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Unconventional Builder
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Drilling in frame and suspension mounting points is not my strength. I will be installing Gordon Levy's front upper and lower control arms. To do so requires I drill new 5/8" mounting holes one inch below the current lower control arm mounting points.

To me I dont see the clearance to do the front mounts with out removing the radiator and I also dont think my electric drill is going to cut it. My drill seems too fat (diameter) that I wont be able to drill the needed hole between the current one and frame tube, especially the 2nd hole parallel to the first one on the other side of the frame tab.

Is there an electric drill that has a body diameter about the same as a chuck?

Or do I need to purchase an air drill like this:
Great deal on Ingersoll-Rand 7807R at ToolTopia.com

Thanks
 

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I don't know of any 5/8 drill that has a 3/8 shank. Also that drill being an air drill does not have a lot of power and a 5/8 hole is a good size hole. You could work your way up in drill sizes so you not taking the hole out all at once but either way that drill you have pictured is going to have a tough time doing the job.

I have a big Dewalt right angle drill that will twist your arm off before it bogs down. Don't know if it will fit but your not to far from me. I travel over your way often for work also if you need it. Here is the drill it's a Dewalt dw124. The black handle and pipe in the side are removable to make the "head" smaller to fit in tight spaces.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-1-2-in-Stud-and-Joist-Drill-DW124/203070249
 

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Unconventional Builder
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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If it looks like this one then yes it could work. I know the one in the pic is a battery powered unit.

Factory Reconditioned Dewalt DCD740BR 20V MAX Cordless Lithium-Ion 3-8 in. Right Angle Drill Driver (Bare Tool)
Nope way bigger than that. I think you are going to need a 1/2 chuck to power a 5/8 drill bit. Mine is corded but has picked me up off the ground when it has bound up. You really have to be careful I have seen it through guys off a ladder and break fingers with it.
 
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FFCobra Captain
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Get some step bits. Start with a small bit that will go up to 1/2". Then put in a larger one to get up to the 5/8 hole.

Buy a few packs at harbor freight in case they go full on you.


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I would start with a 1/8" bit and work my way to the 5/8" less change of drifting.
This is a project where you want it to be dead on.

Dwight
 

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What Dan Babb said. Get a couple of step bits from HF. Lots of lubrication helps.
The step bits will be a big help when you are drilling holes for the windshield mounts, too.
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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All my regular bits up to 1/2 inch are constant diameter. My 9/16 and 5/8s are both 1/2 inch at the chuck end.
 

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Step Bits

Not a fan of Harbor Freight for drill bits but for just a couple of holes I'm sure it will be fine. One thing to look for in step bits is to get one with two flutes as apposed to a single. Two flutes give a cleaner cut and keep the hole from drifting.

Notice two cutting surfaces



Single cutting version


What Dan Babb said. Get a couple of step bits from HF. Lots of lubrication helps.
The step bits will be a big help when you are drilling holes for the windshield mounts, too.
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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I have never tried a step bit in 3/16 steel but they sure are worth a try. A big advantage in this situation is that they are maybe 1/3 the length of a standard 5/8.
 

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FFCobra Captain
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I have never tried a step bit in 3/16 steel but they sure are worth a try. A big advantage in this situation is that they are maybe 1/3 the length of a standard 5/8.
If you run it slow enough and take your time, they work fine. The HF ones have two flutes and you can use a grinder to sharpen it up again if you run it dull. But they're cheap enough to buy a few packs. Step bits are one of the better products sold at HF. Their regular drill bits are a bit flimsy, but good enough for disposables.

In 3/16" steel, they might not have a deep enough 'step' to make a 5/8" hole (before the next size hole starts cutting), but you can get it up where you start the 5/8" hole size then switch to a regular bit to finish it off.
 

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Unconventional Builder
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
In 3/16" steel, they might not have a deep enough 'step' to make a 5/8" hole (before the next size hole starts cutting), but you can get it up where you start the 5/8" hole size then switch to a regular bit to finish it off.
That is the plan :grin2:
 

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A Dremel with a HS bit will actually cut 3/16 plate steel quite easily. You could start with a 1/4" pilot hole, enlarge with the Dremel and then finish with a 5/8" std or stepped bit. The Dremel is also easy to control and allows you move the hole slightly if needed. Just a thought. Scott

FWIW, all of my suspension rides on 5/8" hardware and rod ends. It's a great upgrade. Really lets the suspension do it's job.
 

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What Dan and others said about the mulit-diameter (or Step Drills) tools. They come in several sizes and all have smaller shank diameters than regular twist drills. Be sure that you know which "Step" on the tool diameter is the 5/8 inch that you want as a finish hole size as the tool can cut oversize very quickly (don't ask !!). As mentioned, this is a tool supplied by H/F that is really up to the job, and can be recommended.

Dave
 

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Hey Joe,
I have Gordons arms on my MK1, I got them second hand and just bolted them in the original holes. How did you know that you need to mount them lower? I was able to align the car without issue, although I have never checked bump steer. Just curious if I missed something critical. Thanks in advance.

Mike
 

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Unconventional Builder
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hey Joe,
I have Gordons arms on my MK1, I got them second hand and just bolted them in the original holes. How did you know that you need to mount them lower? I was able to align the car without issue, although I have never checked bump steer. Just curious if I missed something critical. Thanks in advance.

Mike
Per Gordon, for optimal geometry move the lower mounts down about an an inch and may have to move upper shock mount for proper spring clearances. It has to do with optimal roll center. I am just beginning my research/learning about all of this.
 

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If you run it slow enough and take your time, they work fine. The HF ones have two flutes and you can use a grinder to sharpen it up again if you run it dull. But they're cheap enough to buy a few packs. Step bits are one of the better products sold at HF. Their regular drill bits are a bit flimsy, but good enough for disposables..
+1 Used one set & they will still cut without a problem. One of the few things I liked from them.
 

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Be sure that you know which "Step" on the tool diameter is the 5/8 inch that you want as a finish hole size as the tool can cut oversize very quickly (don't ask !!).

Dave
Mark the step bit with a Sharpie before drilling. This makes it easier to see when to stop.
 

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There are a couple of things that lower in the car does, specifically when running really low ride heights is it keeps the arms level and with the comp ball joints the neg camber gain is optimized.
 
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