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Banned
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6,100 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I did not want to pay 900.00 for a powdercoat spray booth so i built my own. I ordered 5 sheets of Hot dipped galvanized steel from www.eastwood.com
part number 28203
-then i went to lowes and bought a sliding closet door rail to weld to the rear piece of sheet metal to allow the use of a regular house filter.
-Then i bought a cheap 12.00 bathroom exhaust fan and cut a hole in the rear panel behind the filter location and wired on a plug.
- I had to buy a nibbler to cut the top piece of sheet metal, but it was only 30.00 at harbor freight.
_I used the leftover piece of sheetmetal to make a door/hatch for the filter location. This way there is not an open space at the rear where the filter slides out for replacement.
Thought some of you might like this. It ended up costing around 160.00 for everything. I recomend riveted the panels together instead of welding.
 

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Senior Charter Member
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3,588 Posts
I just took the crate my transmission came in, stapled some clear plastic sheeting three sides, and now I have a spray booth.

Pete
 

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just another builder
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8,238 Posts
cobrastang...be sure to isolate the fan motor somehow...don't need a spark at the wrong time...i've heard of people using shop vacs and eventually burned the place down from an simple spark
 

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Heat & Beat Specialist
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529 Posts
Got any pictures of this contraption?? I've just been letting my powder fall to the floor. (everywhere) ;)
 

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Banned
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Discussion Starter #7
I will get some pics when i get home this evening. Well, i guess i will have to come up with a way to isolate the fan motor. Maybe i will attach it to something else and then run a plastic tube to the back of the cabinet-that should work.
How am i going to cure something that big?? Well, i am planning on just doing the small parts myself. I took the differential to a local powdercoating company. I have an oven that is basically brand new that i purchased from one of my friends. He was moving and his new house had a gas oven. I almost feel bad using it as a powdercoating over, but oh well, i am sure it will have a good life curing parts for me.
I'll get those pics posted soon. I have to go out of town, but it will be Monday at the latest.
 

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Premium Member
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17,839 Posts
I used the oven rack for a model, and built a simple wooden box out of scrap lumber I had lying around. There are two positions to put the oven rack on. On top for parts that are hung by wire. Down towards the bottom for parts that sit on the rack. I cut open a large plastic lawn bag and drape it over the rack to catch the overspray. When I'm done I carefully fold up the plastic with all the overspray in it. Simple, cheap, effective. If it doesn't fit in the rack it doesn't fit in the oven, so I can't PC it.
 
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