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Discussion Starter #202 (Edited)
Wiring Update

Progress continues with the wiring. I have everything in place now. Just need to make all the necessary connections and (hopefully) wrap it up. In a previous update I showed the power wiring from the front mounted battery to the disconnect along with the Coyote power distribution box wiring. Now for the rest.

First was the Ron Francis harness. I made a number of mods to the harness as supplied to make it fit a little better plus integrate with the 2015 Coyote controls pack harness. I removed the 33 hot rod specific leg. After checking the required lengths, I shortened the headlight and ignition switch legs. This makes a big difference in how the harness fits. Each was about one foot too long for where I located the respective switches. I removed the blue solenoid start and clutch interlock wires since they’re not needed for the Coyote. The only blue wire remaining is direct from the ignition switch to the start sense wire in the Coyote harness. I removed the cooling fan power and sensor wires from the front harness. This is provided through the Coyote harness plus eliminates a connector from the already crowded front harness through the DS footbox. I’m going to use the cooling fan circuit in the RF harness to power the aux outlets under the dash. I eliminated the connector on the gauge sending unit leg. Since only three of the wires are required (tach, oil pressure, water temp) I connected them directly and added them to the alternator leg since they go to the same place on the engine. Finally I broke into the fuel pump circuit in the RF fuse box and added the connection to the Coyote harness. The power and control for the fuel pump comes from the Coyote PDB and PCM, but it uses the existing RF wiring harness to get the +12V back to the in-tank fuel pump. It also uses the existing RF relay and inertia switch.

The Coyote harness also needed a little massaging to install the behind the dash wiring a little better. Nearly all of the connections were on the DS footbox end, which is already really congested. So I stripped back all the wrap and insulation, moved things around some, and then re-wrapped. In the process, adjusted the lengths of the various connections (clutch switches, DBW, ODB, etc.) to more closely match the installation. On the other side of the firewall, I previously mentioned moving the blue starter wire from the PCM location to the PDB location so it could route to the starter along with the battery cable. I also broke out the cooling fan wire and then routed it through a new harness I made for the PS front which has wires for the Tangent driving lights that will be in the front oil cooler, same as my previous builds. In the process, added a wire to the cooling fan wire back to the dash so I can have an indicator light when the fan is running.

With that all done, installed the main RF harness into the chassis along with the fuse panel. I did the power wiring much like my last build. I used a Blue Seas Systems bus bar for the main power. I have an 8 gauge wire from the switched side of the master disconnect to the bus bar. Then the three main power wires from the RF harness are attached. These are the same three wires that are normally attached to a firewall solenoid instead making just a 6-8 inch trip to the bus bar. Then I added a Blue Seas Systems 150 amp fuse to the alternator circuit. Typically DD’s have a fusable link in the alternator circuit. In stock form the RF harness has no protection from an alternator failure. Not typically a problem, but still something I prefer to add.


Again like my last build, I’m using an American Autowire headlight control module. This module handles the current of the headlights and low/high beam switching along with providing a flash to pass function. These were discussed some on the forum a couple years ago. Unfortunately, due to some failures, they were taken off the market and are no longer available. The failures were traced to interference from analog MSD ignition boxes (good old MSD takes it on the chin again…) and I’ve never had any issues with the same headlight control module and digital MSD box in #7750. But just in case I picked up a couple spares while they were still available, and will use one of them on this build. Since the module needs direct battery voltage, it has a separate circuit breaker. So I made a mounting bracket for the control module, circuit breaker, and another circuit breaker for the Tangent driving lights. The bracket allows the harness legs to pass behind it. The two circuit breakers get their +12V from the main power bus bar. The rear harness can be seen just below the headlight module.


It’s not very pretty yet (probably never will be…) but this is how I’ve got the RF harness and the Coyote controls harness installed behind the dash. The connector at the top is from the Coyote harness. Still lots to do here to complete the point-to-point wiring and clean everything up.


The center dash brace also has quite a bit going on. Two auxiliary outlets, two switches for fuel pump and ignition, the previously shown Watson’s Streetworks headlight reminder and turn signal buzzer, and four relays. The relays use sense wires from the ignition and headlight switches for the headlight reminder, aux outlets, and running lights.


I ended up mounting the fuel pump inertia switch all the way over on the PS side firewall extension. It was just too crowded on the driver’s side. It’s relatively accessible behind the dash next to the glovebox. Barely visible in the LH side of the pic is the ODB connector that I'm installing on top of the 2x2 tube under the glovebox. Again just because it's crowded on the DS.


Finally, the DS footbox is 100% complete except for the flex line from the clutch MC to the slave. I’ll install that after the engine and trans are installed. All the wiring is installed including RF harness and fuse box, clutch and brake switches, front harness, DBW module, and RF and Coyote harness ground wires. The footbox is already narrowed from the stock version to provide space for the very wide Coyote engine. So this is a very busy place! But it’s all there now.


Late today I applied voltage and very carefully checked what's installed to date. So far everything is working as it should. I have power at all four corners where it’s supposed to be, and all the loose wires have power at all the right times. So far so good. That’s the update for wiring for now. Will be taking a few days break for an out of town trip, but back at it next week when I hope to get the chassis portion wrapped up and then start the instrument panel.

Couple of other parts updates. I’ve been going back and forth on what to do with the roll bar(s). I did a Breeze DS roll bar on my last build. The look is great. But for a couple of reasons I want to do dual roll bars on this build, and I just wasn’t sure I wanted to do the welding and finishing thing for two of the Breeze roll bars. Plus I already had the chrome DS roll bar that came with my kit, and they just don’t seem to be worth too much selling on the forum. So I went ahead and ordered/received a chrome PS FF roll bar. I had a parts credit with FF from the welding mishap (like I said before, they stepped up on that one) so it was a no-brainer to go ahead and go with the dual FF roll bars. On another note I happened to notice a little bit of brake fluid on the bottom of one of the CNC reservoirs. I cleaned it up thinking I had just gotten a little sloppy when filling them, but it was back a couple days later. Several more rounds and confirmed it was leaking. Just barely. Took a few days to form a small droplet along one side. But leaking is not an option on these, so called CNC. They were very nice and said to send it back and they would either repair or replace. Better now than when the build is done, so back it went. Finally, I ordered my TKO600 transmission and found it will be a few weeks longer than I expected for delivery. I’m doing the Liberty’s Performance modded version again like the last build (love it) but found they are very busy and a bit backed up. I have plenty to keep me busy so won’t affect the overall build schedule. But will keep me from putting the engine back in for a little while longer.

On a separate but related note, through the forum I met a local fellow car enthusiast who was interested in seeing my builds plus has a nice shiny new 2015 Mustang GT. So today, with the weather finally being very pleasant, we had an enjoyable visit. We spent some time looking at the new build and talking Factory Five for awhile. Then we took a fun cruise in #7750 (never gets old) and he let me drive his new Coyote powered Mustang. Very impressive. Whet my appetite for the Coyote in the Roadster, to say the least. I think it's going to have enough "go." Hey George! Great meeting you today.
 

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..... Coyote powered Mustang. Very impressive. Whet my appetite for the Coyote in the Roadster, to say the least. I think it's going to have enough "go.".....
You're going to love that engine. In fifth gear mine pulls from 800 RPM up without bucking. It's very smooth and at 3500 RPM the power from the beast starts to roar.
 

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Why not go with a T56? For what you are spending on the Liberty’s Performance TKO600 you'd have a readily-available 6spd capable of withstanding 700 tq and a wider range of gear selection.

http://www.tremec.com/menu.php?m=105
 

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Discussion Starter #205
Why not go with a T56? For what you are spending on the Liberty’s Performance TKO600 you'd have a readily-available 6spd capable of withstanding 700 tq and a wider range of gear selection.
I appreciate the suggestion, and it's not a bad idea. But quite a bit more expensive ($700) than even the modded TKO. Plus I already have all the other parts for the TKO installation -- Quicktime bell, hydraulic clutch setup, transmission mount, driveshaft, etc. I'm not going to start changing all that around. I've got plenty to work on and waiting for the trans isn't going to affect my overall build schedule.
 

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I hear you. Just wondering if there was anything better about that particular TKO600 you chose and if the T56 was a consideration. You're choice sounds pretty like a good one.

BTW, the Magnum XL comes with an SFI approved steel bellhousing so the total investment is a lot closer to the Liberty TKO, which is what lead me to go the T56 route myself when the time comes. I hear it is a much tighter fit though.

Anyway, loving your build. Be well.
 

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Discussion Starter #207
I hear you. Just wondering if there was anything better about that particular TKO600 you chose and if the T56 was a consideration. You're choice sounds pretty like a good one.

BTW, the Magnum XL comes with an SFI approved steel bellhousing so the total investment is a lot closer to the Liberty TKO, which is what lead me to go the T56 route myself when the time comes. I hear it is a much tighter fit though.

Anyway, loving your build. Be well.
To be honest, I never considered anything other than the TKO600. I have the Liberty modded TKO in my current Mk4, and it shifts perfectly. Something that apparently not everyone experiences with the TKO. It would probably be nice, but I've never felt the need for the 6th gear. Plus I too have seen the pics of how tight it is. I know about the built-in bell, but wouldn't be able to return the Quicktime I have already since it's been installed and bottom flange trimmed a bit.
Thanks for your comments though, and glad you are enjoying the build. I am too. :laugh2:
 

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Why not go with a T56? For what you are spending on the Liberty’s Performance TKO600 you'd have a readily-available 6spd capable of withstanding 700 tq and a wider range of gear selection.

Magnum XL 6-Speed Transmission
In my opinion, 6 speeds is overdrive overkill. I have a stock TKO600. Good for 600 FTLB torque. The Coyote torque in stock form with a tune is still a couple hundred below that. So unless you're planning some forced induction (and if thats the case you should have bought the Alluminator) the TKO600 is more than enough insurance. There are lots of threads out there bashing the stiff shifting of the TKO. That's because it doesn't feel like your wife's Miata. Again, IMO, the TKO600 shifts just fine straight from the factory with no mods required.

Pete
 

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You're going to love that engine. In fifth gear mine pulls from 800 RPM up without bucking. It's very smooth and at 3500 RPM the power from the beast starts to roar.
Just a comment....I first go carted my coyote a couple weeks ago. I've got a TKO 500 and 3.55 rear end. After putzing around the subdivision several times testing brakes and steering I finally started rowing the gears but gave very little gas. On my last pass I was cruising around 1000 rpm in 3rd gear and stepped on the gas for a few seconds!......Pulled hard and had the back end waggle a bit! Cant wait.....
First time I had ever driven a Coyote!
 

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Just a comment....I first go carted my coyote a couple weeks ago. I've got a TKO 500 and 3.55 rear end. After putzing around the subdivision several times testing brakes and steering I finally started rowing the gears but gave very little gas. On my last pass I was cruising around 1000 rpm in 3rd gear and stepped on the gas for a few seconds!......Pulled hard and had the back end waggle a bit! Cant wait.....
First time I had ever driven a Coyote!
The great thing about these Coyotes is they are very easy to, as you put it, PUTZ around town in at lower revs. But step into it and hold on as the revs go beyond 3,000 -3,500. This is where the engine really starts to build power. And it won't let off until the computer says "that's enough" at 7,000.
 

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Discussion Starter #211 (Edited)
Wiring Progress, Other Updates

Today I basically finished the behind the dash chassis wiring. Since I already posted the in-progress pictures, need to show the nearly finished status. Compared to some of the amazing and perfectly organized wiring I see from some of the builds, this is a little bit like spaghetti. Even with all the harness mods I did. But I’m not sure it could be too much different short of doing everything point-to-point with custom wiring vs. the somewhat universal harnesses. Plus the Coyote harness basically doubles the behind the dash busyness compared to #7750 Mk4. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

This is what it looks like now. Still a few loose wires to deal with once the dash is ready to go on. Specifically, the headlight controller, turn signal buzzer, two indicators and the HAAT wire from the Coyote harness that I’ll use for the clock and GPS. But everything else is there and checked out as far as I can. No smoke (yet). That ignition switch is an old spare that I used for checking stuff out. I’ll be using the FF one that’s already in the dash. Same for the headlight switch.


A little closer view of the center where most of the action is. The large connector at the center top is one of the main Coyote interfaces.


In addition to checking out all the circuits possible at this point, I also checked the Coyote wiring as much as I could. With the key on, the fuel pump starts. In the ignition start position, I have +12V on the blue wire at the starter. With the Coyote ignition sense circuit switch off (one of the switches on the center brace) the fuel pump doesn’t start and obviously there’s no voltage at the starter. Exactly what I would expect. Confirmed there is only voltage at the starter with the clutch bottom switch engaged, so the safety interlock is working. Also confirmed the top clutch switch doesn’t affect anything I’ve tested so far. The start and run circuits are active with or without the top clutch switch. At this point, everything appears to be working correctly. That’s good!

This is what’s behind the dash on the passenger side. Not too exciting, since the space is mostly taken up with the glovebox. You can see where I chose to put the ODB plug and the inertia switch. Harnesses include a new one for the front running lights, the wipers, and a footwell light. There’s one also on the driver’s side, and I have them on the courtesy light circuit. So they turn on with a twist of the headlight switch.


These gauges are the GPS speedo version, so need to place the antenna somewhere. Speedhut says it can be under the fiberglass, and with an unobstructed sky view as much as possible. Factory Five just had theirs stuck behind the dash near the top. Some guys are putting them in this general area or the nearby 3/4 inch tube, and apparently works OK. There’s plenty of cable. I was thinking about putting it on the top of the DS footbox, nearer to the front. That would get it out of the view of the windshield posts and frames. Not sure it’s necessary though.


Just a little while ago I set the dash in place along with the dash harness/connectors and marked where it should be placed to best match up with connectors on the main harness. Now just need to hook everything up including all the gauges, switches, indicators, etc. Then it should be able to go back and stay. Hopefully that will be my next update. At that point, wiring will be essentially done except for exterior lighting and a couple engine hookups.

Couple of other points of progress. I received the CNC triple reservoir back from CNC. Recall in my last update I mentioned that mine was very slightly leaking. They sent a shiny new one, total time less than two weeks. That includes the ride back and forth between California and Michigan. No complaints with that service. This one looks good. No signs of pinholes or porosity like the last one, although I will never know if that corner was really where it was leaking. This one has had fluid in it for a couple days and all is clean. So I suspect another build hiccup is history. I did replace the 12 screws on the top covers with 10-24 SS button heads. I noticed on #7750 that the generic slotted screws CNC uses get kind of a dull corrosion after a while. Can’t have that.


While everything is wide open, went ahead and mounted the wiper motor. I used the exact location, angle, etc. as #7750 sitting here in the garage. Nice luxury that. FF does supply a different mounting now. Instead of the padded U-shaped bracket (that requires a pad or spacer behind the motor) they now have a full circle padded clamp. Nice. My only complaint was it’s plated a funky yellow/green color and didn’t look too great. So I cleaned and sanded and gave it a coat of Eastwood Extreme Chassis Black. Looks much better now. Also since I completed the harness and wiring, did a quick electrical check. Two speeds plus park. Perfect! A lot of guys struggle to get this thing working right, especially the park function. Using the Lucas wiper switch and wired the way it’s shown, it works.


Also this week I had my shiny new BF Goodrich Rival S tires mounted and balanced. A little bit of drama with the valve stems. Factory Five no longer provides them with the wheels, and the tire store had an issue getting either standard or bolt-in stems to fit. Jay at FF knew exactly what valve stem to use (standard TR413 rubber pull-through) and gave me instructions to pass to the installer. Success! Installed them on the chassis. Will soon be a roller.




Finally, I made a small addition to my tool collection this week. I have decent lighting in my garage and workshop. But working behind the dash or under the car I frequently end up using a rechargeable flashlight or work light. I have been blessed with still nearly 20/20 distance vision. But close-up is on the clock, and hasn’t gotten better with time. So work nearly always includes using my readers, and lately seems the lighting is more important. I’ve seen where some guys use a head lamp. Saw this at my local tool store and just had to have one. It’s a MAXXEON WorkStar 620 Technician's Headlamp. Rechargeable and nice and bright. Less than $30. Works well. I recommend it.


Back to wiring, and lots of other things I’ll work on while waiting for my transmission and then engine install. Plus the weather really has seemed to have changed. So cruising time is also here.
 

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Cheers, my wife got a head light for me and I love it!
 

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Two free hands!
 

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I love your white and grey panels.
I would agree that a 6th gear is not needed in a car like this. You have a big engine in a very light car, you don't need to be really specific on what gear you are in. It's gonna go.

I think the coyote is a great fit for these. A rev happy engine should work great in this car. Low end torque is not needed here, let it sing.
Can't wait to hear what it's like.
 

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Discussion Starter #216 (Edited)
Instrument Panel Installed

Yesterday I finished wiring the back of the instrument panel, and with the help of my able assistant (my wife) the instrument panel is hung, wired, and checked out. Needless to say, another pretty big milestone in the build. I’ve checked 100% of the circuits, including all the lights, flashers, turn signals, etc. and all are working properly. I had a bit of a concern when the instrument panel was first powered up because the fuel gauge promptly swept to “full” even though the tank is bone dry. The factory default calibration is supposed to be the same ohm range as the Ford sender we typically use. I checked the calibration, and it wasn’t. It was at the lowest range, causing it to read full. Toggled over to the proper range, and it went to empty and I suspect is OK. Won’t know for sure until there’s gas in the tank.

My major work since the last update was wiring the back of the instrument panel. I posted this previously, but this is the “before” picture:


Now looks like this:


And a couple closer up:



Much like the harnesses in the chassis, not easy to make everything pretty. But I’m satisfied with how it turned out. It’s mildly concerning that if a gauge were to fail, it wouldn’t be too easy to get out. But even though this looks all wrapped up, I tried to use a little logic. All the main harness wires are at the bottom of the bundle. Those shouldn’t ever need to be disturbed. The two daisy chain harnesses from Speedhut (one for lighting only, the other for power and lighting) I added last and just placed them as best I could on top of the harness with some tie-wraps. It would be easy enough to clip the tie-wraps and get a gauge out if necessary.

I added Packard 56 style connectors (from DelCity) for the turn signal/hazard connections to the RT turn signal, and another Packard connector you can see at the top for the clock, GPS, fan indicator, and Coyote fault indicator. I used a Weather Pack connector for the headlight circuit to the American Autowire headlight controller mentioned previously. You can also see where I permanently mounted the pushbutton for the speedo along the bottom of the dash, the dimmer for the dash lights also along the bottom of the dash, and the pushbutton for the clock to the interior of the glovebox.

The three large connectors coming up next to the glovebox are of course the dash harness connectors from the RF harness. I cannot stress strongly enough to find the proper location for those connectors. After the main harness is installed in the chassis, test fit the instrument panel and find out where the dash harness connectors need to be to mate properly. Mark this location and hold it there while wiring the dash. There isn’t a lot of wiggle room with these connectors once you hang the dash. You need them to be in the right place.

I haven’t mentioned before in this build thread, but the majority of my connections are crimped with a good crimper (very important), have a light touch of solder, and covered with adhesive lined shrink sleeving. Often called dual wall. This is probably overkill, but I’m comfortable doing it and I’m quite confident these will be good connections for a long time. The merits (or not) of soldering is often debated, and I don’t want to start it here. I have the proper tools (Weller solder station), proper technique, and many years of experience. Going back to building Heathkits in college. OK, I really dated myself there, didn’t I? The only connections that aren’t soldered are the large gauge connectors with 360 degree crimps using the hydraulic crimper mentioned before, and Weather Pack connectors. I find those crimp perfectly with the right good crimper and proper technique. With the added second crimp on the seal (gently, don’t overdo it) I don’t add solder to those and generally don’t recommend it.

Here is a pic of all the wiring behind the dash with everything installed. This is by far the busiest view. It’s not too bad from the bottom, and the major components are (somewhat…) accessible. I really don’t want to think about taking the dash off again, but it would be completely possible as all the fasteners can be reached from the bottom and everything is on connectors.


This morning I snapped a couple pics of the installed dash. Nothing really to add. I’m very satisfied with how it turned out.



In my last update, I mentioned I was looking for a place to mount the Speedhut GPS antenna. I took 2bking’s suggestion and went with spot next to the windshield mounting on the PS. Fits perfectly there. I bundled the extra cable (it’s 15 feet long!) and tied if off above the glovebox. When I was checking the circuits on the instrument panel while working in the basement, I put the antenna next to the basement window and it acquired from a cold start in about 15 seconds. Since then, it acquires very quickly. I have the GPS keep alive wire powered all the time, so it should be nearly instant once the car is done and I'm satisfied the antenna should get good reception from this location.


Finally, just for grins, this morning I took a several second exposure of the cockpit with the dash and footwell lights on. It’s a little blurry, but you get the idea. Man I wish Speedhut would light the hands on the clock! My only negative about their gauges. You can also see the fuel gauge on full. This was before I corrected the calibration.


Next steps are to wrap up the wiring on the corners (Weather Packs, grounds, etc.) and electrical will be essentially finished.
 

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WOW!

I have to say; when I scroll through your photos I am in awe. :thumbup:

What a Great Job!
 

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"I’m very satisfied with how it turned out".

Even that is an understatement!

May have missed it, but in the above pics I noticed the brackets at the top of the dash; how did you hang the dash?
 

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May have missed it, but in the above pics I noticed the brackets at the top of the dash; how did you hang the dash?


I think I remember seeing somewhere that the tabs were mounted with Gorilla glue and they screw into rivnuts under the 3/4" tube.
 

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Discussion Starter #220 (Edited)
"I’m very satisfied with how it turned out".

Even that is an understatement!

May have missed it, but in the above pics I noticed the brackets at the top of the dash; how did you hang the dash?
I think I remember seeing somewhere that the tabs were mounted with Gorilla glue and they screw into rivnuts under the 3/4" tube.
The tabs were bolted onto the instrument panel before the covering was applied. They are hung on nut plates riveted to the underside of the 3/4 inch dash tube. I used JB Weld to get them held at the proper location, then riveted through. Back a couple pages in post #171 here: http://www.ffcars.com/forums/5242546-post171.html.
 
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