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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a lot of groping Sunday, I was able to get the fuel gauge out far enough so I could get a test meter on the leads. I've got about a half a tank of gas in it and my test meter was reading 19.2 OHMS and the gauge shows less than E. Sooo.. it looks like I'm going to have to drop my fuel tank to change the fuel level sender. I'm going to try to run it a bit more to get the fuel level down a little more. Other than keep a good fire extinguisher handy, is there anything I need to know before I take this on? Does anybody have any hints or secrets that would make this a little less daunting of a job? Can I do this alone or should I have help? I would love to here from anybody that's actually done this. Thanks
Frank
 

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I recently put in a new pump & sender in FFR 2777, cut access holes thru the trunk floor with a nibbler, made up a couple of flat aluminum covers plates & done without dropping the tank...made a daunting task rather easy & under the carpet you never see it. Have to grope around the cross bracing a little. Hope this helps!
 

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Just use a floor jack with blocks or boards. You have to disconnect the filler hose. I did it last winter and it was about a 2 on the difficulty scale...10 being the hardest. It's one of those jobs that looks harder than it really is. The emptier the tank the better. Good luck
 

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FFCobra Master Craftsman FFR-4618
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It can be done by your self, I also did like snakebit99 did and cut holes in the trunk floor which would make it easier if the tank is full. I just changed out my sender the other day and I had to drop the tank any way to do some other work but was real easy using a floor jack and some boards.
Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Snake, If I had been as smart as some other guys I would have gone ahead and cut that hatch when I built it. Good suggestion though.
Knight, did you let the tank sit right on the jack or try to balance it on a board when you let it down?
Frank
 

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Cobra Builder/Driver
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Empty tanks are more dangerous than full tanks, but you really do not have much of a choice. A full tank is hard to manage if you are soloing.

Move the car outside, preferably on a windy day. Ground your tools (touch)to the tank first, away from the inlet/sender area, then use them.

I put my car up on jack stands and used a piece of plywood on the floor jack to lower the tank. I've done it with the tank half full and also empty, no big deal. Just take your time and be careful.
 

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Whatever you do, don't use a regular old drop light with an incandescent bulb. Florescent lights much safer. Know a guy that burned down his entire garage (body shop). Dropped gas tank - a little slosh came out. Then his drop light hit the floor. All it takes is a little spark...
 

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In the Navy I was on an aircraft carrier and a guy was cleaning the bilges on a liberty boat - which is a 60ft wood boat - when he dropped a drop light which broke and set the boat on fire. This was 1000 miles at sea and the boat was in a cradle in hanger bay 3. They announced fire and all hands provide. It was totally destroyed but we saved our home....the ship and aircraft.
I agree....do it outside...In the rain? maybe?
Bill Rodman
 

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..."Other than keep a good fire extinguisher handy,"...

Maybe keep 2 fire extinguishers handy
 

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I thought I had posted - anyway look at a pair of little rachet straps under the tank. I used them to install my tank- before aluminum - but I am sure there is a place you could catch the frame to keep it balanced and prevent from falling.

 

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FFCobra Master Craftsman
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I hosed down the ground, the tools I was using, and the underside of the car to prevent sparks. I also used stacks of wood (4x4, 6x6, 2x4) on either side of the lifting jack (put a wet rag over the jack too). I'd drop the tank a few inches till it rested and stabilized on the adjacent stacks of wood. Then, I pulled out some wood from the stacks, lower the jack, and repeated till it was down.

From what I understand - and from a few bad experiences with gasoline - you won't have time to reach for the fire extinguisher if something goes wrong so be super careful. You might want to enlist someone to stand by - at about 30 feet - with a garden hose and a cell phone.

For syphoning, I inserted about 3 feet of standard garden hose into the tank neck to get past the filler neck's sharp curves. Then I used the limpest 1/4 inch tubing I could find - it came from one of those $1.98 hand squeeze syphoning kits on the end rack at most auto parts stores (these kits don't work as designed, by the way). I inserted the limp tube into the garden hose and down into the tank then syphoned. This tubing was so limp that it wouldn't curl and just laid on the bottom of the tank. It worked well because by the time I was done syphoning, I only had about 2 cups of gas in the tank.

Also, I used flashlights instead of anything electrical and vented the area with a box fan from across the garage.

This job is probably the most dangerous thing to do on a car and a lot of people have been lucky not to blow up themselves, their car, or their garage - then again others weren't so lucky. I don't mean to sound too many alarms but don't underestimate the risk here.
 
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