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Senior Charter Member
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1,406 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Well, here's an update. I went to Grainger and got the Ridgid tool, 345DL. Visual inspection reveals that it's a much better-made tool than the KD.

Speaking of the KD, I found out why all my flares are lopsided. The reliefs in the KD's tubing clamp that hold the tube were actually cut crooked. You can see it just by looking carefully at it. They hold the tube about 5 off of perpendicular to the clamp. Stay away!

Anyway, the Ridgid makes beautiful single flares, but like so many others have complained about, it slips when trying to make the first flare of a double flare.

I cleaned the tubing clamp with brake cleaner, cleaned the tube with brake cleaner, cut the tube square, reamed out the inside, put about a 45 degree chamfer on the outside of the tube, and used a dab of oil on the double flaring "puck". It squishes the chamfer a little bit, and then slips all the way down. I'm not giving up yet, though.

Thanks for those links Roscoe. I was planning on using stainless tube. The steel tube was easier to get to practice on.

Phil, are there any non-mail-order chains (NAPA, etc.) that carry the Old Forge tool? I'm tired of mail-order.

Mark, the big 60 degree chamfer is an interesting idea. I'll try that.

If all else fails, I may do something drastic. I'm sure the Ridgid will work great if I could just get more clamping force on the tube. When I place a piece of tube in the clamp, the two sides of the clamp touch each other with just a minimal amount of clamping force. I want all of the clamping force to be concentrated at the tube, so I may take the tube clamp to a machine shop and get 1/64" milled off of each inside side of the clamp. Interesting, eh?
 

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918 Posts
With a $100.000 CNC machine. The people that do our brake line kits also make brake lines for,Ford,Chys,GM and other manufactuers.In order to even get the lines from these guys we need to buy over 100 lines at a time. ;)
 

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Junior Charter Member
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33 Posts
Lee,
A chamfer is nothing more that adding a bevel or angle to a sharp corner. (machists/tool & die gragon). As noted in my earlier post, by adding a 60 degree chamfer, this reduces the material thickness right at the end of the tube. This reduction will ease the initial problems many have with gripping the tube, folding the material inward for the start of the double flare process.
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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784 Posts
Cobra 3657

There a couple of autoparts store locally that have them here. When you on a road trip stop and check yours out locally..Havent looked at napa, but 3 good suppliers to local repair shops all had them for the same reason I stated above.

Phil
 
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