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Discussion Starter #1
I'm continuing to save up for a future MKIV kit and had a quick question on timeline. I understand build time can vary drastically from build to build but I figured most people I hear from say it takes about two to three years to get the car to a point where it is ready to send to a painter. My question is, is it possible to have the car finished and ready to send to a painter in two to three years if my work time is limited to weekends only (e.g., it is going to be difficult to get in the garage during the week). If not, how long have people typically been taking if they are weekend warriors only?

For context, my planned build will have some, but not many, modifications, and I do have some experience in car building (a 1965 C10 Restorod).
 

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If you stick to the "book" you can easily do one in year or so. I did my Mkll in 7 months while I was working and traveling but I did do a few hours on it 3 or 4 nights a week.
David W
 

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2-3 years of weekends only is easily do-able. Figure 250-300 hours for a first timer then divide that by the number of hours per week you can spend.

Good luck!

Jeff
 

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Like Jeff said, it's easy to do, just be sure to not get frustrated if everything doesn't go easy. 5 hrs a day for each Saturday & Sunday, will get an easy 500 hrs at the end of a year. But come here often, and we can easily make it a 1000 hour project with upgrades and changes. >:)
 

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I'm a first time builder, with no experience. I just wanted to add no matter how much you stick to the book with out customizing the the bottom line it is a custom car.

I do great when I have the instructions to follow and I get a lot done all at once.

However there are plenty of steps where it's up to you to provide that part, place it and figure out how to make it work with the kit. Not every step is clearly spelled out.

These are times when things come to a screeching halt for me.

For instance I just installed the drive tran. Now I need to get fuel to it. The accelerator cable and clutch cable. All this depends on your set up and all is custom. I'm at a stand still now.

Just something to think about. One guy wrote this may look like a Lego set follow the instructions and you will complete just like anyone else that has a kit. That's simply not true. You will have a unique custom car at the end and that takes time.

Jason
 

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From my experience, if you don't go into the garage for a year or longer, the pace of completion slows down quite a bit. Still trying to figure that out...
 

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I've been working for the past 6 months on my build. First time. Some days it feels like I'm pretty close to my first start. Other days it's overwhelming thinking of all that's left. This summer has slowed down with other hobbies and vacations getting in the way. The first third of the build goes really fast since all the parts are there and just bolt on. I found that the build process slows significantly once you need to consider fuel and drive train combinations. I'm in the process of putting my engine together but am learning about the correct ignition system that will play well with my engine and fuel delivery options. For me, I'm enjoying the process and want to make sure I'm doing everything correctly. This forum has a ton of knowledgeable people who have helped immensely along the way.
 

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Worked alone 9 months working 2 hours a day with big gaps for cold days & 5 or 6 hours on Saturday.
 

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Working out of a one-car garage, I had my car on the road legally in 4 months. I set a goal for the weekend, figured what I needed, ordered if needed, and hit it hard on Friday night. I drove it ugly with matching duct tape for 7k miles before I sent it out for paint.
It was my first and only build. Now 64k miles of smiles later, I’m loving it just as much!
Just take your time, enjoy the build, and even though you may do a few things a couple times keep this in mind, you’re not alone by a long shot!!
 

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Others have stated the time frame very well. I will add, that I enjoyed the build time as much as any other aspect of the car.

I treated every phase that I did not have experience in as an opportunity to learn a new skill.

The satisfaction and pride of building is worth a million bucks. And the confidence that you will gain will transfer into many other fields.
 

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For me, building a car was one of those get out of your comfort zone and learn moments. Like in life, determination is leading factor to getting jobs done. Set your budget and goals and gets started. And when you get stuck, reach out for help. There are many clubs and forums to help you.
 

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I will just add this. I started mine then met a now friend in the area that began his after mine. He is a project manager by trade. He got his done way faster than mine. I attribute it to him being more organized than me. I had more wrench experience, he has the organizational ability, his is registered, mine hasn't breathed life yet.

That and project creep is real. I've gone rather far off the reservation from my original plan.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Wow, lots of great responses. Thanks.

I'm definitely aware of project creep, my 1965 C10 project turned into an all-out custom restorod that also happened to require significant rust repair - everywhere.

With this build I suspect most of the modifications will be pretty bare bones (the cars are gorgeous in their own right). I just wanted to make sure that when I heard of people completing their project in 2 or 3 years that I didn't overlook that those same people were in the garage a few hours every single day. From what I gather here, it sounds like I should be safe so long as I keep with it and don't let it go dormant for long periods at a time.
 
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