now just need to hang the transmission there.

Another detail I completed was the Tangent running lights that go into the front oil cooler opening. I’ve used those on each of my builds and like the look and they’re somewhat functional. They do add some lighting for nighttime driving. But mainly I think they make the car easier to see by others. The version they’re selling now is a study in laser cutting. I was going to get the base and brackets for the center SS grille powder coated. But decided just to clean them up and spray with the satin Eastwood Chassis Black I’ve been using for a bunch of other stuff. Then assembled, hooked up the wires, and it’s ready to go into the body.



The light fixtures each have a small 194 style miniature bulb and a high intensity fog lamp style bulb that light separately. I added a 2-way (high-off-low) switch on the dash next to the headlight switch, a relay tied to the headlight switch so they only work when the running lights or headlights are on, a relay for the fog lamps (too much for the switch) and then wiring out to the front of the car.

I’m working on the roll bars and will get those all fitted and ready to go. I’m installing the Tangent hidden mounts for those. But will stop as soon as the phone rings for the transmission.
 
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