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FFCobra Craftsman
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I have never used a polisher. I have the 7 in. polisher buffer HF sells and the first project is the 87 cherokee with severe scratches from brush and what not on the trail. When I buff with the polisher do I use it to apply the wax/polish or to take it off or both?
 

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FFCobra Craftsman
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4,241 Posts
First question.. is it like a "sears" buffer... or like a Porter Cable buffer... Dont understand what you may have... The sears one is just to mimic what you would do my band... on the other hand the Porter Cable one is for detailing work.. buffing polishin etc...!

Rgds

Rob

Like this?


Or like this?


Alot of people use:3M compounds:

Perfect-It 3 Rubbing compound
Perfect-It 3 Machine glaze
Perfect-It 3 Finishing compound

They were $20 to $30 per quart EACH

[ September 27, 2002, 07:33 PM: Message edited by: Rob ]
 

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FFCobra Fanatic
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381 Posts
Alright Gary,
Here goes, you can apply the compound any way you are comfortable with. I sugest starting with a small applicator pad and puting a dime/quarter sized amount on the pad and swirling it heavily around a 1 to 2 foot area on the car. Get the feel of the machine you are using and how the compound you are using reacts and then apply it however is easiest for you. I usually let the buffer spread the compund and take it off. But only because I'm too lazy to take the extra step of applying the stuff by hand. I just squirt it on the car straight from the bottle and start buffing. I use up buffing pads faster that way though(they "load" up with compound faster) Always use new or at least very clean pads at the start of every job. And you are supposed to use a new pad for every level of compound you use or you could really mess up a finish polish if you just used the pad for heavy cutting. And start with a clean car or it will just get worse. Sorry to ramble, hope it semi answered your question. I've cleaned cars for a long time so feel free to email me and I'll help if I can.

Chad
 

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Official Member of the Unofficial "First 500 Club"
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As Rob wrote, use the 3M products and also get rid of that diaper/bonnet thing. 3M sells foam pads and a special vecro attaching pad that goes on the buffer. Use the foam pads for the 3M Machine Polish and 3M Swirl Reducer. You will need at least a couple for each type of compound, as they get wet and start to lose effectiveness. I just rinse them out and let them air dry later.

Get some wool pads and start with the 3M Medium Cut for the Jeep. Work it in quickly and buff until it is about dry. I then wipe off the residue with a good towel, then it's time for the Machine Polish. Then the Swirl reducer. After this you can wax or Zaino the car.

Watch out near sharp fender edges as you can "burn through" the paint. Wear old sweatshirts and old jeans too, you will be covered in the stuff. Oh yeah, the compound will also spray all over the place. My toolbox still has stuff on it from a few years ago.
 

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Premium Member
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3,185 Posts
Gary, you ought to come by the shop so I can give you some tips. that buffer will make a mess of things in a hurry if you're not familiar with it. that bonnet thing is really designed for an orbital buffer, not rotary. foam pads are awesome, cept one thing, they will litterally "EAT" corners and edges. don't use the buffer for wax. machine compound, polish, or glaze only. I use a 3m superbuffIII(wool) with perfectit III compound. it cuts quickly, is very difficult to burn with, and leaves a very nice finish ready for glaze then wax. cheers, SRP
 
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