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Discussion Starter #1
Did anyone of the Southern persuasion make enough stops to/from DVSF to discover where we crossed the Grits & Sweet Tea line into the land of Spuds and Unsweetened Tea?

Just thought I would do a little research while it was still fresh in your minds.
 

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My guess is a line running east/west bisecting Kentucky and Virginia.

This sounds like a great Cobra outing. We could start in Knoxville and drive north on I-75 stopping at every exit. At each exit we'll find the nearest local diner (not a chain) and order "tea". We'll sip it and if it's sweet, get back on the interstate and go to the next exit. Repeat this until we find out where the North starts. Meanwhile, the Capital Area Cobra Club can get on I-95 somewhere north of DC and head south doing the same thing. The first stop where they get their tea sweet without asking will be the start of the South. We will then draw a line between where we found unsweetened tea and they found sweetened tea and declare that the new Mason-Dixon line.

Now about those grits. I'll confess to being a transplanted Yankee and there's not much that could drag me back north but grits are one thing that just won't sit with me. What's the difference between wet sand and grits? NOTHIN'!

I get a kick out of people telling me how good grits are. They all have their own way to eat them too. Some say you have to put melted butter on them, others say to use syrup, and others say to put gravy on them. Well if you have to put something good on them to mask the taste of the grits why not just eat the good stuff and throw the grits away? Better yet, why waste the grits? I'll bet they would make a great wheel polishing compound and if you dried them first they would make a great media for the blaster. Hey, come to think of it, isn't that why they're called grit blasters?

;) ;) ;)

Rick Williams
 

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Rick - I couldn't agree more on the grits! :D

I'm about 35-40 miles west of DC, and we're about 50-50 on the tea....some sweet, some not. Almost all will ask when you order. You can get grits around here at most any local diner or mom&pop greasy spoon type of place. I wouldn't say they're prevalent over spuds though.

I'm up for a cruise in the name of "research"! :D
 

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I think that the research for a true culinary dividing line must include scrapple as well. Not that they have to serve it, just that they know what you are talking about.


 

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Originally posted by StephenP:
I think that the research for a true culinary dividing line must include scrapple as well. Not that they have to serve it, just that they know what you are talking about.


OOH, OOH...I KNOW! Like I said in my earlier post, I'm a transplanted Yankee. I grew up in eastern PA and scrapple was one of the primary food groups in our house! Believe it or not, within the last year or two they've started selling scrapple at the grocery stores here in South Carolina.

Rick
 

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I use grits in my sand blaster!
Scrapple well a little mustard or syrup.....Oh wait there we go covering up the taste again!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If we can get a federal grant for the research, we'll revise the inspection criteria to include the Scrapple departure line......whatever Scrapple is.

Any excuse for a Road Trip.

Have a great July 4th. God Bless America!
 

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GRITS IS GOOD !! :D

All you damn yankees need to learn to eat GRITS, just a touch of butter a little salt and pepper.

Feed them taters to the hogs, and make more bacon.

Now we need to look into how far west that line runs, by the time you get out here to Colorado a state of total confusion exists. You find both sweet tea and unsweetened tea in the same place you find "bisquits grits and gravy", right beside french fries with sausage gravy for breakfast.

By the way how far north do you have to get before they don't know what "sorgum" is.


This does deserve some form of federal funding, our nation needs to know.
 

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Grits are the real deal. Just remember it was the northerners who gave us SPAM.

However the real dividing line should be if the place has brains on the menu. Now that makes my town the "Real South".


ben
 

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I guess I'm a rarity here, a Northerner that likes grits. (Butter and brown sugar)
I have no idea what scrapple is.
Sweetened tea is just disgusting. Maybe a little lemon.
What's Trump?
Do I hear Road Trip?
 

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I like grits with butter, and Ohio is officially a 'Northern' State. Also like my tea sweet with lemon.

So, who here knows what Georgian Bacon is?

Mark
 

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Hey Craig

I know what Sorgum is, makes good beer.(African Style) :D

As for Grits, mmmmmm
. in The Orange Free State they serve something similar for Breakfast, called "Mielie pap" with butter and syrup.

Tea caught me out when I got here from Africa, in like 3rd day in Greensboro of course I got sweet tea, next day they flew me to Baltimore, expecting sweet tea I took large gulp and the surprize on my face must have been priceless......cause I got a few laughs...

Count me in for a drive to find out>>>>>>>
 

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For those unfamiliar with scrapple here's a definition from Wikipedia:

Scrapple is a cornmeal pudding in which the cornmeal, perhaps with the addition of buckwheat, is simmered with pork scraps and trimmings, then cooled and hardened into a loaf. It is particularly popular in eastern Pennsylvania, including the vicinity of Philadelphia. Scrapple is somewhat similar to the Scottish traditional dish haggis.
From what I understand it's made with the stuff that isn't good enough to make it into head cheese. :eek: :D
 

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Fred's definition is OK but here's the real deal on scrapple from someone who ate it about twice a week with breakfast when I was growing up. It is very peculiar in that it is a very regional food. I'd guess that most people haven't heard of it if they grew up west of the PA mountains, south of DC, north of Wilkes-Barre, or east of about central Jersey. Delaware, where my parents and wife's family are from, is probably the biggest scrapple state. Yeah, it's common in eastern PA but I'll bet if you measured per capita consumption as a state, Delaware has everyone beat. Those of you that eat the stuff and live outside of these boundaries, correct me if I'm wrong. For those within the region, scrapple is as common as sausage or bacon.

Scrapple is essentially sausage without the skin. The German immigrants and in particular the Amish have been making it since the colonial days. Originally, it was made with stuff from the hog that was left over after butchering. Once the hamhocks, bacon, pork, ribs, etc. were cut there were lots of "scraps" on the floor. They were scooped up and became scrapple. Just like sausage, it was everything from the pig but the squeal. The junk was ground up, mixed with cornmeal, spices were added, and then it was pressed into loaves. When you wanted some you sliced it off like a slice of bread and fried the slice.

Today's scrapple is a bit cleaner than days gone by but just as good. I gotta tell you, I love the stuff. Fried so it's crisp on the outside but still meaty on the inside, it's delicious. Nothing goes better with scrambled eggs than two fried slabs of scrapple, some home fries (NOT GRITS), and a couple of slices of buttered toast. Wow, gotta go. My mouth is watering.

Edit: Moderators...Sorry about being so off topic. Is there a way to move this thread to the off-topic forum?

Rick
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So basically, Scrapple is "pig scraps" held together with corn meal.

My favoriate from Grandmother Deal's was Souse Meat. Lovely pork dish... made with scraps, pepper, vinegar and enough fat/gelatin to hold it together.

So if there is sufficient interest in a Road Trip, I'll see if I can get some federal funding and we'll go from there.

Thanks yall and God Bless America....again!
 

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As long as we are OT let me take this Way OT! I have a jar of pickled pig lips in the pantry, can anyone top that? Actually I had never heard of pickled pig lips before, then a friend of mine from Louisiana told me about them and I had to have him bring me back a jar. I don’t plan on eating them, but they are great for shock value. You should have seen me chasing my muslim friend around the office with the jar…

Bud Gordon
 
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