Factory Five Racing Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
FFCobra Fanatic
Joined
·
2,672 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Getting close to time to do this. How hard is it really to do? I was seriously considering the pre-bent sets that are available but since I already have the lines and can rent the bending/flaring kit from AutoBone for free, I figured it was worth a try. Is it tricky to do? Any pointers/tips/tricks? I saw the thread about the footbox - I plan to cleco the panels in while I'm fitting the lines.

Thanks.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
3,760 Posts
I'm gonna try it on mine. One more thing I can say I did myself, pre-bent/flared will be my last resort.

I have a buddy that just finished a hot IHRA Camaro, he bent and flared all his own lines, it was the first time he had ever done it. He said it was fine and kind of fun.

AJ
 

·
Land Shark!
Joined
·
4,668 Posts
The brake lines are easy, they bend with no problem and are pretty hard to kink.

The fuel lines are another story, the 5/16 lines kink pretty easy if you try to bend a tight radius.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
333 Posts
I did it myself but it takes a lot of patience. The hard part is the double flaring. Practice on some scraps first. Flaring tools are not created equal. I was able to get a cheap craftsman tool to work but it wasn't easy. I was very satisfied with my finished product and I had no leaks.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
4,494 Posts
Buy the Tristates prebent kit, you will be very happy with them, easy to install and you won't have any leaks. Double flairing the all the ends of the FFR lines is not that easy, and you would need to buy a good (expensive) double flairing tool set. Those cost $50 or more, so your real cost of the Tristate kit is only about $100.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
5,042 Posts
Did all my brake and fuel lines, no problems. Only a few minor weeps of brake fluid which went away with a little more tightening. I did the double flares too with a $20 tool.

It's not what you buy it's what you build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Bending is easy. Flaring is harder. Spend a few bucks on the NAPA preflared lines, the time you save makes it a good investment. Also, it is easier to lay them down straight since they don't start off in a coil. I toyed with the idea of getting pre-bent lines also... but I was glad I didn't when I was done. I actually had fun doing the bending. But that's just me.


-Matt
 

·
FFCobra Fanatic
Joined
·
2,672 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Has anybody used the AutoZone bending/flaring tool? Would this be one of the cheap ones? I would guess it probably is.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
16,719 Posts
I bought the preflared lines. There is post somewhere with the lengths you will need. I had the brake lines in in a few hours. I also bought the nylon fuel lnes from Ron Morris performance.
Where the steel lines took me hours to wrestle in place and finally take back out again, the nylons lines and fittings took only an hour to install.
I still think that this is what should come with the kits. And if you really wanted to you could slide some rubber hose over them like the Ford folks do.



Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 

·
FFCobra Fanatic
Joined
·
871 Posts
I did my brake lines with a cheap Harbor Freight flaring tool. It was able to make maybe six flares before it wore out to the point of needing to be filed on the adjoinging surfaces to make it tighter. This was on top of mounting it in a vise to hold the tubing tight. Practicing would have worn it out before I made the final flares. The fuel lines are AN -6 and were done with a really nice Ridgid 37° flaring tool. They were easy. The bending of the lines was not a problem, but I routed the lines to avoid making very tight bends.
 

·
Just Pluggin Along
Joined
·
1,175 Posts
Do yourself a favor and buy the pre-flared brake lines from NAPA or some other equivalent. They cost about $30 total with adapters, the same you would spend on a flaring tool. I have not had one leak from the pre-flared lines and no headaches trying to figure out how to make a good flare.

Bending is easy, just do not attempt a very tight radius without a tubing bender. As long as you take your time, you could bend with a piece of 1" broom handle. Just make sure to take accurate measurements and take the radius length into account when making your calculations.

I went with the Ron Morris nylon fuel lines and I have to agree that they are much easier than dealing with the steel fuel lines. I gave up on the steel lines after a couple of hours. Like Corey, I had the lines installed in about an hour.

Lilnuke
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,406 Posts
Craig, you saw my lines, didn't you? All bent and flared myself. The key is the tools. I got Ridgid benders and the Ridgid double flaring tool and had very good results with them, especially with the benders.

I wanted to route the lines myself exactly how I wanted to. I also figured it wouldn't be the last time I used the tools.

If you don't think you'll use the tools after the build, the NAPA pre-flared lines seem to be a good way to go. You'll still need a bender, but the job won't lighten your wallet. Check the FAQ for more info.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
725 Posts
You have to think which end you are going to bend first.
For example: If you bend the Driver footbox piece of the rear brake line first, you are going to have a real hard time bending the brake line around the body to the rear.
I prepared my bends by using a template made from coat hangers. Just strapped a few togeather then bend in place. Once you are happy with them test fit to make sure you can get it all in place.

I then did my actual bends against the coat hangers.
I also used the wire benders rather than a pipe bender, this helds against kinks.

Dave

Bent them, flared them, fitted them. No leaks.
 

·
Senior Charter Member
Joined
·
437 Posts
I went the NAPA route and bought the preflared lines. It was real easy, I picked up a bending tool from sears for $3.00 and then followed John Hudson's instructions w/pics and made no mistakes. Just take your time and think about what your doing. Couldn't have been easier. :D

John
 

·
FFCobra Fanatic
Joined
·
2,672 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the input. Sounds like pre-flared is the way to go. Hate to buy something when I already have it but this is the case sometimes!


I wonder if NAPA will open an account for me? Monthly billing might be easier... :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
To answer you question about the AutoZone loaner tool. I used it for the 2 or 3 fuel line double flares and it worked fine. (In case you are wondering, the manual has you flare the fuel line so that the rubber hoses don't slip off.) However, it was brand spanking new. I've read that if you get one that has been used much they don't work very well.

-Matt
 

·
Junior Charter Member
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
The Autozone bender worked great for me on the fuel line and the brake line. The flaring tool was another story. The first one worked just ok on the brake line. I went back another day to do the fuel lines and could not get them flared. Since I really want to eliminate the multiple connections on the fuel lines and the bent-up hard lines in the engine compartment, I am considering Ron Morris lines. His kit for the FFR is only $159.
 

·
Sr FFR builder
Joined
·
5,565 Posts
I first attempted to practice flare with a tool I bought from Summit. Right away, I broke the anvil tit. Very upset, I called Summit and had it replaced. During the wait, I decided to use preflared lines from Napa. However, I did have to cut a few to proper lengths. I then had to flare with a tool. I figured the trick to using the flare tool was to control to ram piece from moving sideways and breaking the anvil. The best way to do that is to secure the clamp/vise part in a bench vice so that you can hold the anvil steady while turning the screw and applying down pressure on the anvil. I was successful in flaring the few I needed and the job is done. Whew!!! Hope this helps.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top