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Check out this link that discusses distributor/cam shaft gearing about half way in the article.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
got a cast and a melonized gear from comp cam. The funny thing is the gear look exactly like the Mallory gear. Even the same "S" mark on the side is exactly the same....but twice the price.

Other than running a normal pump, changing the distributor gear, cleaning the block, and rechecking the play on those parts mentioned I am not sure there is not much that I can do to avoid having to check my gear every 2000 miles.


Check out this link that discusses distributor/cam shaft gearing about half way in the article.
 

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Discussion Starter #25

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As long as you are pulling the engine apart to clean and reassemble everything, before you put the front cover / pan back on (removed for cam replacement), install the oil pump with the drive shaft installed and check for binding at the bottom of the dizzy lower shaft bore. Also make sure you are using the correct drive shaft for your engine configuration. There has been some discussion about the beefed up shafts being longer and maybe causing binding issues. Also, throw the manifold on and set the dizzy in place. See if there is a binding issue. IF everything checks out, pull it all apart and do your final re-assembly of the engine.

Doc
 
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Discussion Starter #27
Well Doc you are right. Just tore out the bottom of the engine and when I grabbed the oil pump drive shaft I knew what I did wrong. I had it upside down. The ARP shaft ends have two different length ends so if you get it wrong it pushed the whole tamale up into the cam gear. stupid stupid stupid. I need more patience.

btw This wasn't just slow wearing down effect. It ripped the teeth off. Almost all the metal that I could find was in the front sump. Nothing in the pick up or the pump. Since it was 5 mile oil.( because I literally only got 5 miles down the road) it was very clear where all the metal frags were. Gonna flush out out the rest of the motor and rebuild.

-Jim
As long as you are pulling the engine apart to clean and reassemble everything, before you put the front cover / pan back on (removed for cam replacement), install the oil pump with the drive shaft installed and check for binding at the bottom of the dizzy lower shaft bore. Also make sure you are using the correct drive shaft for your engine configuration. There has been some discussion about the beefed up shafts being longer and maybe causing binding issues. Also, throw the manifold on and set the dizzy in place. See if there is a binding issue. IF everything checks out, pull it all apart and do your final re-assembly of the engine.

Doc
 

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Too bad the vendor (ARP) doesn't provide a picture of the installation orientation . . . I have seen [HD] pump shafts that are cut with little or no clearance many times and most engine builders won't bother to blueprint everything when assembling "non-factory matched" parts. I learned that lesson very early in my engine building days (unfortunately). Since then, I have always verified pump shaft length for the engine I'm building, distributor gear placement, especially if replacing a gear for cam compatibility, and gear clearance to block guide boss for dizzy. Blueprinting isn't just bearing clearances and balance weights . . . Too many things can go wrong when we mix-n-match parts from different manufacturers, and while they say "their parts are compatible", some aren't so compatible.

Glad you figured it out and know what it will take to put together a "bullet-proof" engine for your car.

Doc
 

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Discussion Starter #29
ACtually Doc.... They did and there is a star washer to prevent it from getting pull up with the distributor.

This literally is my impatience and karma. I probably should have stopped when my wife dropped the wrench on my face second time.

BTW. I have a choice. Go with HV pump or standard oil pump?

I am feeling this time I will go with standard.


Too bad the vendor (ARP) doesn't provide a picture of the installation orientation . . . I have seen [HD] pump shafts that are cut with little or no clearance many times and most engine builders won't bother to blueprint everything when assembling "non-factory matched" parts. I learned that lesson very early in my engine building days (unfortunately). Since then, I have always verified pump shaft length for the engine I'm building, distributor gear placement, especially if replacing a gear for cam compatibility, and gear clearance to block guide boss for dizzy. Blueprinting isn't just bearing clearances and balance weights . . . Too many things can go wrong when we mix-n-match parts from different manufacturers, and while they say "their parts are compatible", some aren't so compatible.

Glad you figured it out and know what it will take to put together a "bullet-proof" engine for your car.

Doc
 

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Novice question... how is a high volume different in terms of the pump shaft and is relation with the distributor?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
It's not. Same position. When I took out the pump to replace the oil pan and pick up I installed the arp oil shaft upside down. One hex end is actually long than the other so the shoulder of the shaft from the hex to the round part of the shaft pushed the distributor gear up ever so slightly with some bind. The distributor shaft is is slightly scuffed on the sides telling me something ain't exactly smooth.


Novice question... how is a high volume different in terms of the pump shaft and is relation with the distributor?
 

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So why's everyone recommending against a HV pump?
 

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Discussion Starter #34
It's more resist at those gears. I have both pumps gonna try something different and see.

So why's everyone recommending against a HV pump?
 

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HV Pumps: I was warned years ago by an engine builder that HV pump requires an adequate supply of oil, ie large oil pan, and a very reliable oil return system..larger ports and drain back passages to ensure the pump is always fed, otherwise it "may" pump the oil pan supply enough to expose the oil pickup. For what it's worth.
 

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Novice question... how is a high volume different in terms of the pump shaft and is relation with the distributor?
High volume &/or high pressure pumps require more input ( torque) to drive them than their standard volume counterparts. This additional load is on the distributor gear and cam gear that it meshes with. There have been many instances where distributor/cam gears failed prematurely when high pressure or high volume pumps have been used. The other failure point with a 221, 260, 289 or 302 have been a twisted oil pump drive shaft (not so with 351s because they use a 5/16" shaft rather than 1/4").

Jeff
 
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