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Discussion Starter · #261 ·
Great to see you stepping closer and closer to completing the doors.

As an FYI, ABS resists UV but not long term. I don't know how much the sides will see sunlight but it may discolor after a while
Thanks for the reminder! It's possible that some of these ABS parts might be covered with upholstery material some time in the future. Meanwhile we'll see how it goes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #262 ·
We had a beautiful warm dry spring day today so it was time to take the Daytona out to check out the results of all the work I've done on it this winter. The biggest item on the punch list was to finish closing in the doors and get some weather stripping on them. But there was also a bunch of other smaller projects that I wrapped up.

I was not disappointed! The doors still don't seal completely but the road noise is much reduced, the backup camera works, the steering is nice and tight, the rattles in the hood and doors are gone, the eBrake boot seals well and the hot breeze from the engine compartment is gone. It's gonna have to get a little warmer to see how the AC is doing.

The driving itself was as fun as ever. I took it a little easy on the back roads since there are still spots of gravel on some of them. And it sure was fun getting a little squirrely leaning into third gear! Good stuff!
 

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Discussion Starter · #263 ·
I think I mentioned DynaDeck a while ago. It made a huge difference in the amount of engine heat finding its way into the cabin. The 72" roll didn't cover the entire floor area, so I got a 36" roll of the stuff to finish it off.
I think it looks pretty good. And I expect it will help make things a little more comfortable for a possible road trip this summer.

Here's a pic before reinstalling the driver's seat.

DynaDeck Complete by Team Limer, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #264 ·
I went to a couple of car shows today but the cold blustery weather with a threat of rain kept most folks away. Even so, I had a great time talking coupe stuff with a few car guys. Then I took the long way home.
Have I mentioned how much I love driving this car?!

Untitled by Team Limer, on Flickr
Untitled by Team Limer, on Flickr
Untitled by Team Limer, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #265 ·
I keep having those days when I go to the garage with no particular plan and find stuff to keep me busy for hours! Baby steps for a better ride!
 

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Discussion Starter · #266 · (Edited)
I went to a nearby car show today with my FFR Type 65 Coupe and what did I see but what looked like a Ferrari 250 GTO! I took a few pics, chatted with the owner and suggested we stage a Ford v Ferrari photo shoot.

Untitled by Team Limer, on Flickr

Obviously its not an original Ferrari GTO!. Given its size, the strut rear suspension, and an inline 6 that looks very much like a Datsun engine I'd say its a redressed Datsun Z car. Still its a very cool ride!
 

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Discussion Starter · #268 · (Edited)
Every time I filled the tank I'd have fuel splashing on the side of the car. I think I finally solved it!

I'm using a custom fuel tank with a straight fill tube about 2" in diameter and 16" long connected to the FFR provided fuel filler cap. The tank has a flat top with the fittings at the top of the front edge.

A few things might have contributed to this but I figured it mostly boiled down to no venting in the fuel fill tube, even though the tank is well vented. I took a cue from my Mustang's filler neck and a long ago post by forum member Oxide and built a tube within a tube for my fuel fill.

Untitled by Team Limer, on Flickr

This assembly fits in my fuel fill tube just below the cap. The fuel nozzle fits inside a nipple welded to the plate and fuel flows into the tank through the attached fuel-safe hose. The area in the filler neck outside the hose serves as a vent for the filler neck.

I've done two tank fills with the nozzle at full squeeze with no splash back. Yay!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #269 ·
I was hoping to take my Daytona on the Rally North America road rally in June. It would involve a 3 day road trip to Durango CO, 4 more days on the rally ending in Las Vegas, then a drive back home to PA. I'm very confident that the car would do the trip just fine. And with ear protection it's a comfortable enough ride. But the likelihood of temperatures over 100 degrees in the desert areas has convinced me to take the old reliable Team Limer Mustang instead. I need to get some summertime AC driving done before making this commitment with the Daytona.
On the other hand, things are looking good for a friend and I to partner up to finish the Lincoln Highway cruise that we had to cut short last year. I'll post up more when our plans firm up, but keep your eyes peeled for a 1977 Maverick and a gel-coat Daytona on the road this September. Maybe a meet up with my friends in the Bay Area Daytona Association (BADAss)!
 

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Discussion Starter · #270 ·
The big news today is that the AC is now working! I was in a bit of a thrash when I first installed it and it showed. I fixed my control panel wiring, replaced leaking vacuum lines and a vacuum solenoid, fixed a couple of leaks in the refrigerant lines (a bad crimp and leaking schrader valve) and had the condenser pressure tested.

I've been putting some miles on the Daytona and taking it to car shows and cruises while I tackle a list of minor projects. It just keeps getting better! I really love driving this thing ... 5400 miles so far.

My friend and I are postponing the Lincoln Highway road trip that I mentioned earlier, probably till next spring. We couldn't make it fit our calendars and having a little more time to sort out our rides wouldn't hurt. More later.
 

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Every time I filled the tank I'd have fuel splashing on the side of the car. I think I finally solved it!

I'm using a custom fuel tank with a straight fill tube about 2" in diameter and 16" long connected to the FFR provided fuel filler cap. The tank has a flat top with the fittings at the top of the front edge.

A few things might have contributed to this but I figured it mostly boiled down to no venting in the fuel fill tube, even though the tank is well vented. I took a cue from my Mustang's filler neck and a long ago post by forum member Oxide and built a tube within a tube for my fuel fill.

Untitled by Team Limer, on Flickr

This assembly fits in my fuel fill tube just below the cap. The fuel nozzle fits inside a nipple welded to the plate and fuel flows into the tank through the attached fuel-safe hose. The area in the filler neck outside the hose serves as a vent for the filler neck.

I've done two tank fills with the nozzle at full squeeze with no splash back. Yay!!!
Glen,

Neat idea! Can you share a pic with it installed?
I'm trying to envison how the air escapes, does it come through the same hose and just by passes in the collar through the vent holes on the top?

Thanks,

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #272 ·
Glen,

Neat idea! Can you share a pic with it installed?
I'm trying to envison how the air escapes, does it come through the same hose and just by passes in the collar through the vent holes on the top?

Thanks,

John
John

Yeah, it needs a little explanation! The entire assembly that you see in the picture is installed inside the large diameter fuel fill hose, so getting a picture of it installed isn't possible. It's basically a hose inside a hose. The inner hose for fuel and the outer one for air.

Here's how the entire assembly is put together.

The stainless steel part is a reducer that connects to the fuel tank on one end and the LeMans cap on the other end with appropriate sized hoses. The plate is tack welded onto the large end of the reducer. There is a 1" hose barb welded to the back of the plate and it is aligned with the large hole. One end of the 1" ID black hose is connected to the hose barb. The other end of the hose is a little above the top of the tank and is not connected. The small holes on the perimeter are outside the diameter of the hose.

Note that there is a gap between the 1" ID hose and the small end of the reducer.

As the tank is being filled the fuel flows from the nozzle into the hose barb and the 1" ID hose and into the fuel tank. Air can escape from the tank in the space that exits outside of the 1" ID hose, through the gap between the hose and the reducer and through the small vent holes that are drilled in the plate.

Hope this helps
 

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John

Yeah, it needs a little explanation! The entire assembly that you see in the picture is installed inside the large diameter fuel fill hose, so getting a picture of it installed isn't possible. It's basically a hose inside a hose. The inner hose for fuel and the outer one for air.

Here's how the entire assembly is put together.

The stainless steel part is a reducer that connects to the fuel tank on one end and the LeMans cap on the other end with appropriate sized hoses. The plate is tack welded onto the large end of the reducer. There is a 1" hose barb welded to the back of the plate and it is aligned with the large hole. One end of the 1" ID black hose is connected to the hose barb. The other end of the hose is a little above the top of the tank and is not connected. The small holes on the perimeter are outside the diameter of the hose.

Note that there is a gap between the 1" ID hose and the small end of the reducer.

As the tank is being filled the fuel flows from the nozzle into the hose barb and the 1" ID hose and into the fuel tank. Air can escape from the tank in the space that exits outside of the 1" ID hose, through the gap between the hose and the reducer and through the small vent holes that are drilled in the plate.

Hope this helps
Thanks Glen,

That makes sense now! Where did you get the fitting?

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #274 ·
I made that part from a piece of 1/8” steel with a hose barb welded to the back. It’s tacked into the end of the reducer.
I find that a fuel nozzle barely fits inside the opening. One of these days I’m going to weld in a short piece of 1” pipe between the plate and the hose barb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #275 ·
At 5700 miles you'd think I'd have the car pretty well sorted. But another problem came to the surface that I had to deal with. And the source of the problem was a bit of a surprise.
For some time I've been seeing an occasional drop or two of coolant on the floor under the car, but not enough to track it down to the source. But last Monday there was a small puddle and the trail of coolant on the frame led to the welded seam on the driver's side radiator tank. The seam rests squarely on the edge of the 1/8" mount with nothing but a piece of fuel hose for cushioning. I was always a little suspicious of that setup and figured that to be the cause. I pulled the radiator out and took it to a local shop for repair. Meanwhile I made a broader support for the radiator by welding 1-1/2" x 3" piece of 1/8" steel to the outboard sides of the radiator mounts.
I was all geared up to start whining about Factory Five's radiators and the mounting method.

The trail of the leak leads to the radiator seam right above the mount.
The Trail of the Leak by Team Limer, on Flickr

The bit of fuel hose is pretty flattened, but still intact.
The Suspect Radiator Mount by Team Limer, on Flickr

While the radiator is out and at the shop I welded a couple of pads to the outboard sides of the radiator mount.
It's Out! by Team Limer, on Flickr
 

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Discussion Starter · #276 ·
The radiator shop told me that the leak wasn't at the bottom where I suspected. Rather it was where the top two tubes connect to the tank. He also told me that a lot of garbage flushed out of the radiator. It's bits of thin light blue rubbery stuff as though a nitrile glove was running through the cooling system!

Another coupe owner related his experience with his radiator leaks and the notion of "Steamers" ... leaks just like mine that are caused by steam accumulating at the top of the radiator.

Putting two and two together I checked my steam hose (the hose running from the top of the radiator to the coolant tank) and check valve. Sure enough the check valve was completely blocked with this crud!!!

The repaired "Steamer" leaks at the top of the tank
Untitled by Team Limer, on Flickr

The Crud!
The Cause Was This Crud by Team Limer, on Flickr

I don't know how this stuff got into the cooling system! Since my engine came from a wrecked Mustang maybe somebody tried to seal something up with a rubber glove. In any event, I'll be keeping an eye on that check valve!
 

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Discussion Starter · #277 ·
With the cooling system sorted out my current issue is with the air conditioning system. After a short drive it didn’t seem to be cooling very well. I attributed that to the small size of the evaporator until I stopped at a light. At idle the engine seemed to be surging. At home I found that the AC compressor was cycling off and on every few seconds.

Too much refrigerant? Not enough refrigerant? Incompatible compressor? To get some data we put some gauges on it and found the low side pressure looked pretty good but the high side pressures spiked very high the moment the compressor kicked in.

After talking with some people who should know it seems that the likely problem is a blockage caused by some trash in the system. I’m making arrangements to have the system purged, back flushed and refilled.

How much ya wanna bet there’s bits of a blue nitrile glove in there!
 
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