Factory Five Racing Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
FFCobra Fanatic
Joined
·
843 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After 2 nights me and my back have had enough. I have a brake line leak in the front that I can't fix and need some suggestions.

I used NAPA pre-flaired lines everywhere and they are all fine except the one "T" fitting (from NAPA) that splits the 2 front lines after the master cyl.. Attached is a picture (sorry for the quality but I guess my camera is tired too...). I replaced all the flaired lines and compression couplers going to it (2 shown in the picture). When I found the leak I started tightening then applied the brake to check again. I kept tightening and checking until now I can't tighten the fittings anymore without snapping them. I made sure that there was no junk on the threads before assembling. It appears to be leaking between the "T" and the couplers as shown in the picture.

Can I used a thread sealant like Teflon tape on these? I didn't use it anywhere else and have no leaks except here. Is there a different fitting I should use?

Thanks
Chris

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
I had the same problem, turns out the flare was bad and because the brass is so soft the bad flair did a lot of damage to the brass T I replaced the T and reflaird the line and no more leak. Brake fluid would eat up the teflon tape.
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
Oh yeah if the T has no male or female in it and is just a pipe fitting, they are slightly taperd and you don't want to wrench them to hard or they will leak....been there done that got the T-shirt
Mike
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,393 Posts
I am assuming that the 2 couplers are 1/8" IPS..tapered pipe thread...into the tee. If that's where the leak is and not at the flare fitting end of the coupler, the problem is usually a poorly cut thread. I would suggest a good quality pipe thread sealant, either Permatex or Locktite, that is made for high pressure hydraulics. Flared fittings should never have sealant, tapered pipe threads should always have sealant.

Happy motoring
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
764 Posts
im a little confused here, you mean to say you used compression fittings? i thought they could not hold the pressure of the brake fluid. i was under the impression that all connections should be a double flare fitting. im not a brake guru but why didnt you use flare fittings? vince
 

·
FFCobra Fanatic
Joined
·
843 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Vince,
Everyone I talked with says that the compression fittings are ok. These were only used when I had a section that went from a bubble flare to a double flare (like from the front disks to this "T" fitting). I used double flared lines everywhere else.

The leak is not at any of the compression fittings or double flared junctions just between the "T" and the fittings shown in the picture (which is a tapered thread, not a flared fitting going into the "T").

I'm going to visit a local hydraulic shop today to see what they may have. I'm in a little bit of a time crunch as my painted body is due back from the shop on Saturday and I'd rather not work on brake lines (brake fluid) with a freshly painted body. "Serenity now, serenity now" (for you Seinfeld fans).

Chris
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,393 Posts
I don't want to cause undue anxiety, but Vince is right. The "pull-out" strength of compression fittings is way below the pressures likely to be encountered in a brake system. I wouldn't use them under any circumstances. If you have a need for bubble flares, you can make them with your standard double flare tool, and the nuts are available at NAPA and elsewhere.

Happy motoring
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
474 Posts
Brass compression fittings no.. BUT Aeroquipe, Tompkins, Swagelock, Weatherhead, all make steel flairless, ferrule type, non flair hydraulic fittings some good up to 5000 psi and impulse rated.... a little expensive but correct...if anyone is interested I have part interest in a hydraulic industrial parts company...Eric aka Menace

[ August 22, 2002, 10:04 AM: Message edited by: menace ]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,886 Posts
An easy way to solve the inverted flare/bubble flare problem is with adapters: then you can use pre-flared tubing thruout, and use adapters where a bubble flare port is used (generally only the master cylinder). Any good auto parts store should carry them, and they are available to adapt to both standard and metric bubble flare.

Stant has an on-line listing with part numbers of all major manufacturers: see this page:

Hydraulic Brake Fitting adapter page

While you're at it, why not just get rid of the tapered pipe-thread adapters and just use a "T" with inverted flare seats? Stant also catalogs those--see bottom of this page:
http://www.stant.com/brochure.cfm?brochure=632&location_id=177
(Where it says "tube size", those are inverted flare openings, where it says "pipe thread", those are NPT taper. Some fittings even have both!) A Weatherhead 702X3 is what you need if you're using 3/16 preflared brakelines.

HTH

Forrest

[ August 22, 2002, 11:48 AM: Message edited by: forrest1 ]
 

·
FFCobra Fanatic
Joined
·
843 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Went at lunch and found a "T" with built-in flares. That should fix my leak up front. One down one to go.

The compression fitting issue is going to be a tougher one as the lines are plumbed and the aluminum panels are riveted on. The compression fitting connects together a section of line with a bubble flair and a section of line that has a double flair. I used pre-flared lines and do not have a flaring tool. The main line that has the compression fitting runs the length of the car to the back brakes and is not easily removed or flared where it is mounted (read: will only do at last resort if needed). Suggestions?

Thanks guys for the input so far....
Chris
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top