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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, many of you saw my post on wanting to build a Cobra for profit. THANK YOU for all the input, especially DOUG. We have narrowed down how and what we want to do. At this point we are 90% certain about going with a donor FFR kit and ordering a pallet. Total cost of car will be around $25,000. Our second place option is Hurricane, Shell Valley, or Lone Star Classics (since we're from Texas) complete kit. Going that route we'd have closer to $30,000 in the car. Now, I know this is gonna be hard for many of you, but I'm going to ask you to take off your "builder hats" and pretend for one second that you are nothing more than a partially educated consumer who has a greater appreciation for cars than knowledge thereof. I need to know, AS A BUYER, which method you think would bring more cash. My concern here is that some buyers might not like the idea of a rebuilt engine. But, because of the chassis, the FFR doesn't rely on fiberglass to support anything so there isn't as much worry about stressing. In the end, we want to go with the car that makes the most profit MARGIN. Thank you for your help. And, for those of you who think I'm crazy for trying to make a profit, simply leave your contact information so I can add it to the list of people I will contact once we've proven you wrong. lol Thanks!
 

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master craftsman
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5,597 Posts
The Hurricane should be cheaper than the FFR by alot!!!!!!!
 

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Junior Charter Member
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181 Posts
You can buy a nice crate motor, with a warranty, for around the cost of rebuilding a worn out motor. Check out a Summit or Jegs catalog for crate motors. As for suspension parts, depending on what you're going to be building, all you may need is a 8.8" center section if you were to do an IRS with knock-offs. Then all you're left with is a radiator, which you would probably get new anyway and a pedal box.

So, yes I think all new parts will look better to your prospective buyer, and if properly sourced, the prices are not that bad.

Best of luck,

P.S. as you've done your homework with SB, do your homework with the other companies you've mentioned, and I believe you'll find that you'll see that like with everything else in life, you get what you pay for- FFR is a GREAT car and a great company to deal with.
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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6,103 Posts
I wish you the best of luck. However, I must say, 'Making the most profit margin' is generally not considered the best business strategy in the long run. You will make more money selling a good product for a reasonable price - a product you can believe in and stand behind. Pick you target market and build to it.

Again, I wish you all the best.
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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6,103 Posts
I wish you the best of luck. However, I must say, 'Making the most profit margin' is generally not considered the best business strategy in the long run. You will make more money selling a good product for a reasonable price - a product you can believe in and stand behind. Pick you target market and build to it.

Again, I wish you all the best.
 

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Premium Member
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Originally posted by KC Wildcat:
I wish you the best of luck. However, I must say, 'Making the most profit margin' is generally not considered the best business strategy in the long run. You will make more money selling a good product for a reasonable price - a product you can believe in and stand behind.

On this point, I cannot agree more.

FFR sells more Cobra kits than all the other suppliers combined. They are a model of success in the Kit Car Industry. They also happen to have the smallest margins on their kits. And... the best cuatomer support of any manufacturer.

FFR did not become successful by focusing on the largest profit margins. By contrast, they operated on a shoe string for several years to allow them time to build a positive reputation amongst their customers for providing the best VALUE in the industry.

If you want to be successful, focus on providing the best bang for the buck to your customers with excellent customer support, and success will follow.

Focus on maximizing profit margins and you will be gone in a year.

Kerry
 

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master craftsman
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I think you may have misunderstood the " most profit margine" statement he made. I believe he's actually asking what would you want in a car? If he went with live axle and got $30,000 it may not actually have as good a profit margine as a irs, which would cost him $2500 or so but might be an easier and more prfitable sell at $35.000.........Steven
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Steve is right, most of you missed the point I was making about margin. Just because you want a higher margin doesn't mean you're money hungry or intending on building a POS. I believe all of my options to be good cars in their own right. I am attempting to make a "fine-tuning" decision. Let me expand the thought. If we build the FFR donor for $25 and get $28, that is better than building a complete kit Shell Valley for $30 and getting $32. I hope that helps. Basically, I'm asking if you were in my shoes, which route would you take?
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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24,722 Posts
Yeah,we are all biased here but....the facts are this-FFR has BY FAR the best rep in the replica cobra industry so I'd just forget all the other options. Can't tell you all the posts I've read here where some bystander walks up to a guy w/ a 'roadster' and asks, "Is that a Factroy Five?"
 

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It's a car!
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173 Posts
One word. Warranty.

You're right about most of us here wondering why you would buy a car when you could build one. But in truth, this is a niche group.

Still, your potential buyer is probably not torn between a Cobra and a Camry. But they'll probably want to know they have some recourse if the car they spend $30,000.00 doesn't start or move on its own the following week.

I don't think you need to offer anything like a 3/36. I just think a well worded statement covering major, non-abuse trouble would be well received.

Best of luck, and I hope you succeed. Seems like a dream business to me.
 

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Senior Charter Member
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710 Posts
To put in my two cents. I think crate motor sounds better than rebuilt to the less educated consumer, which seems like your target market. I agree with most everyone else, building your rep is the best first step you can take. People with big wallets (and maybe small brains) like shiny new stuff that works well out of the box. The guy buying from you is going to want bling for his buck and speed.
 

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FFCobra Captain
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11,720 Posts
I think you'd get more if you could say the car was built with all new parts.

Why not get the New FFR kit for around 20K with all new parts except the engine/trans/wheels.

Then you can build the car and sell it like a turnkey minus (like www.backdraftracing.com) and let the customer pick his powertrain. Most people like the classic 15" wheels, so you can have those ready to go.

The customer picks his powerplant and gets a motor/trans with a warrantee.

If you want to have the car ready to go, put a 302 or 351 based carbed motor in it and you can have a car with more power than most people can handle.

I think for resale, you'd probably get more lookers if you had a carb or the mass-flo setup (but that's more money). A lot of people really like the classic look.

You're really going after the non-builder guy with money to burn and those guys would probably be more attracted to the words NEW & WARRANTEE in your ad.
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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I am glad you clarified the profit margin point as there are many ways to view profits (percentage, gross, etc.) I do not think there are many people on here who are qualified to answer your questiton as to do so they would have to have built at least of the other kits. So pretty much any answer is going to be a totally subjective opinion.
 

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Charter Member
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Another thing you need to address:
* some want a pure street car,
* some a car for the street that they also can track,
* some want a track car that can be driven on the street,
* a few want a pure track car.
Which market will you focus on? They are each different and pose unique challenges to building and marketing, not to mention warrantee.

Robert
 
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