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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My rear brake lines pass along the bottom of the Driver Side 4" tube and up to the MC area passing pretty close to the headers.

While I was installing the brake lines, I decided to insulate them by cutting a fuel hose and wrapping it around the brake line. I first did this just around the headers to protect it against the heat.

But as I was going down and along the 4" tube under the driver's seat, I decided to cover it there from elements.

Last night, as I was preparing the car for track time this weekend, it came to me that the brake lines heat up and the rubber fuel lines that cover them may reduce the amount of heat they need to release and affect hard braking at the track.

Wrong! Right! Should I remove the protection/insulation?

Thanks in advance.

-Kouros
 

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Kouros:
I would keep the protective insulation on the brake line under the driver's seat,I don't see how it could effect the brakes in any way.
It would seem reasonable to think that the majority of the heat is going to come from pads heating the calipers which in turn will heat the brake fluid directly behind it,that your insulation is not going have any appreciable effect on heat one way or another.
Just my .02 cents.
BTW have fun this weekend!
Paul M. ;)
 

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FFCobra Master Craftsman
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I insulated my brake and fuel lines the same way as they curve under the footboxes because this is where they are most likely to get hit by a rock thrown from a front tire. I left the remainder uncovered.

Just a guess but I don't think the fluid really moves around much (something would have to stir it up a lot - probably more than just the motion of the car) in the lines so the hot fluid near the rotors will stay there for the most part and the cooler fluid away from that area will remain cool. Again, just a guess.
 

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Keep the insulation. Heat is not good for brake fluid. The 2 sources for heat are where they run near the headers and at the calipers. Insulate near the headers and later, if you have the time, engunity and dollars, add cooling ducts to bring fresh cool air to the rotars and calipers. High quality brake fluid with a higher flash point helps also. Most of the first time and second time drivers are running near stock brake set-ups. After you get bit by the bug and your driving skills improve you can start with the upgrades.

Remember that this is your first time on the track. You shouldn't be pushing it all that hard. You have a new car and if you did the brakes right (and I'm sure you did) you should be fine. If you start to get a little fading from your brakes, slow down and let them cool off. Give the point bys and be safe. COCOA is not a race and you have nothing to prove. Just be safe and have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Doug,
Thanks! The CobraEarl footbox vents that I purchased allow me to adda shorter air hoses to my brakes as well. Great suggestion as I only have to spend time and install them.

On the other hand in the past, I've been to different tracks a few times and with different fast cars, just not with Cobra built by me and on Willow Springs. Nor do I have the intension of being the fastest on the track. My particiation is soley for learning my newly built car so I'm going to be very careful and comfortable. As far as I'm concerned safety is #1 and everyone will get the point by. I'm also looking forward to learn from others.

I'm not sure how you assumed I was going to push hard. I just asked about brake line insulation :D !

Insulation will stay then. Thanks all!

-Kouros
 

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Can't see where having the lines covered with hose could hurt in any way. Worse that could happen is you gain protection if something were to hit the lines underneath. For the lines to get soo hot to have an effect on the brakes,the rubber would start to smell probally.
Have fun at the track. You relize it is addicting.
 

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Originally posted by Kouros:
Last night, as I was preparing the car for track time this weekend, it came to me that the brake lines heat up and the rubber fuel lines that cover them may reduce the amount of heat they need to release and affect hard braking at the track.

Wrong! Right! Should I remove the protection/insulation?
If you're concerned about keeping heat away from the lines where they pass by the headers, you should use some type of heat reflective material over the lines in that area. It seems to me the fuel line wrapping will just heat up, transmit the heat into the lines and also keep the heat in the lines longer.

But I don't know if fuel lines already have some sort of heat reflective material built into them. If so, nevermind what I said. ;)
 

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I'm not sure how you assumed I was going to push hard. I just asked about brake line insulation !
Kuros, I didn't mean to imply that you would. I've seen to many guys on their first time out make that mistake. In fact I saw a guy total his car the first weekend on the track (and had an instructor in the car with him). Your already ahead of the game if you have some track experience. So let's have fun this weekend! I and a lot of others are looking forward to running with you.
 

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Originally posted by Kouros:
But as I was going down and along the 4" tube under the driver's seat, I decided to cover it there from elements.
What about the lines rusting through? If water condenses on the outside of the brake lines and the fuel tubing keeps the moisture in contact with the brake lines, wouldn't that increase the chances of the lines rusting out prematurely? Just a thought.
 

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Originally posted by slaga:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Kouros:
But as I was going down and along the 4" tube under the driver's seat, I decided to cover it there from elements.
What about the lines rusting through? If water condenses on the outside of the brake lines and the fuel tubing keeps the moisture in contact with the brake lines, wouldn't that increase the chances of the lines rusting out prematurely? Just a thought. </font>[/QUOTE]Good Point, esp. if you are not using stainless or CuNiFer tubing.

Check out Gravel Guard coiled spring shields from Classic Tube.

Mike
 
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